Integrated Brand Communications
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Integrated Brand Communications
Focuses on branding and the role of communication methods such as advertising, events, sponsorships, content marketing and social media.
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Headline Psychology: 8 Tricks to Attract User Attention

Headline Psychology: 8 Tricks to Attract User Attention | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Why do other people’s posts get clicks in the hundreds while your excellent innovative studies stay persistently underrated? You may be missing one of the most powerful user attractions of all – an engaging headline.

 

In this article, you’ll find 8 elements that will make your headlines winners, and you’ll learn exactly why they are such effective tricks in terms of human psychology.

Here we go!

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Here are some #copywriting guidelines for how to draw attention to your #contentmarketing and other brand related messages.

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How Headlines Can Help Your Online Content Find its Audience: 3 Tips

How Headlines Can Help Your Online Content Find its Audience: 3 Tips | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

No words are more important in your content marketing than your headlines. No matter how wonderful the online content, if the headline isn't right, it's not going to attract the readership it deserves.

 

To help you write better headlines, here are three lessons I’ve learned throughout my career, which has spanned both traditional marketing copy and editorial content creation.

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Useful guidelines from a copywriting veteran for crafting headlines to help brand content attract attention.

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Maryse Rebillot's curator insight, May 26, 2014 9:48 AM

How to draw your audience's attention to your content ?  Now, let's try the tips!

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Why content marketing doesn't work and what you can do about it » Informly - Informly

Why content marketing doesn't work and what you can do about it » Informly - Informly | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO CREATING CONTENT THAT CONVERTS

Posted by Dan on Wednesday 3rd April, 2013 in Content Marketing

 

I’m going to fill you in on something scary. For most people, content marketing does not work. In this post I’ll explain why and show you step by step how to create content that does (i.e. content that drives opt ins, leads and revenue to your business).

RESEARCH ON WHY CONTENT MARKETING DOES NOT WORK

In a recent Content Marketing Institute (CMI) survey of 1,400 companies they found that only 36%regarded their content marketing as effective! Damn that’s a pretty low number and I’m committed to ensure that by the end of this post you will be able to count yourself in the small group of people who are doing content marketing that does work. But first let’s get back to this research (by the way all links discussed in this post are available at the end).

There are some more alarming results in the research including:

This year less companies are using their content to generate sales (isn’t that what we are here for?)The number 1 goal of content marketing is ‘brand awareness’The number 1 way content is measured is by looking at ‘Web Traffic’The number 1 challenge identified is to ‘create more content’

p.s. I noticed just last night they published new research specifically about software companies and take a guess what their number 1 goal is? (leads). Software companies get it! 

Outbrain in partnership with Econsultancy have also published research into the goals of content marketing where ‘Increased sales’ was well behind ‘Traffic to website’ as a ‘Business objective’ of content marketing.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Some great copywriting guidelines for developing compelling content.

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jaynalocke's curator insight, April 7, 2013 12:12 PM

There are many ways to approach content marketing, many of which are neither effective nor sustainable. This post tells you how to go from creating content to meet "vanity" objectives to creating content for sales and conversion metrics. Nice.

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7 Tips to Write Better AdWords copy (and improve CTRs) - Smart Insights Digital Marketing Advice

7 Tips to Write Better AdWords copy (and improve CTRs) - Smart Insights Digital Marketing Advice | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Plus examples of good and poor practice in writing ad copy Paid search advertising provides an opportunity for almost any business to improve their visibility. Marketing topic(s):Paid search creative. Advice by Susanne Colwyn.

 

Paid search advertising provides an opportunity for almost any business to improve their visibility in the SERPs.

But creating an advert and setting it live isn’t enough. As Google continues on its mission to deliver only the highest quality search results, its rules around what adverts are generated and where they appear are ever stricter.

It is therefore essential that marketers do all they can to ensure their advert is seen – and that people click on it. One of the simplest ways to achieve this is to write better AdWords ads.

 
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A very useful set of copywriting tips for creation of better Adwords ads. Keep for future reference.

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The ultimate content audit checklist | SEOptimise

The ultimate content audit checklist | SEOptimise | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

I think it would be fair to say that Google’s major algorithm updates in the last couple of years have seen us all asking ourselves some tough questions about the quality of what we’re putting on the web. This soul-searching has seen many reform their link building habits, while others have seen Google’s clamp-downs on web spam as an endorsement of the high-quality link building they’d been doing all along. But the focus hasn’t just been on links:  the Panda update in its various iterations has shown that high-quality on-site content is paramount. This has seen the necessary rise of the content audit, and as someone who has long been a stickler for top notch content, I thought I’d share with you the process I go through and the things I include when I audit a site. I’d be really interested to hear how yours differ from mine, so feel free to leave a comment and let me know about the processes you use and the things you look at!

The giant content audit spreadsheet – and why I don’t use it

A question that often comes up when a client wants a content audit is what form it should take. Many consider a content audit to be a giant spreadsheet with every single URL listed, along with marks out of 10 for various quality metrics. Because of the sheer scale, this method often relies to an extent on automation, but that only gets you so far; a true assessment of content quality requires a human eye, and for bigger sites it’s not practical to look through every single page. While the process of content auditing in this way certainly has its merits, the way I like to do it has more of a qualitative focus that I believe gives the client considerably more value.

Look at a representative sample

Most websites follow templates that ensure a uniform design throughout the site – or at least they should! This means that content can be split into content types – for example, homepage, service page, product description page, blog post, and so on. Each content type is there to fulfill its own purpose, and requires its own assessment as to how well it achieves its aims. So why waste time looking at every single URL on the site when the comments you’re going to be making about one page in a particular category are likely to apply to the others in that content group?

I believe that the key to a good and actionable content audit is to look at a representative sample of a site’s content, providing concrete observations and recommendations and exploring in depth the actual experience of people using the site. They are, after all, by far the most important consideration.

The big content audit checklist

I’ll start with a disclaimer:  every site is different. I’m not a believer in sticking rigidly to templates, and I typically use the headings below just as a starting point. I will often add or remove sections according to what’s appropriate for the site I’m looking at.

So, here’s what I would look at…

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Very useful guidelines.

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