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How to Do a Close Reading

How to Do a Close Reading | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Step by step instructions on how to read for meaning using Robert Newton's 'Runner' as an example. With thanks to Lisa McNeice.

Via Mary Clark
Carol Geddis's insight:

A good model for one way of doing close reading, though some kids may get "highlighter happy".

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Darren Burris's comment, April 3, 2013 10:25 AM
Agreed. It is a model and does show some key actions in the close reading process. Why I rescooped it!
Sarah McElrath's comment, April 3, 2013 12:17 PM
Whether you have students go through and highlight isn't as important as the idea of going through a text multiple times and looking for different things. Some of the steps looked at the word choice, but some of the steps looked for themes and connections. All of that plays a part in what makes a text work--or not. Plus, note the last step which says, "now you are ready to discuss the text." So I think students and teachers can still get to the "contrast of darkness and spirit" or any other point that seems important. And would teachers do this on all texts? No, probably not. But if you started by having students practice going through and looking for different things, eventually they may gain the mindset that deep reading includes multiple readings, looking at different aspects of that text. And for younger students -- concrete is good. Start with the concrete and move to the higher level thinking.
Teresa Carvalho's curator insight, October 17, 2013 9:13 PM

A really user-friendly guide to use in our classes. We can use short, interesting and meaningful texts for that purpose. 

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Studying With Quizzes Helps Make Sure the Material Sticks

Studying With Quizzes Helps Make Sure the Material Sticks | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists have known for a long time that regular quizzing on information helps make it stick, but students and teachers don't always know how to apply that research to classroom practice or study habits.
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Resources and Downloads for Differentiated Instruction

Resources and Downloads for Differentiated Instruction | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Educators from Mesquite Elementary School, in Tucson, Arizona, have provided these resources for you to use in your own school.
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Finding the Beauty in Math

Finding the Beauty in Math | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
How does a person fall in love with math? For too many, math class conjures up anxious worksheets filled with rows of unanswered problems. Students go along, seeming to perform the steps required -- plug in the formulas, solve for x -- without ever understanding what they’re doing, or why.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Growth Mindset: Personal Accountability and Reflection

Growth Mindset: Personal Accountability and Reflection | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
I am an adjunct faculty for several teacher education and educational technology programs.  I have been so for a few decades.  During that time I have noticed the changing nature of student behavio...

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 13, 7:45 PM

Do you discuss growth mindset with your students? Do you also discuss what a fixed mindset is? In this post Jackie Gerstein provides her insights into these areas, and also talks about the grwoth of what she defines as a "toxic mindset" where a students might think:

  • Mediocre is often good enough for me as long as I get the work done.

We are fortunate that she has also provided a "Personal Accountability and Reflection" series of questions, which is shown in the infographic above, and also listed in the post. Below are two of the questions.

  • Did I work as hard as I could have?
  • Did I regulate my procrastination, distractions, and temptations in order to complete my work?

These are great questions to use with your students. How do you think  your students would answer them? Would they acknowledge how they are working accurately?

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, September 14, 1:41 PM

Thx Beth Dichter

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5 Tools to Introduce Programming to Kids

5 Tools to Introduce Programming to Kids | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
It's hard to argue with the importance of teaching students how to use computers -- how to turn on, log on, search the Web, and use applications.
Via Digital Maverick
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Teaching Kids to Code

Teaching Kids to Code | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Every era demands--and rewards--different skills.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Digital Maverick
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, May 17, 2013 6:38 AM

In this collection, we share perspectives on coding from a university professor's vantage (MIT's Mitch Resnick describes why learning to code is like learning to learn) to an elementary school's point of view (Sheena Vaidyanathan describes the program for sixth graders in Los Altos, Calif.), and other points in between.

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Why is math easier for some kids than for others? | The Rundown | PBS NewsHour

Why is math easier for some kids than for others? | The Rundown | PBS NewsHour | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine found that when kids begin processing mental math, the brain reorganizes itself to use its short-term memory center, the hippocampus. Continue reading →
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Catholic schools’ secret: love

Catholic schools’ secret: love | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
These days much of my life is decided by two nuns. My children spend their days with them. My nights and weekends are largely determined by the sports and dances…
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16HabitsofMind1.jpg (1024x768 pixels)

16HabitsofMind1.jpg (1024x768 pixels) | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Carol Geddis's insight:

The 16 Habits of Mind poster.  Great for reminding teachers and students about all that learning encompasses.

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7 Myths About Rigor In The Classroom

7 Myths About Rigor In The Classroom | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 13, 10:40 PM

One of the buzzwords in education today is rigor, but what does that mean? This post shares seven myths about rigor, providing a deeper look at each one if you click through. What are these myths? Three are below.

* Is asking students to do a lot of homework a sign of rigor? Not if it is busy work, or if it leads to burnout. Although parents may define it as rigor what do you think?

* Rigor is not for everyone. How do we help students if we request less of them? Rigor may not be the same for each student but each student should be asked to reach their highest level.

* Standards alone take care of rigor. The Common Core Standards tell us they will increase rigor, but it is the instruction that will make this happen, not the standard.

Much more information on this issue is available in the post.

Kirsten Macaulay's curator insight, January 15, 7:20 AM

Very true. A must read.

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5 Questions To Evaluate Curriculum For Rigor

5 Questions To Evaluate Curriculum For Rigor | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it

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Leslie Minton's curator insight, January 24, 7:52 AM

Rigor across curriculum content, not just a particular subject matter is essential to effective teaching and learning. It is knowing what rigor is in order to determine if it exists.

