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The Power of Pure Emotion Drives People to Action

The Power of Pure Emotion Drives People to Action | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it

This article is by Mars Dorian for businessgrow this piece is based on John Kearon's talk at a conference about the power of emotion and why you need to make people feel something to get them to do something.

 

Jan Gordon: My commentary

 

Know your audience and speak to their listening

 

This was mentioned in this article by the author who paraphrased

what John Kearon said:

 

”We are feeling creatures. Content matters so much LESS than you think it does. Do something shocking or exhilarating in your marketing, but don’t be bland. If people feel nothing, they do nothing

 

Do the best companies make you think or feel? The author suggests feeling is what makes things happen".

 

Jan Gordon: 


Content in any form is an important part of marketing. It's the door opener, the bridge that can lead to comments, relationships, brand advocacy, transactions and other opportunities that might not have otherwise happened. Using emotion that strikes a chord with your audience is very important.


This was a response from Mars Dorian to one of the comments and I absolutely agree with him: (again, know your audience, this might not apply to everyone).


"haha, I think the limits of pushing that emotional zone haven't been pushed yet - because companies as well as solopreneurs tend to hold back on the edgy, but effective stuff".


 

Here are some highlights that I think apply to content curators/arketers particularly: 

 

"PURE emotion is the sole buying decision influencer — because it’s targeting your oldest and most powerful part of the brain – the fight-or-flight REPTILIAN BRAIN".

 

Here are a few suggestions that caught my attention particularly for content marketers/curators:

 

Concentrate on the feeling benefit of your products and services

 

**show pictures, words and/or videos of how people feel after they bought your product or services - What state do you want them to feel?


Write Visual:


**The easier it is to grab your sentences, the more your audience can picture it. If they can "picture" it, they can feel it.


 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"


See full article here: [http://bit.ly/SIKXEw]


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janlgordon's comment, August 20, 2012 1:44 PM
Thanks John for sharing this!
John van den Brink's comment, August 20, 2012 1:48 PM
You're welcome Jan. Is another great post! Have a great day.
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100 Change and Transformation Tips - Change Factory

100 Change and Transformation Tips - Change Factory | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
From experience, from stories, from theory. Here are 100 change and transformation tips from Change Factory.

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Future of Change Management

Future of Change Management | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
The discipline of change management has morphed and evolved significantly over the past two decades. With foundations the human experience and psychology, change management exploded onto the business scene in the mid-1990s and has become a more formalized and structured effort over the last decade.

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Radical Change: Engaging Communities

Radical Change: Engaging Communities | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
It doesn't have to be 'them and us'. With the right type of engagement, it can be 'us' all around. I'm seeing increased interest in the power of socially moderated and driven change models:

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, July 15, 6:00 AM

Great scoop here via @CelineSchill.  


I really agree with this statement:


Momentum is one of the hardest aspects of change: you can easily create disturbance, but like ripples on the water, it soon fades away. True change requires momentum over time, and that can only be generated from within the community, not input from outside.


It's socially created and socially moderated, so almost by definition, it requires engagement from the community.

Miguel Herrera E.'s curator insight, July 17, 3:02 AM

Un modelo para el cambio

 

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5 Steps For Leading Through Adaptive Change

5 Steps For Leading Through Adaptive Change | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it

Leadership and management are two distinctly different but complimentary skill sets that all companies need. Leaders make sure the organization is doing the right things, while managers make sure they do those things right. Leadership is about coping with change while management is about coping with complex issues. Both are qualities that can be learned and both require constant focus on improvement. Especially when the organization is facing potential adaptive challenges.


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Josie Gibson's curator insight, August 12, 6:20 PM

Thanks to @LeadershipABC for highlighting this article.

Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, August 12, 11:25 PM

These five steps may seem very simple but they are often taken for granted. To give direction a leader must take ownership and have a vision. Managing conflict and providing protection are often not pleasant and require great maturity from leaders. Shaping the norms and clarifying roles is often not given a very high priority as it involves intangible people skills.

 

Read more scoops on change and leadership here: http://www.scoop.it/t/on-leaders-and-managers/?tag=Change

http://www.scoop.it/t/on-leaders-and-managers/?tag=Leadership

Jay Roth's curator insight, August 17, 4:33 PM

Perfect article to suggest (in schools) WHY the trainings of Cognitive Coaching, Adaptive Schools, and Polarity Thinking is necessary!

