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Tweet from @KathyPerret

Tweet from @KathyPerret | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
RT @KathyPerret: Question to guide a coaches reflections on Instruction. #educoach http://t.co/smeTzH9qKK

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Companies headed by introverts performed better in a study of thousands of CEOs

Companies headed by introverts performed better in a study of thousands of CEOs | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it

The type of CEO who lands on the cover of business magazines has a big, outgoing personality, all the better to charm investors, win over partners and rally employees. But what if companies run by extroverts did poorly? What if companies fared better in the hands of introverts? 


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David Hain's curator insight, August 9, 12:03 PM

Myth busted! B***S*** doesn't always baffle brains!

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 9, 5:29 PM

Interesting, could the be better classified as ambiverts?

JASON CAVNESS's curator insight, August 10, 2:49 PM
It would seem introverts perform extroverts as CEOs and in my opinion as leaders in general. But of course being an introvert, I am biased.
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Listen Current – Listening that sparks learning.

Listen Current – Listening that sparks learning. | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
Free lessons and educational podcasts for your classroom.
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Visualizing 21st-Century Classroom Design

Visualizing 21st-Century Classroom Design | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
These five steps are essential in creating a 21st-century classroom: establishing zones, ensuring resource accessibility, encouraging mobility, igniting inspiration, and fostering respect.
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Listen Current – Listening that sparks learning.

Listen Current – Listening that sparks learning. | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
Free lessons and educational podcasts for your classroom.
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5-Minute Film Fest: Getting Started With Classroom Apps

5-Minute Film Fest: Getting Started With Classroom Apps | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
Need a bit of help bringing apps into your classroom? This video playlist and resource collection will help you get started using apps with your students.
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5 Apps to Transform Teaching and Personalize Learning

5 Apps to Transform Teaching and Personalize Learning | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
With digital tools like Nearpod, Classkick, Educreations, Explain Everything, and Seesaw, teachers can leverage student-centered, personalized learning in whole-group instruction, guided and independent practice, and reflection.
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Some Very Good Educational Resources for Social Studies Teachers via @Medkh9

Some Very Good Educational Resources for Social Studies Teachers via @Medkh9 | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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What's Hot, What's Not in 2016 -- THE Journal

What's Hot, What's Not in 2016 -- THE Journal | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
Our expert panelists weigh in on education technology to give us their verdict on which approaches to tech-enabled learning will have a major impact, which ones are stagnating and which ones might be better forgotten entirely.
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Growth mindset guru Carol Dweck says teachers and parents often use her research incorrectly - The Hechinger Report

Growth mindset guru Carol Dweck says teachers and parents often use her research incorrectly - The Hechinger Report | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
Stanford psychology professor Carol Dweck has become something of a cult figure in education and parenting circles. Her research into boosting student motivation has spawned a mini industry of consultants, sold more than a million books and changed the way that many adults praise children. Dweck believes too many students are hobbled by the belief that intelligence …

 

Praising effort alone 

Many parents and teachers have interpreted Dweck’s work to mean that they should praise a child’s effort, such as “I’m proud that you tried really hard,” or “I see how much effort you put into this.” Or teachers sometimes give A’s on assignments if a child has attempted all of the questions, regardless of whether the answers are good or not.

“It’s like the consolation prize. ‘Oh, at least you worked hard,'” said Dweck. “What if they didn’t make progress or they didn’t learn?”

Praising effort alone, she says, is useless when the child is getting everything wrong and not making progress. Either students will feel misled when they are eventually confronted with the reality of their low achievement, or the hollow praise will convey adults’ low expectations for them.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=carol+dweck

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 


Via Gust MEES
Dixie Binford's insight:

Implementation with fidelity is important when new strategies from research comes to the classroom.  We often "cherry-pick" what we feel comfortable with but it is necessary to "lean in" and implement as intended by the author or researcher.  Be committed to self-reflection and evaluation of the progress you see in students.  Adjust, refine and commit to improving your execution.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 24, 2015 2:28 PM
Stanford psychology professor Carol Dweck has become something of a cult figure in education and parenting circles. Her research into boosting student motivation has spawned a mini industry of consultants, sold more than a million books and changed the way that many adults praise children. Dweck believes too many students are hobbled by the belief that intelligence …


Praising effort alone 

Many parents and teachers have interpreted Dweck’s work to mean that they should praise a child’s effort, such as “I’m proud that you tried really hard,” or “I see how much effort you put into this.” Or teachers sometimes give A’s on assignments if a child has attempted all of the questions, regardless of whether the answers are good or not.