Nancy Jones's curator insight, January 24, 8:59 PM

This iactually the second article of a series . This is a  word used frequently, but it's definition varies.  I  think rigor need to also differentiate , say, reading levels so each learner is challenged from the level they are currently at. Rigor does not mean, "one size fits all!"

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 25, 3:03 AM

A text does not the curriculum make. The curriculum is what the children learn and mesh with their lived history. The ultimate test is Life and all its manifestions according to Alfred North Whitehead.

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On-the-Spot Scaffolding for Students

On-the-Spot Scaffolding for Students | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
On-the-spot scaffolding is an essential skill for teachers. Check out these three strategies for assisting students when they struggle.
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Nurturing the Innovator's Mindset in Your Classroom

Nurturing the Innovator's Mindset in Your Classroom | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Teach the mindset of innovation through example, iteration, failure, and reflection, and cultivate your students' curiosity and determination to try something different.
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20 Google tools teachers should try (and how to use them in classrooms) - Daily Genius

20 Google tools teachers should try (and how to use them in classrooms) - Daily Genius | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Share on FacebookTweet ThisGoogle+Pin ItLinkedIn There’s a reason teachers like Google tools. They’re free, easy to use, and you already have an account on basically all of them. Add in the fact that Google is making a huge push into the world of teacher tools and you quickly realize it’s a good time to be …

Via Adelina Silva, Javier Sánchez Bolado, ThePinkSalmon, Suvi Salo, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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What most schools don't teach

What most schools don't teach | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Learn about a new "superpower" that isn't being taught in 90% of US schools.
Carol Geddis's insight:

Teaching kids to code!

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The Growth Mindset: The Important Concept NOT Taught Under the Common Core

The Growth Mindset: The Important Concept NOT Taught Under the Common Core | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 15, 9:36 PM

Who knew that the Growth Mindset is just one component of the Academic Mindsets? (My answer would be "not me.") Having stumbled on this post from mimio I knew I had to share it. Learn about three other mindsets that our students need to be aware of:

* Self-Efficacy

* Sense of Belonging

* Relevance

Are these mindsets you use in our classroom? How might you incorporate them? What will your students think about them? 

Click through to read more.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, September 16, 10:23 PM

Thx Beth Dichter!

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Scratch | Project | Scratch 2.0 Overview

Scratch | Project | Scratch 2.0 Overview | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Scratch: a programming language for everyone. Create interactive stories, games, music and art - and share them online.

Via Digital Maverick
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5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
To inspire more inquiry in the classroom, blogger Rebecca Alber offers up five questions to routinely ask students.
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Avoiding Common Mistakes When Implementing SEL

Avoiding Common Mistakes When Implementing SEL | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Social and emotional learning expert Dr. Maurice Elias describes SEL implementation challenges and offers up suggestions for overcoming these common obstacles.
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My Reflections on Implementation of the Common Core

My Reflections on Implementation of the Common Core | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
In our system, we are moving to full implementation of the Common Core State Standards in English language arts beginning in the 2013-2014 school year.  We have spent the past couple of years in va...
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Writing in Middle School: A Unit of Study Approach to Teaching the Common Core

Writing in Middle School: A Unit of Study Approach to Teaching the Common Core | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it

"This article focuses on the unit of study as an inquiry-based instructional framework supporting students’ development as writers in single-subject areas or across disciplines. As teacher educators, we collaborate with teachers and students in a variety of middle grades settings, and we have found this framework works well for a diverse range of learners, enhancing their motivation, engagement, and growth as writers. In addition, a unit of study approach to teaching writing can help students meet the new Common Core State Standards for writing."


Via Mel Riddile, MrTVaughn
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16 Strategies For Integrating The Habits of Mind In The Classroom

16 Strategies For Integrating The Habits of Mind In The Classroom | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it

"In outcomes-based learning environments, we generally see three elements in play: 1) learning objectives or targets are created from given standards; 2) instruction of some kind is given; and then 3) learning results are assessed. These assessments offer data to inform the revision of further planned instruction. Rinse and repeat.

But lost in this clinical sequence are the Habits of Mind that (often predictably) lead to success or failure in the mastery of given standards. In fact, it is not in the standards or assessments, but rather these personal habits where success or failure — in academic terms — actually begin."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 3, 10:23 PM

Many of us discuss Bloom's taxonomy with students (although we may not refer to it using that terminology) but how many of us talk about Habits of Mind with our students. This post explores how we can use habits of mind to help our students providing suggestions as to how you might help your students learn them.

To see the full poster of the Habits of Mind: http://indysintriguingideas.edublogs.org/files/2010/08/16HabitsofMind1.jpg

Authentis Formations's curator insight, January 5, 5:14 AM

Pour une bonne reprise...

Kimberly House's curator insight, January 6, 3:06 AM

I echo Beth Dichter's comments. This is vocabulary we should be using with our students. Identifying habits and ways if thinking that lead to learning. 

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Infographics as Assessments for Nonfiction Reading

Infographics as Assessments for Nonfiction Reading | Instructional Strategies and Learning Resources | Scoop.it
This past weekend, my step-daughter Emily, who works in the field of non-profit fundraising, asked me out of the blue, "Do you you ever teach your students about infographics?" I beamed with pride as I showed off my students' hard work.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 24, 10:15 PM

In this post learn how a teacher took a project where students created an infographic on a non-fiction book and took it from being a "nice digital poster" and observed students whom had finished early poll their classmates and create infographics that included their new results. To quote from the post "These students had made a leap of understanding I hadn’t asked for: the images on an infographic were meant to convey data and information with the powerful impact of visual design."

Read the post to learn about the process that followed and how you might have your students create infographic in your classroom for an assessment.

The Rice Process's curator insight, January 25, 11:50 AM

Infographics can be an effective assesment across the board.