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The Automatic Earth - Real Futurists

The Automatic Earth - Real Futurists | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it

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10 Clear Principles for the 96% that Need Culture Change

10 Clear Principles for the 96% that Need Culture Change | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
I wrote a popular TLNT.com article about how 96% of respondents from a Strategy& / Katzenbach Center survey on culture and change management highlighted that culture change was needed in their organization in some form.  I criticized some of the over-simplified recommendations that accompanied the survey release but The Katzenbach Center came through with their […]

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Resistance to Change is Not Futile

Resistance to Change is Not Futile | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it

Resistance that stems from employees uncovering a problem with the change initiative could be a source of information that can be used to improve the change or its implementation.


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Ian Berry's curator insight, August 14, 3:39 AM

A nice model for overcoming and dealing with resistance to change

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How to Design for Long-Term Behavior Change—Part 1: New Habit Formation

How to Design for Long-Term Behavior Change—Part 1: New Habit Formation | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
Congats to Germany for winning the FIFA World Cup. Now, the game is over, it's time to get back to some serious gamification and talk about designing for sustained behavior changes.   Last time I told you about my biggest takeaway from GSummit 2014 after I gave a quick recap of the conference. I ref...

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Changing How You Lead Change - Australian Institute of Management Blog

Changing How You Lead Change - Australian Institute of Management Blog | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
Guest post by Jodie Nevid

Leading change is one of the most common problems leaders face.
There is a common misconception that people fear change, however it is rarely “change” itself that people fear. Fears are often related to people’s identify, comfort zones and beliefs. Learning to work with those three things can change everything.
Dilts’ Neurological Levels Pyramid is a great tool for leaders to explore because it can be a fantastic guide to leading change.
Let’s look at the 7 levels from bottom up:
Level 1 – Environment
When people are unhappy, the environment is often our first port of call. It could be the job, the organisation, the team, or even the location of a desk. There is an assumption that a change in environment will create an increase in happiness. Not so, because we take our unhappy selves with us! New workstations rarely solve the real issues.
Level 2 – Behaviour

When environmental change fails to lift morale, the logical place to improve seems to be behaviour. I see this done through team charters, agreed behaviours or a code of conduct. This can work, however it rarely sticks because people slip back to old ways. Frustration increases and we knock on the door of level three.
Level 3 – Skills
Frustration with a team’s failed attempt to live the charter often has leaders pulling out their hair, asking what it takes to get commitment. “Argh…It must be a skills gap!” An investment in training goes ahead, and if done well, improvements from some but not all take place. However, it is often only on the surface, because as we know, new skills don’t always stick!
Level 4 – Beliefs
All the skills in the world are no match for deep seeded limiting beliefs. Thoughts like ‘I could never do or say that’, or ‘that would never work here’ always come back to bite. This is where hope takes a hit and confusion sets in because when leaders have put their team through these steps all they can ask is, “Why doesn’t anything stick?”
It’s simple; if people don’t truly believe change is possible, their subconscious mind will continue to sabotage their own progress. Warning: trying to change someone’s beliefs can be incredibly difficult. Their beliefs are their truths. Don’t try to dissolve them – understand how they got there, because there’s usually a very logical reason!
Level 5 – Values
When you can find congruence between one’s values and the desired change, everything is easier. One of the best questions you can learn to ask your staff is “What really matters to you?” People become annoyed when they don’t feel understood or respected.
When you explore people’s values you can also look at their character strengths. The things people do well are most likely related to the things they hold valuable; it probably has some value in relation to the change as well.
Level 6 – Identity
When someone is in a resistant state I will focus the conversation back on them. “What do you believe to be true about yourself?” Is a great question and the answer can be challenging and enlightening as it shifts thought patterns.
A leader’s time is best spent coaching people to look within. Don’t make the mistake of waiting until after the fire when everyone is burnt. Teach people to find courage in ownership of their identity and give them the tools to change it for the better if they want to. Change can come quickly when people change the way they see themselves.
Level 7 – Purpose
In his book Drive, Daniel Pink identifies the three main motivators for people as: autonomy, mastery and purpose. The peak of Dilt’s pyramid is about that which is greater than self.
When people feel connected to a sense of purpose they will move heaven and earth. In fact, it is a connection to purpose that often gets in the way of change. When I ask people why they are resisting change, they often tell me they perceive the change as a threat to their purpose.
Experience has taught me that change is easier and faster when you start with conversations at the top of the pyramid. It has also taught me that most teams and organisations get bogged down at levels 1, 2 and 3. As you lead your people through the next change, why not take the short cut? It just might change the way you lead people through change!

