Institutional Racism 323
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Can We Fix the Race Problem in America's School Discipline?

Can We Fix the Race Problem in America's School Discipline? (Can We Fix the Race Problem in America's School Discipline? http://t.co/XS906b1vOM)


Via Nancy J. Herr
Idalia Veguilla's insight:

How can race still be a problem in schools?  Again we are told by the media what a gangster looks like.  This idea gets into schools and teachers and adminstrators look for those features, and link them to something as simply as a t-shirt.  Schools target black fashion. So they implement strict dress codes with harsh discipline just like the article.  What if school prohibited suit and ties because you were most likely to be a scam artist.

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Quality education can help prevent racism and xenophobia – UN expert - UN News Centre

Quality education can help prevent racism and xenophobia – UN expert - UN News Centre | Institutional Racism 323 | Scoop.it
UN News Centre Quality education can help prevent racism and xenophobia – UN expert UN News Centre 14 June 2013 – Access to quality education has a significant role in preventing racism, xenophobia and other forms of discrimination, a United...

Via John Milton, Jocelyn Stoller
Idalia Veguilla's insight:

Equal educatin can do more than provide the same opportunity for everyone.  Do minorites have less access to education?  Yes studies have proved this.

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Lorena Massimino's comment, June 21, 2013 8:39 AM
This is extremely important today especially due to globalisation. For example racism against the Muslim population due to the War on Terror is a problem. Also, the key to development of a state and the world in general is through education. Education is a important part in social development and social development is a vital factor for a successful stable state. However providing "quality and higher education" to indigenous peoples can come across as cultural imperialism since it would most likely be a western education and point of view.
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Report: High-Achieving Minorities Drop Off in High School

Report: High-Achieving Minorities Drop Off in High School | Institutional Racism 323 | Scoop.it
A new report from The Education Trust notes that high-achieving minorities and economically disadvantaged students suffer upon reaching high school.

Via Mel Riddile
Idalia Veguilla's insight:

Helping your family can be more important than getting an A.  Minorites are more likely to be lower income than whites.  This article discussed the differences in grades among white and black students particularly at the high school level. Sometimes working for your family to make ends meet and doing homework can be alot for a teenager.  This could be one reason for the grade disparities as mentioned in the article.  How can we fix this issue? 

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Jessica Koporetz's curator insight, May 13, 2014 4:22 PM

After a recent study it is proven that “minority and economically disadvantaged students who have excelled at the elementary and junior high levels are twice as likely not to take college admission tests, and have lower grade point averages in high school.” (Green) Many reasons have been to blame for this development. One is the expectations and views that are had by the teachers. Another reason is the economical disadvantages many minorities have such as single parent households. By having single parent households, children lose the support and encouragement that many teens from two parent households thrive on.  This article proves that students that come from low income housing or single family homes have a higher fail rate. Something needs to be done to stop this cycle and promote this group of students to go to school and better themselves and their families.

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State settles age, race discrimination suit

State settles age, race discrimination suit | Institutional Racism 323 | Scoop.it
A 71-year-old Big Island man who sued the Department of Education for race and age discrimination will get $30,000 under a settlement with the state.

Via Chris Hadrill
Idalia Veguilla's insight:

Affirmative Action hurts white right?  This is a common misconception this may have been more of an age discrimination which is wrong, but I don't think it's racial.  Studies have shown the only group that has benefited from affirmative action are white females.

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Education, Institutional Racism, and the Conservative Response to "My Brother ... - Huffington Post

Education, Institutional Racism, and the Conservative Response to "My Brother ... - Huffington Post | Institutional Racism 323 | Scoop.it
Education, Institutional Racism, and the Conservative Response to "My Brother ...
Idalia Veguilla's insight:

Where does they idea that minorites just aren't trying?  This assumption occurs because of media and whites have declared themselves superior.  This isn't necessarily true.  Other areas in educational racism need to be addressed to find the root of the problem.  Not what we are told to believe by the media.

