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Integrated Brand Communications
Focuses on branding and the role of communication methods such as advertising, events, sponsorships, content marketing and social media.
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Study: Mobile Ads Actually Do Work - Especially In Apps

Study: Mobile Ads Actually Do Work - Especially In Apps | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Even as mobile ad revenues skyrocket at sites such asFacebook and Twitter TWTR +0.65%, the little banners still don’t work as well as they could–or so goes thewidespread perception. But a new study out this morning from the mobile ad serving and tracking firmMedialets indicates that they work better than many advertisers thought.

What surely hasn’t worked is the ability to connect the dots between clicks and views on a smartphone or tablet with “conversions,” adspeak for getting people to buy something, download an app, apply for a credit card or simply click over to a web page. Unlike on standard computers, the identifiers called cookies mostly don’t work on mobile devices.

So Medialets, which works with many of the largest publishers from Google GOOGL +0.22% to the New York Times as well as mobile ad firms Millennial Media MM +0.85% and Twitter-owned MoPub, uses other means (if you must know,HTML5 local storage and hardware advertising identifiers) as well as what few cookies it can use to track ad response with what it claims is 85% of the accuracy of cookies on computers.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A new study reported by Robert Hof in this Forbes article reveals the power of in-app #advertising on mobile devices to get the attention of customers. Click through rates (#CTR) are twice as high on mobile apps versus websites. But clicks aren't everything, there are some clear caveats to consider as well that are also outlined by the author. A must read for brand managers placing ads on the web and on mobile devices. 

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Brands Are Wasting Their Money Hiring High-Priced Celebrities To Appear In Ads

Brands Are Wasting Their Money Hiring High-Priced Celebrities To Appear In Ads | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

This year's Super Bowl ads featured high-profile celebrity appearances from Ellen DeGeneres (Beats Music), Bob Dylan (Chrysler), and Scarlett Johansson (SodaStream), but a new report suggests those brands might have been better off saving their money.

 

The video technology firm Unruly tracks how and why people share video ads online. It found that just one of the game's five most-shared ads featured a big name endorsing a product. The finding was not limited to Super Bowl ads. Users are generally less likely to share ads in which big stars appear, Unruly found.

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Of the top 12 Superbowl ads only 3 featured #celebrities according to a recent Unruly study. The implications are that #brands would do better by spending the money on creating ad content that people want to share rather than paying for a celebrity.

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Philip Connor's curator insight, May 14, 3:18 AM

Interesting insight here from the Business Insider and also valuable information for all IMC students and professionals. This article illustrates to us that high-profile celebrities are not key to building brand equity through encouraging conversation among consumers. Providing consumers with valuable content seems more valuable in creating conversation about advertisements and a paticular brand.

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This Generic Brand Video Is The Greatest Thing About The Absolute Worst In Advertising

This Generic Brand Video Is The Greatest Thing About The Absolute Worst In Advertising | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Stock footage brand Dissolve puts its product to good use to call out lazy marketers peddling empty ideas.

 

It's just perfect. Everything is in there. The scientists with beakers, synonyms for progress, powerful rushing water, a baby, a blue-collar guy with dirt on his face, time-lapse footage of a city at night. Since the dawn of time, these have been the images used by marketers who just didn't quite manage to have an actual idea. The images, when combined with a solemn voiceover, form the basis of one of the most enduring, and enduringly bad, ad templates--the old "shoot-the-brief montage." Recently, it seems as though more and more advertisers are reaching for this chestnut, so this parody comes at a particularly good time.

 

To illustrate this marketing strategy equivalent of paint-by-numbers, stock video footage firm Dissolve took its goods and created a masterpiece with the words of Kendra Eash's brilliant McSweeney's piece.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Clearly the kind of "meaningless tripe" you will want to avoid in your #brand advertising.

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The Big Idea. Dead or Alive?