Jodie Nevid is an international speaker, coach, consultant, facilitator and business owner who has worked with thousands of leaders across Australia and New Zealand. Jodie regularly speaks at conferences focused on self-development, personal growth, leadership and high performance. You can read more great articles by Jodie on her blog at The 7 Effect.
You may also be interested in joining AIM in Adelaide for the Women in Management High Tea on Thursday 14 August, where Jodie will be discussing the road less travelled.








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Renee Gibbins's curator insight, July 14, 7:26 AM

I currently work for a Queensland Government Department who are undergoing massive change. I have recently put together a presentation on how to work better as an effective team. After reading this article I have realised I'm stuck at level 2. I eventually want to end up managing a corporate unit where I have control of all elements of our business including Health and Safety, Human Resources and Finance.

 

To be able to take control of such a unit I need to move past level two and I believe these steps and levels detailed here are a great snapshot to begin that journey.

 

I have clear knowledge of what our units purpose is but need to find a way to link that back to each staff member to assist us through a huge culture shift and drive the change in our workforce from within.

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Change Your Stories, Change Your Organization

Change Your Stories, Change Your Organization | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
Organizational narratives are the manifestation of the shared beliefs an organization holds about itself as a collective. “Our organization stands for innovation,” is a common example; “This will n...

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Lisa McCarthy's curator insight, July 10, 8:31 PM

The organizational stories of “self” shape the organizational climate as much as they influence directives, decision-making processes and overall strategies. Organizational narratives are different from employer or employee branding. While branding is a deliberate effort, narratives are born in the moment and reflect the collective fears, hopes and aspirations. As these narratives are based on what large groups perceive as reality, they go viral seemingly effortlessly: from the CEO to the entire staff and back, across suppliers and customers to the outside world.

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10 Tips For Handling Change in the Workplace

10 Tips For Handling Change in the Workplace | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
One of the attributes all employees need to have is being able to adapt to change. In this current economy, everyone is moving around from one company or group to the next. We've accepted that employees don't stay in one …Read »

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Patricia D. Sadar - Career and Leadership Acceleration Coach's curator insight, July 8, 2:33 PM

The only thing that anyone can be sure of is change.  The advice in this article is not something that you haven't heard before; however, focusing on what you can control and staying in touch with past colleagues is advice that serves all of us.

 

Keeping up with the trends and continuously building your skills and knowledge is advice that was given to me when I first started out in my career.

 

Ask yourself:  If you are out of work today, have you kept up with the knowledge, skills, and certifications to compete in the marketplace?  If not, set time aside each week to do this.  Even if you don't have the funds or time -- you can always enroll in an online free course offered through edx.

 

Until next time...PS - Live on Purpose!

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A Spiral Model of Change | Unfolding Leadership

A Spiral Model of Change | Unfolding Leadership | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
Designing change can be following the whorl of a shell more than the steps of a pyramid. In practical terms this simply means that a few people begin designing an approximation of the organizational changes desired, with more people joining the design process in waves as the spiral expands.

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David Hain's curator insight, July 9, 3:54 AM

Real change involves emergent practices, rarely if ever happens form top down pressure.  Great post by @DanOestreich (as usual!)

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To Create Change, Leadership Is More Important Than Authority

To Create Change, Leadership Is More Important Than Authority | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it

And you can't rely on the facts to make your case, either.


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From the Sponsor's Desk - The Four Pillars of Successful Change Management

From the Sponsor's Desk - The Four Pillars of Successful Change Management | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
In my last post, Best Practices Accelerate Value Delivery, we saw how the CIO of a relatively new government agency used a comprehensive best practise...

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Claude Emond's curator insight, August 20, 11:48 PM

Tells a good story of a disastrous change management approach and explains why it failed. Alas, this story is a universal one and I still do not understand why most people «managing» changes still insist on doing the same mistakes over and over again. You just cannot decide for anybody when, how and how much they will change; they will just fight you back !...as you will do yourself if someone tries this «change recipe» on you, right ?

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Constant change is the new normal

Constant change is the new normal | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it

Business is becoming ever more complex and according to several major studies less than half the global CEO population feel their organisations are able and prepared to handle the level of complexity they are facing – let alone the level they expect to face in the future.

Many industries have had some tough years with recession, increased competition, changing consumer behavior, rapidly shifting technologies and emerging disruptive business models.