“It’s like the consolation prize. ‘Oh, at least you worked hard,'” said Dweck. “What if they didn’t make progress or they didn’t learn?”

Praising effort alone, she says, is useless when the child is getting everything wrong and not making progress. Either students will feel misled when they are eventually confronted with the reality of their low achievement, or the hollow praise will convey adults’ low expectations for them.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=carol+dweck


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset


Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, November 25, 2015 11:55 AM

Effort without results is hardly better for learning than results without effort.

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, November 27, 2015 6:57 PM

It's important that praise be aligned with relevant and useful feedback. All learners need to know what they are doing right, and what they are getting wrong, in order to progress.

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3 things teachers need to stop doing | Stop, Start, Continue: Conceptual Understanding Meets Applied Problem Solving

3 things teachers need to stop doing | Stop, Start, Continue: Conceptual Understanding Meets Applied Problem Solving | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
To better understand how educating individuals can make a global difference, consider what we should stop doing, what we should start doing, and what we should continue doing.

 

What Should We Stop Doing?Stop teaching as if we have the answers.Stop rushing.Stop talking.What Should We Start Doing?Start looking for problems to solve, actions to take, and beauty to create.Start seeking out authentic, high-stakes audiences for student work.

 

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 19, 2015 7:40 PM

To better understand how educating individuals can make a global difference, consider what we should stop doing, what we should start doing, and what we should continue doing.


What Should We Stop Doing?Stop teaching as if we have the answers.Stop rushing.Stop talking.What Should We Start Doing?Start looking for problems to solve, actions to take, and beauty to create.Start seeking out authentic, high-stakes audiences for student work.




Daniel Christian's curator insight, November 20, 2015 9:47 AM

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30 Habits Of Highly Effective Teachers

30 Habits Of Highly Effective Teachers | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
30 Habits Of Highly Effective Teachers
Dixie Binford's insight:

These are great reminders of the enormity of our job.  Our humanity is perhaps the most important aspect our students need from us.

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How Audiobooks Can Help Kids Who Struggle with Reading by Linda Flanagan

How Audiobooks Can Help Kids Who Struggle with Reading by Linda Flanagan | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
By Linda Flanagan

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, November 1, 2:28 PM
Audio books and pod casts are great for English language learners as well!  Not only with reading, but pronunciation and fluency as well.
Julian Diaz's curator insight, November 6, 2:23 PM
Could an audio actually help children to improve their reading skills?

When I first saw the tittle of this article, it came to my mind my early school years when the teachers or my parents punished me because my reading skills were really bad, even nowadays, I don't enjoy that much the reading, it's easier for me if I listen the information, rather than reading it.

This happens nowadays to a lot of children and a good strategie to improve their reading skills is playing an audio-book while they read the book itslef, thus they don't have to encode every single word, their pronunciation could improve, and they learn to read very fast as well.

Another reason for which teachers and parents should take into account this strategy, is that it can actually help acquiring new languages, since if you play an audio in any language to a child in an early age, the children could learn it just as he/she learns the mother tongue.

I consider that this is a very good strategie to help children with low reading skills and I plan to implment it in my future classes.


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Show What You Know: From PBL to Digital Portfolios

Show What You Know: From PBL to Digital Portfolios | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
My son's birthday party this year was at one of those bounce house places with children hopped up on orange soda and birthday cake. In the midst of the chaos, one of the workers approached me—not with the news of some disaster, as I immediately feared, but with a smile and a huge hug. "Mrs. Chandler!"
Teachers who live in the community where they work experience this all the time—hugs and greetings from past and present students. However, this was different. This time th
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The Teacher Curse No One Wants to Talk About

The Teacher Curse No One Wants to Talk About | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
By incorporating facts, novelty, examples, analogies, and emotion; and cycling content, telling content-related stories, and making lessons multisensory, we can make learning easier for our students.
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17 Great Apps That'll Make Your Life Easier via Sean Kim

17 Great Apps That'll Make Your Life Easier via Sean Kim | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
Always looking for new ways to get more done at work, and quickly? Check at these 17 apps to boost your productivity throughout the work week.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Dr. Pyrate's curator insight, June 16, 9:12 AM
Edtech possibilities abound.
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7 Reading Readiness Apps for Special Needs Students