A lecture for an introductory creative class. I think it's a good thing to learn some history and have a frame of reference about how we got where we are today. This frames up the Big Idea from the days of Ogilvy and Lois to how creative ideas have and need to evolve.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A very useful review of the history and evolution of the #creative  "big idea" in #advertising.

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Branding Strategy Insider | Should Brand Advertising Tell The Truth?

Branding Strategy Insider | Should Brand Advertising Tell The Truth? | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

At its worst, and sadly in its most common expression, advertising is anything but inspiring or truthful – loud, intrusive, stupid, self-centered and above all boring.

 

If you look at some of the best advertising in the world, its purpose is often not to give consumers facts. It may have been once but in today’s world, with so many channels, instant search, review sites and social communities, the details and the realities are fairly easy to find elsewhere. The ads provide a cue and a logo to seek out more details elsewhere.

 

That’s hardly surprising. Media today is measured in bytes and memes. The key role of advertising now is to pitch an impression, a simple gem that catches people’s eyes and locks with a worldview that they have. Advertising seeks compatibility – on a range of fronts.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

But if the #advertising is not truthful, can there be #brand #trust?

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Greg Bonsib's curator insight, September 6, 2013 9:22 AM

No message is so important that people should despise how it’s conveyed to them.

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How Zara Ballooned Into a Multi-Billion Dollar Brand Without Advertising

How Zara Ballooned Into a Multi-Billion Dollar Brand Without Advertising | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

A look at spanish retailer zara's unique business model -- which includes barely any paid advertising -- in the wake of co-founder rosalia mera's death.

 

One of the most fascinating things about the brand is that it became popular not in spite of but because of its lack of originality; shoppers flocked to stores to buy its catwalk copycat designs at prices that are friendly enough for nearly any budget. Here, a few more fascinating facts about how Zara over three decades ballooned into a multi-billion brand*.


Via Sylvain Leroux
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Branding Strategy Insider | What Makes Brand Advertising Iconic?

Branding Strategy Insider | What Makes Brand Advertising Iconic? | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Many of us who started in advertising did so I imagine because we saw an ad or a series of commercials that made us dream of creating something that good, something that a whole culture talked about. Recently, the people at Hubspot reached back, took five of the great campaigns and had them reimagined for today.

 

It was an intriguing exercise. But while the creatives seemed to focus for the most part on how much the channels had changed in the time since the campaigns were forged and the implications of that for execution and campaign distribution, I thought it would be interesting to look at what some of these iconic ad campaigns did that made it possible for them to have such a deep cultural impact in the first place.

 

What’s clear is that iconic status is not about the nobility of the product. As CNBC observed, AdAge refers to its selection of the top advertising campaigns of the 20th century as including: “two air polluters, nutritionless sugar water, one reviled carcinogen, two companies infamous for the use of virtual slave labor, one purveyor of savory cardiovascular time bombs, two booze peddlers and one cosmetic product preying on the vanity of women.”

 

Nevertheless, the campaigns are considered paragons of advertising. Why? And more particularly, what can we learn from the success of those campaigns?

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A good discussion about the various factors [unique stories, #meme creation, #disruptive, #symbolic] that make some #brand advertising campaigns iconic.

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How Consumer Messaging Is Going From ‘Push’ to ‘Pull’ | Street Fight

How Consumer Messaging Is Going From ‘Push’ to ‘Pull’ | Street Fight | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

The biggest battle coming in the world of marketing is a 180-degree shift in the routing of commerce-related messages. Today, we call them “advertisements,” one-directional messages FROM somebody with something to sell TO somebody who may potentially be a buyer. Tomorrow, the messages will come FROM those wishing to buy TO those with something to sell.

 

This is the vision of Project VRM (Vendor Relationship Management, as opposed to CRM — Customer Relationship Management), Doc Searls’ ingenious concept of using the Web to turn advertising on its head by putting transactional power in the hands of the buyers. If you’re not up-to-speed on VRM, now’s the time to get started.