What does it take to respond to these challenges?

 


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David Hain's curator insight, August 18, 4:11 AM

Constant change is the new normal. Change is now a constant opportunity to evolve the business. Strategy in a world of constant change, by Torben Rick.

donhornsby's curator insight, August 18, 7:14 AM

(From the article): Many of the new changes and occurrences are both new and difficult to forecast which was not the case in the past, so businesses have to become more agile and robust to be able to succeed in the new environment. This too will become normal.

Ian Berry's curator insight, August 20, 9:10 PM

Constantly changing what's normal when same no longer serves is the new standard and changing what's normal before it becomes imperative is the key

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7 Organizational Change Management Best Practices

7 Organizational Change Management Best Practices | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it

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How to Set and Achieve any Goal you Have in Your Life - with John Assaraf Part 1 - YouTube

How to Set and Achieve any Goal you Have in Your Life - with John Assaraf Part 1 - YouTube | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
http://bit.ly/FREEBrainAThonEvent How to Set and Achieve any Goal you Have in Your Life - with John Assaraf Part 1 In this video John Assaraf explains how to...
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The People Side of Change Management

The People Side of Change Management | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
An important part of change management is knowing when and how to engage employees in the change process.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 3, 6:57 AM

We often forget about the people involved in change. Even term change management is one that forgets people. We lead people and manage things. Yet, we want to manage the people side of change. Let's change the language and leadership actions.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, August 5, 10:35 AM

 "An important part of change management is knowing when and how to engage employees in the change process." ~ Approach, leadership, and collaboration matter.

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10 Principles of Leading Change Management

10 Principles of Leading Change Management | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
These time-honored tools and techniques can help companies transform quickly.

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The Cultural Tipping Point: The 4 Reasons Change Initiatives Fail

The Cultural Tipping Point: The 4 Reasons Change Initiatives Fail | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
My fascination with culture began more than 40 years ago when another young industrial engineer named Jim Delaney and I started a process improvement consulting firm not long after …

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Why organisational change can be difficult

Why organisational change can be difficult | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it

Organisational change from a Darwinian perspective (Why organisational change can be difficult http://t.co/zlIJpDEWXF via @lyndashm)


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Change Management is dead: Long Live Change Leadership

Change Management is dead: Long Live Change Leadership | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it

I remember back in the 1990's when I became a project manager. I especially remember my first project management course, in 1991, where the instructor dramatically announced that more than 50% of projects fail.

And today, in 2014, not much has changed. CIO magazine reports that the failure rate remains about the same.


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David Hain's curator insight, July 10, 4:42 AM

"When employees have to change, change fails. Plain and simple. The key lies in making employees want to change." Passionate plea form Jesper Lowgren.

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Change Management And The Power Of Language

Change Management And The Power Of Language | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it
Language has a huge role to play in the bedding in of new ways of doing things. Language actually defines a culture because it is literally how people connect – changing it significantly shifts the parameters of, and the context for, what is defined, accepted and encouraged. Here are five interconnected ways you can change your language to better complement the actions you intend taking.

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Lisa McCarthy's curator insight, July 10, 8:29 PM

Just as every culture was generated and sustained by what people chose to highlight and reinforce, shifts will come when people get the chance to reset the boundaries through conversation. Words are much more than the means to that end. They are the most powerful and vibrant signals because they actually define how actions continue to be talked about. Without that, you have a dumb organization – one muted into doing, guessing and, inevitably, politicking.

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Emotional and rational case for organizational change

Emotional and rational case for organizational change | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it

Employees’ emotions are where the momentum for real transformation lies

Many leaders excel at building the rational case for change, but they are less adept in appealing to people’s emotional core. Yet the employees’ emotions are where the momentum for real transformation ultimately lies.

Change management communications need to be targeted to each segment of the workforce, and delivered in a two-way fashion that allows people to make sense of the change subjectively.

Change is really a people process, and people being creatures of habit are typically resistantto adopting new mind-sets, practices, and behaviors.


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David Hain's curator insight, July 9, 3:51 AM

People change with their hearts - business cases only win minds!

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10 Truths About Change Management | Leadership

10 Truths About Change Management | Leadership | Inspire to Change | Scoop.it

As an Organizational Development (OD) and Change Management practitioner, I often find myself having conversations with leaders regarding change management – what it is and what it isn’t. Last … (Many people underestimate how challenging #change...


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