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The federal government’s short attention span

The federal government’s short attention span | Institutional Racism 323 | Scoop.it
Education policies exacerbate neighborhood inequality.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Idalia Veguilla's insight:

How does neighborhood inequality affect education? Predominantly white neighborhoods tend to have nicer schools and more resources.  This means more opportunity to succeed in schools.

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Why Are American Schools Still Segregated?

Why Are American Schools Still Segregated? | Institutional Racism 323 | Scoop.it
A new study offers two answers: White people are making up a smaller percentage of the population than they used to, and different races are living in different school districts.
    

Via Thomas Faltin
Idalia Veguilla's insight:

Residental racism is a problem here.  Have you every noticed schools that are located in more white neighborhoods have nicer schools and better opportunities?  This is an example of residential racism and stopping segregation in schools.

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Jessica Koporetz's curator insight, May 14, 2014 12:16 PM

Since Brown V Board of Education it was ordered that school districts needed to desegregate. However, today it seems tmany school and school districts arre going back to their old ways. Many schools have students with high poverty levels are limited to positive educational opportunites and outcomes. Many of the students in inner city schools do not have the means to go outside of their district (ie: low income, high prices in homes, etc) crippling them within their school systems. Due to these factors it continues to radically isolate and keep races imbalance between districts. This article makes readers step back and analyze segregation in their own city.

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Divergent and Convergent Thinking - Innovation Excellence (blog)

Divergent and Convergent Thinking - Innovation Excellence (blog) | Institutional Racism 323 | Scoop.it

Divergent and Convergent Thinking-Innovation Excellence (blog)

The two styles of thinking are very powerful when used sequentially but much less so when they are mixed. An effective brainstorm or ideation meeting consists of two phases.


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
Idalia Veguilla's insight:

Why do some think an education doesn't pay off?  What if we changed school curriculms.  This article reminds me of the video shown in class.  Education does need to be reformed.  Creativity thinking is what is missing from schools.

 

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Study: Education Extends Longevity, Except for Black Males

Study: Education Extends Longevity, Except for Black Males | Institutional Racism 323 | Scoop.it
New research on the connection between education and longevity shows substantial disparities by race and gender.
Idalia Veguilla's insight:

Life span and education are related.  The more education someone has the more likely they are to live longer.  This makes sense considering uneducated people make unhealthy food choices.

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Connor McDade's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:50 PM

This article opens by demonstrating societal advances over the past decades, in order to demonstrate which demographics have been most limited from advancement. In the past century, life expectancies have skyrocketed due to advanced science, medicine, and nutritional knowledge. However, this life expectancy boost has been driven almost entirely by the most educated members of society. "About 40 percent of the least-educated African American males who make it to age 25 will die before they are 65, the study found, as will 22 percent of the most-educated. For all other groups, the chances of dying by age 65 are only 10 percent." The study brings attention to glaring gaps, not just in academic achievement, but also in sheer longevity and health; a relationship that cannot be ignored.

Jessica Koporetz's curator insight, May 13, 2014 4:46 PM

Researchers point to education for a longer and healthier life. Young black men that are in school are safer than they are in the streets.  They are not exposed to gang life, drugs, alcohol, etc. Instead they are focused on gaining knowledge and establishing a career.  But, the confusing statistic is the following “About 40 percent of the least-educated African American males who make it to age 25 will die before they are 65, the study found, as will 22 percent of the most-educated.  For all other groups, the chances of dying by age 65 are only 10 percent.”(Peters-Smith) Why is this number so high if they are removed from the toxic environment?  Is it because the black man is always having to prove that they are intelligent, hardworking, worthy of having a job or money for that matter?

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At 76, Jonathan Kozol Is More Outraged Over Inequality in Education Than Ever - Education - GOOD

At 76, Jonathan Kozol Is More Outraged Over Inequality in Education Than Ever - Education - GOOD | Institutional Racism 323 | Scoop.it
Education activist Jonathan Kozol is letting loose on child poverty, racism, and educational inequity these days.

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Idalia Veguilla's insight:

Poverty and racism are closely linked.  So why not provide education that is equal to everyone.  Giving everyone the same opportunity regardless of race and class is equal opportunity

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