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Tesla's media strategy: build a brand without spending on advertising

Tesla's media strategy: build a brand without spending on advertising | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

It's been quite a week for Tesla Motors (TSLA). The Palo Alto-based electric car company claimed it reached profitability for the first time, saw its stock close at an all-time high, unveiled a new financing program and celebrated the opening of its expanded showroom in San Jose's Santana Row.

 

And much of the action was driven by CEO Elon Musk's bold, brash and unconventional use of social media. The man who helped change the Internet by cofounding PayPal is proving just as determined to change the rules for how public companies communicate -- even as the Securities and Exchange Commission wrestles with how to bring those rules into the 21st Century.

 

"Elon Musk is a marketing genius, in our view," said Adam Jonas, an analyst who covers Tesla for Morgan Stanley. "A tactful use of social media means a tiny car company has the best known financing program on the planet.... Mainstream OEMs (original equipment manufacturers) are being taken to school here."

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Case Study.

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Charlotte Johnson's curator insight, April 8, 2013 1:38 PM

With the prevalence of social media Telsa motors has come up with a way of building a brand that does not cost anything. CEO Elon Musk has been innovative and risky using social media to release information about the company and has managed to affect share prices through the use of twitter. Although social media use by CEOS is "fraught with landmines" regarding their legal and moral obligations it seems to be working for Telsa who have reported producing higher volumes while other electric car companies have faltered. Social media Is an easier and cheaper way to reach consumers and telsa has found a way to build their brand around it. 

PHAM THU NGA's comment, April 8, 2013 3:08 PM
I agree that building the brand through social media is cost-effective method. It's cheap and easy way to reach a large audiences. However it is also hard to control and quite risky. If the business learns how to use the advantages to the fullest and prevent the disadvantages to the least, it will be very profitable and efficient way to promote your brand.
Jess Tracey's comment, April 8, 2013 5:20 PM
Connecting with consumers over social media is a great way to build relationships with consumers and in turn build brand loyalty, however as J said, advertising only through social media is quite risky. Building strong relationships with consumers and understanding their needs and wants is one of the core concepts of IMC, and using social media is a great way for Telsa to gain these relationships, but is using solely social media as advertising a good idea for such a high involvement product?
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9 inspiring ads that broke down stereotypes (single page view) - iMediaConnection.com

9 inspiring ads that broke down stereotypes (single page view) - iMediaConnection.com | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Brand messaging has long permeated our culture. In the 1960s, American girls grew up believing that "blondes have more fun" and if you "give her a Hoover, you give her the best."

 

Mad Men-era ads promoting lotions and dishwashing liquids extolled the terror of turning 30. Ladies, your hands and face will dry up like a crustacean if you do not moisturize constantly. In the words of an old lotion ad, "Would you want to hold hands with a lobster?"


While a lot of progress has been made in the last 50 years, sexism and ageism obviously haven't disappeared from advertising. A woman, regardless of color, is often portrayed in limited capacities. She's young mommy calmly strapping her kid into a minivan or she's the mom with a Mona Lisa smile pulling out a fried, frozen chicken dish proud of her cleverness at meal problem-solving. Invariably, this includes a Martha Stewart look that has sustained for 25 years: blue work shirts and khakis. 
 
If a woman is over 30, she is plopped on a couch chatting about her intestinal bacteria with Jamie Lee Curtis or doling out sage cleaning tips. If she's under 30, she's the large breasted, slim-hipped "up for anything" sexpot who paaarrrties with a cold round of brew. This is the same woman who, upon turning 45, becomes the patient, yet loving "up for anything" spouse of her tired, irritable, cannot get anything up, 50-plus partner of erectile dysfunction prescription drug ads. And all of these white gals do yoga!

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

This article reviews some of the progress made by some brands to remove the use of sex and age based stereotypes in advertising. It contains some very good examples.

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Sophie Bloomfield's curator insight, August 12, 6:33 PM

These brands have made a bold move by confronting stereotypes. Not only do I applaud them from an ethical viewpoint, but it's also interesting to see that these risky ads have sparked a lot of social conversation about their brands; both good and bad. Is any attention good attention?