7 Reading Readiness Apps for Special Needs Students | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
Here are seven apps to help special needs students toward reading readiness, touchscreen games that engage children through play with colors, shapes, animation, alphabet sequencing, and sentence structure.
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How Students’ Digital Footprints Can Affect Them Long After They Leave Your School by Jackie Myers

How Students’ Digital Footprints Can Affect Them Long After They Leave Your School  by Jackie Myers | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
by Jackie Myers

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Being right isn’t always the goal

Being right isn’t always the goal | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
Different viewpoints are based off of the unique approaches, biases and
inclinations that we bring to situations. However, where we get ourselves
into trouble, particularly in the workplace, is when we assume that our
perspective is the only one that exists, let alone the only one that
matters.

Such narrow thinking can be even more damaging for leaders. Not only does
it prevent them from grasping opportunities and identifying challenges that
only others are attuned to, but it can lead to discontent and frustration
in others who do not feel heard or valued.

How can we make sure to avoid such thinking and ensure that we not only
become more mindful of other views but actively seek them out?
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Student Voice Comes With Teachers as Listeners | LEARNing To LEARN

Student Voice Comes With Teachers as Listeners | LEARNing To LEARN | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it

This piece was actually sparked by an interview of Lady Gaga by Soledad O' Brien at the Born This Way Emotion Revolution Summit where Gaga stated, "It's time to stop telling learners what to do and 

start listening for we can do for them.”

 

One of those accepted practices, sadly, in most educational settings is that the teacher is the authority to be respected and listened to without question. Listening to students is not a practice that is often taught in teacher education programs.

 

There is a current movement, in some circles, to promote and honor student voice.  But, and this is a huge but, if educators are serious about honoring student voice, they need to first learn how to listen, really listen to their students.

Students who are given a voice in setting goals gain ownership in what they’re learning. Teachers who listen to what students tell them they need to learn gain more than just a better understanding of the children they teach — they gain clarity on their roadmap to better teaching. And when conversations about teaching and learning are allowed to happen, teachers and students develop mutual trust and high expectations. (Want to Improve Teaching? Listen to Students)

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/05/29/practice-put-students-in-the-drivers-seat-how-to/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=students+voice


 

 


Via Gust MEES
Dixie Binford's insight:

As I visit classrooms, I see teachers working hard at lecturing and students passively receiving.  A few students may be actively taking notes of some kind but most are just listening, maybe.  In John Hattie's , Visible Learning (pp.43-44), one of the most effective predictors of student performance is the student's own reporting of his/her level of knowledge of the content.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 19, 2015 7:52 PM

This piece was actually sparked by an interview of Lady Gaga by Soledad O' Brien at the Born This Way Emotion Revolution Summit where Gaga stated, "It's time to stop telling learners what to do and 

start listening for we can do for them.”


One of those accepted practices, sadly, in most educational settings is that the teacher is the authority to be respected and listened to without question. Listening to students is not a practice that is often taught in teacher education programs.


There is a current movement, in some circles, to promote and honor student voice.  But, and this is a huge but, if educators are serious about honoring student voice, they need to first learn how to listen, really listen to their students.

Students who are given a voice in setting goals gain ownership in what they’re learning. Teachers who listen to what students tell them they need to learn gain more than just a better understanding of the children they teach — they gain clarity on their roadmap to better teaching. And when conversations about teaching and learning are allowed to happen, teachers and students develop mutual trust and high expectations. (Want to Improve Teaching? Listen to Students)

Learn more:


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/05/29/practice-put-students-in-the-drivers-seat-how-to/


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=students+voice



Mauro Marino Jiménez's curator insight, November 25, 2015 8:37 AM

Para docentes

Prometheus's curator insight, December 3, 2015 2:41 PM
Listening to students is important. The emphasis on this and it's repercussions for learning in the classroom are something that ties in with the Te Kotahitanga program that is in place across school in New Zealand. Getting to know students and developing relationships with them for me has always been key and listening to students is an essential part of this.
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How Relearning Old Concepts Alongside New Ones Makes It All Stick | LEARNing To LEARN

How Relearning Old Concepts Alongside New Ones Makes It All Stick | LEARNing To LEARN | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it

Image credit: http://rebelbrown.com/rebelations/2015/03/05/lead-away-resistance-change.html

 

Schmidt explains that repetitive drilling on the same task is called “block practice.” You do the same thing, over and over, in one block of activity. He argues that a better way to learn is to practice several new things in succession, a technique called “variable practice” or “interleaving.”

