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Rescooped by Kaylin Burleson from Geography Education
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High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places | Instruction | Scoop.it
Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 16, 2014 2:56 PM

This article, with its charts and interactive maps, is worth exploring to show some of the important spatial patterns of internal migration.  It's not hard to realize that larger, cosmopolitan metro areas will have an advantage in attracting and keeping prospective college graduates; the question that we should be asking our students is how will this impact neighborhoods, cities and regions?    


Tags: migration, USA, mappingcensus, education.

Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, June 19, 2014 8:47 AM

Good charts/grafts - worth looking at and using with the concept of migration.   

Rescooped by Kaylin Burleson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places | Instruction | Scoop.it
Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.

Via Seth Dixon
Kaylin Burleson's insight:

Good charts/grafts - worth looking at and using with the concept of migration.   

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 16, 2014 2:56 PM

This article, with its charts and interactive maps, is worth exploring to show some of the important spatial patterns of internal migration.  It's not hard to realize that larger, cosmopolitan metro areas will have an advantage in attracting and keeping prospective college graduates; the question that we should be asking our students is how will this impact neighborhoods, cities and regions?    


Tags: migration, USA, mappingcensus, education.

Rescooped by Kaylin Burleson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places | Instruction | Scoop.it
Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 16, 2014 2:56 PM

This article, with its charts and interactive maps, is worth exploring to show some of the important spatial patterns of internal migration.  It's not hard to realize that larger, cosmopolitan metro areas will have an advantage in attracting and keeping prospective college graduates; the question that we should be asking our students is how will this impact neighborhoods, cities and regions?    


Tags: migration, USA, mappingcensus, education.

Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, June 19, 2014 8:47 AM

Good charts/grafts - worth looking at and using with the concept of migration.   

Rescooped by Kaylin Burleson from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | Instruction | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:24 PM

The reason this article and maps are so important is because it shows that immigration isn't a new aspect of the American way of life. Historically people from across the globe flocked to America from Europe and Asia and today we're seeing increasing immigration from Central and South Americans as well as those fleeing unstable areas in the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 4, 6:56 PM

This article was very interesting to look at. I had knowledge that the majority of the immigrant population came from Mexico but it gave a different perspective to see it on a map. The one aspect that caught my attention was how the map of the United States looked like in 1910. The majority of the immigrants back then came from Europe, mainly Germany. Germany was the top country birth among U.S. immigrants because it was very dominating. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 5, 2:12 PM

Many people in 2015 feel that immigration-reform is an absolute must for America.  They usually use words like, "illegal", "terrorists", or "welfare-recipients" to try and scare the rest of the country into thinking immigration has spiraled out of control.  Immigration definitely has a different make-up from a hundred years ago, but that doesn't equate to it being a problem.

 

An article like this puts much into perspective.  What most naive and ignorant immigration-reformers might not now before reading this article is that the proportion of our current population has a fewer percentage of immigrants than back in 1910.  This fact is totally opposite from the picture that some critics try to draw, essentially, comparing immigration to millions of fire-ants invading our country.

 

Most immigrants now come from Latin America, whereas, in 1910 they came from Germany.  By reading the article, common sense will tell you that there might be more of a "racism" problem than an "immigration" problem in America.