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Kit Kat Just Created Its Own Unofficial Lego Set, and It's Awesome

Kit Kat Just Created Its Own Unofficial Lego Set, and It's Awesome | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it
Break me off a piece of this awesome homage to Lego from the marketing folks at Kit Kat. Chances are, whenever you eat a Kit Kat, you think to yourself, "Now if only I could deconstruct this candy bar and construct insane little creatures out of the pieces." Well, your oddly specific dream can now be a reality.
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Check out this unique brand advertising by Kit-Kat that turns a Kit-Kat bar into a Lego set. No word yet on their availability. 

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MediaPost Publications Marketers Profit When Search, Social Ad Efforts Combined 11/25/2013

MediaPost Publications Marketers Profit When Search, Social Ad Efforts Combined 11/25/2013 | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Marketers have argued for years about the benefits of social marketing tied to search campaigns. A recent study with Facebook hopes to put those debates to rest, although the search agency conducting the study with a major retail client has yet to test the concept with Twitter and other social sites.

 

Research from Kenshoo suggests that if agencies and brands want more from Facebook ads, they might just get it by combining the campaigns with search engine marketing ads. The white paper "Added Value: Facebook Advertising Boosts Paid Search Performance" examines the direct impact of Facebook advertising on paid-search marketing performance.

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Cross channel synergies revealed in recent research of multichannel #advertising efforts.

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Marketers Put More Work in the Hands of In-House Agencies

Marketers Put More Work in the Hands of In-House Agencies | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

Client-side marketers in the US are moving more advertising and marketing business in-house, according to research. Cost-cutting is driving many of these changes, as is the proliferation of new marketing channels, which require more dedicated staff.

 

A growing contingent of client-side marketers are turning to in-house agencies to take more ownership of their advertising and marketing strategy.

 

According to an Association of National Advertisers (ANA) survey, 58% of US client-side marketers said their company used an in-house agency this year, compared to only 42% who five years earlier said the same. And 56% of respondents said in May 2013 that in the past three years, they had moved at least some established business previously handled by an external agency to their in-house agency.

 

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A review of recent research conducted by the Association of National Advertisers (#ANA) reveals the pros and cons of a growing trend toward greater in-house control of #advertising and #brand marketing.

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Emotional Advertising must start with an Emotional Brief

Emotional Advertising must start with an Emotional Brief | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

As Brand Leaders are starting to see the value in being more emotionally connected, we see them going to their agencies asking for more emotional advertising and communication.  Of course the agency would love to do emotional work.  So it’s off to the races?   Well, not quite.  Three weeks later, all the emotional ads get rejected.  The problem is the brief, which had zero emotion.  These emotional ads developed by the creative teams were just random emotional ads, not connected to any real consumer insight or any desired emotional space the brand can own.  


To do great emotional advertising that is on strategy with the brand, there must be a brief that starts with how the consumer feels now (consumer insights) and defines how we want the consumer to feel after they experience advertising (an emotional desired response).  

Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A very insightful discussion for the need to identify the emotional benefits a #brand wants to deliver before commiting to an #advertising campaign. Also contains a link to a Slideshare presentation on writing a #creative brief.

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Belinda Summers's comment, September 3, 2013 1:59 AM
Humanizing your brand makes wonders :)
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s comment, September 3, 2013 2:18 PM
Delivering an emotionally charged benefit to a brand user enhances the strength of loyalty, attachment, and brand trust.
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Infographic: The Rapidly Growing Digital Advertising Market - Marketing Technology Blog

Infographic: The Rapidly Growing Digital Advertising Market - Marketing Technology Blog | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

We met with a non-profit last week in our office who have developed an incredible following on Facebook. However, their approved budget only has line items for television and radio advertisements as their overall marketing budget. This is an issue with many non-profits… directors are a bit complicit as they direct budgets based on grants that have been around for decades.