 

There’s a broad feeling that we could learn better, our kids could learn better, that it’s important,” Bjork said. “And everything we’re seeing here suggests that schools could be more effective. People could learn much more effectively than they’re learning.”

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Unlearning

 

 

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 29, 2015 6:40 PM

Image credit: http://rebelbrown.com/rebelations/2015/03/05/lead-away-resistance-change.html


Schmidt explains that repetitive drilling on the same task is called “block practice.” You do the same thing, over and over, in one block of activity. He argues that a better way to learn is to practice several new things in succession, a technique called “variable practice” or “interleaving.”


There’s a broad feeling that we could learn better, our kids could learn better, that it’s important,” Bjork said. “And everything we’re seeing here suggests that schools could be more effective. People could learn much more effectively than they’re learning.”


Learn more:


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Unlearning


DeTrice Rodgers's curator insight, November 30, 2015 1:59 AM

#nuued  www.nuued.com Sign up for the Free App

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50 Resources For Teaching With Bloom's Taxonomy -

50 Resources For Teaching With Bloom's Taxonomy - | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it
50 Resources For Teaching With Bloom’s Taxonomy by TeachThought Staff Bloom’s Taxonomy was a remarkable attempt to create a system of learning that focuses on how people learn and organize...
Dixie Binford's insight:

Our students need to be able to think critically in every subject area. Here are some great resources out there for teachers to truly get into meta-cognition.

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Teacher Agency: Educators Moving from a Fixed to a Growth Mindset

Teacher Agency:  Educators Moving from a Fixed to a Growth Mindset | All Things Classroom | Scoop.it

It is a myth that we operate under a set of oppressive bureaucratic constraints. In reality, teachers have a great deal of autonomy in the work they chose to do in their classrooms. In most cases it is our culture that provides the constraints. For individual teachers, trying out new practices and pedagogy is risky business and both our culture, and our reliance on hierarchy, provide the ideal barriers for change not to occur. As Pogo pointed out long ago, “we have met the enemy and it is us.” http://www.cea-ace.ca/blog/brian-harrison/2013/09/5/stop-asking-permission-change

Educational psychology has focused on the concepts of learned helplessness and more currently growth-fixed mindsets as a way to explain how and why students give up in the classroom setting.  These ideas can also be applied to educators in this day of forced standardization, testing, scripted curriculum, and school initiatives.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/15/professional-development-why-educators-and-teachers-cant-catch-up-that-quickly-and-how-to-change-it/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/28/learning-to-learn-for-my-professional-development-i-did-it-my-way/

 


Via Gust MEES
Dixie Binford's insight:

Sometimes, we are our own worst enemy.  Take a chance and suspend your disbelief.  Look at what you can do!

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Wynne Boliek's curator insight, November 23, 2015 1:41 PM

It is a myth that we operate under a set of oppressive bureaucratic constraints. In reality, teachers have a great deal of autonomy in the work they chose to do in their classrooms. In most cases it is our culture that provides the constraints. For individual teachers, trying out new practices and pedagogy is risky business and both our culture, and our reliance on hierarchy, provide the ideal barriers for change not to occur. As Pogo pointed out long ago, “we have met the enemy and it is us.” http://www.cea-ace.ca/blog/brian-harrison/2013/09/5/stop-asking-permission-change

Educational psychology has focused on the concepts of learned helplessness and more currently growth-fixed mindsets as a way to explain how and why students give up in the classroom setting.  These ideas can also be applied to educators in this day of forced standardization, testing, scripted curriculum, and school initiatives.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/15/professional-development-why-educators-and-teachers-cant-catch-up-that-quickly-and-how-to-change-it/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/03/28/learning-to-learn-for-my-professional-development-i-did-it-my-way/

 

 

Blanca Fondevila's curator insight, January 31, 10:11 AM

A serious problem that must be solve..

 

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, February 5, 4:12 AM

Teacher Agency:  Educators Moving from a Fixed to a Growth Mindset | @scoopit via @knolinfos http://sco.lt/...