 

It’s not that we’re poo-pooing television and radio (we do a segment on radio), it’s just that they’re expensive mediums that need to be properly deployed as part of an overall marketing mix. Digital media offers low-cost, high yield opportunities – especially with non-profit organizations where the employees and customers are so passionate. Online media offers the opportunity for you to spark the fire, and your fans and followers to spread it. It’s truly unlike any traditional source.

 

When the average person is exposed to 3,000 advertising messages a day, you want to make sure that your advertising vehicle will get you to the target that you want. The Internet’s ease of access has created a large search gateway for customer’s needing your product or service. Upon balancing the prices of Internet advertising with its benefits, it’s easy to see why this is not a market to ignore.

The quote above and the infographic below from the Advice Interactive Group is a comprehensive look at the growth of digital marketing over time with respect to traditional media.

 



Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

A useful summary #stats of the size and trends in the #digital #advertising marketplace.

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Sophie Batten's curator insight, August 21, 2013 9:26 PM

My insight is that these days more and more people are using the internet and less people are using television and radio. The internet is seen by consumers to be easier and more direct than television and radio. However this effects marketers that pay for advertising on television and on the radio because each day the audience they are creating these advertisements for are getting smaller and smaller and starting to be a waste of money. This is why more advertising are starting to be seen on the internet, advertisements are increasing on popular used sites such as Youtube and Facebook and its not a suprise since it costs less and is more actively used.

 

Teagan Adams's comment, August 21, 2013 10:27 PM
I agree with Sophie that a lot of money is being spent on advertising in domains that has shrinking audiences. Makes people wonder how much longer until internet advertising will become expensive considering its success.
Analay Malamala's comment, August 22, 2013 1:51 AM
I agree with your insight Sophie when you say that there is more use of the internet and less of traditional media like television and radio, I think that it's a much better way of communication for consumers to jump on the internet, it's accessible and because the world is evolving, our knowledge of different platforms evolve too and therefore we stick to what we feel more confident to use and think is most effective.
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Report: Mobile Users Want Value from Ads

Report: Mobile Users Want Value from Ads | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

From the report, Exploring the Role of Value in Mobile Advertising What do mobile users expect from ads? A new study says that many mobile users want something of value in exchange for their attention.

 

According to the report, Exploring the Role of Value in Mobile Advertising, there’s a wide range of possible values. They could include the most popular value choice — deals and coupons — or free tools such as shopping lists, interest-based info like recipes, such location-based info as promotions, a branded game or similar fun feature, or the latest product news.

 

The report was conducted by research agency Millward Brown, in partnership with mobile loyalty platform and ad network SessionM, and it is a continuation of Millward Brown’s 2012 U.S. AdReaction Report, Marketing in the Mobile World.

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The Most Annoying Types of Ads on the Internet #infographic /@BerriePelser

The Most Annoying Types of Ads on the Internet #infographic /@BerriePelser | Integrated Brand Communications | Scoop.it

The Most Annoying Types of Ads on the Internet #infographic

Pop-up ads, lottery scams, and other types of advertising do more than just interrupt the flow of information online. Respondents to a recent survey on annoying ads have reported losing sleep and even assaulting their hardware after reading yet another email from a pen pal in a foreign land who needs them to transfer some money.

Although a greater number of Americans (60 percent) are annoyed by television commercials than internet ads, the newer medium is on the rise, with 55 percent who are finding annoying ads in their inboxes and 37 percent who say they are happening on social media.

The most offensive kinds are:

Pop-up ads – 70%Lottery scams – 70%Male enhancement ads – 66%Emails from deceased African leaders who have left them money – 64%Ads for products and services they do not need – 58%Female enhancement ads – 54%
Via WordPress SEO & Social Media
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s insight:

Cautionary note for brand managers--ads to avoid.

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WordPress SEO & Social Media's curator insight, April 15, 2013 2:03 AM

The Most Annoying Types of Ads on the Internet #infographic /@BerriePelser