Insects, Pest & Beneficial
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Insects, Pest & Beneficial
Beneficial & pest insects; ecology; behavior; control; genetics; evolution, more
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Ready Or Not, Here Come The Cicadas!

Ready Or Not, Here Come The Cicadas! | Insects, Pest & Beneficial | Scoop.it
North Carolinians in the western Triangle and Triad soon will be visited en masse by the ear-splitting song of the 17-year cicadas. Over the next ten days
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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, April 18, 2013 4:12 PM

CALS Entomologist, Dr. Clyde Sorenson, tells WUNC radio about the life cycle and emergence of Brood II of red-eyed 17-year magicicadas, who will shortly emerge from the soil for a mating frenzy. They sound, he says, eerie, like a weird cross between a fire engine and a space ship. There's a sound clip in the story, too! | Read more | http://tinyurl.com/clp2ve6

 

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Ant Species Losing Ground to Venomous Kind

Ant Species Losing Ground to Venomous Kind | Insects, Pest & Beneficial | Scoop.it
An aggressive species is being displaced in North America by a more aggressive — and potentially dangerous — species, according to a new study.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

War of the ants intensifies in U.S. (NY Times): Former Entomology PhD student Eleanor Spicer Rice finds invasive, bellicose ants outdoing each other in aggression.

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Tradition meets innovation in CALS scientist’s tomato breeding efforts | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agricultu...

Tradition meets innovation in CALS scientist’s tomato breeding efforts | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agricultu... | Insects, Pest & Beneficial | Scoop.it

News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at NC State University

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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 8, 2013 2:29 PM

Combining new tools, such as marker-assisted selection (MAS) with time-honored methods, Dr. Dilip Panthee carries on NCSU’s strong tradition in plant breeding, developing hardier, higher-yielding plants for NC's $30B/year tomato industry.

 

NCSU's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) has the nation’s largest university plant breeding program; and Pantheeproudly follows in the footsteps of Dr. Randy Gardner, a retired breeder credited with developing the cultivars used on some 60-75% of the vine-ripe tomatoes grown in the Eastern US.

 

Working at the Mt. Horticultural Crops Research & Extension Center in Mills River, Panthee focuses on developing tomato breeding lines and cultivars with three traits: disease resistance, fruit quality and stress tolerance. That’s because, in a survey he conducted, these three traits were the ones NC  growers reported needing the most.

 

Read more about our tomato breeding program:

http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/agcomm/news-center/?p=21430

 

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/fletcher/programs/tomato/

 

http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/achievement/tomato_breeding.htm

 

Some of our releases:

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/fletcher/programs/tomato/publications.html

 

 

 

 

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Researchers Regroup Post Sandy

Researchers Regroup Post Sandy | Insects, Pest & Beneficial | Scoop.it
Researchers return to New York City next month to continue their study of insect populations in urban areas in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"When Hurricane Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic in October, the superstorm not only damaged hundreds of thousands of homes, displaced thousands of residents and shut down Wall Street, it swept right through the middle of an NC State research project collecting data on insects in New York City. Researchers will return to the storm-ravaged region next month to continue their work.

 

"The project got off to a smooth start last summer when ecologists Amy Savage and Elsa Youngsteadt, researchers in the Departments of Entomology and Biology, deposited sticky card traps, data loggers and other measuring devices in trees throughout New York City parks. This was part of Youngsteadt’s research on how urban warming impacts arthropods (such as scale insects, leaf hoppers and caterpillars.) Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Note: Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, a fascinating, rich group of studies, including Citizen Science, from the lab of Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NCSU.

You can see their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 6, 2013 3:56 PM

"When Hurricane Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic in October, the superstorm not only damaged hundreds of thousands of homes, displaced thousands of residents and shut down Wall Street, it swept right through the middle of an NC State research project collecting data on insects in New York City. Researchers will return to the storm-ravaged region next month to continue their work.

 

"The project got off to a smooth start last summer when ecologists Amy Savage and Elsa Youngsteadt, researchers in the Departments of Entomology and Biology, deposited sticky card traps, data loggers and other measuring devices in trees throughout New York City parks. This was part of Youngsteadt’s research on how urban warming impacts arthropods (such as scale insects, leaf hoppers and caterpillars.) Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Note: Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, a fascinating, rich group of studies, including Citizen Science, from the lab of Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NCSU.

You can see their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

 

 

 

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Two New Hessian Fly Management Tools Now Available

Two New Hessian Fly Management Tools Now Available | Insects, Pest & Beneficial | Scoop.it

I am very excited about the publication of “Biology and Management of Hessian Fly in the Southeast”, as well as a new video produced by the North Carolina Small Grain Growers Associatio...

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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, January 29, 2013 3:16 PM

The video draws on the research of wheat breeder, Dr. Paul Murphy, small grains specialist, Dr. Randy Weisz and entomologist, Dr. Dominic Reisig to demonstrate how to control this insect pest of wheat in the southeast. The video is produced through a collaboration of the NC Small Grain Growers Association and the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University.

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Monsanto Corn Rootworm Knowledge Research Announces Grant - Growing North Carolina

Monsanto Corn Rootworm Knowledge Research Announces Grant - Growing North Carolina | Insects, Pest & Beneficial | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Entomologist, Dr. Marcé Lorenzen, of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NC State University, is one of six scientists awarded grants for corn rootworm knowledge research. Dr. Lorenzen will use the grant to develop methods to produce transgenic western corn rootworm and create strains that will enable researchers around the world to perform genome-wide mutagenesis in western corn rootworm by simply crossing two strains.

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NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Researchers Find Asian Needle Ants Displacing Other Aggressive Invaders

NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Researchers Find Asian Needle Ants Displacing Other Aggressive Invaders | Insects, Pest & Beneficial | Scoop.it

Photo of Asian needle ant stinging a termite courtesy of Benoit Guenard.

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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 11, 2013 3:53 PM

CALS researchers find that one of the most aggressive invasive ant species in the US, the Argentine ant, appears to have met its match in the Asian needle ant. Former NC State PhD student Dr. Eleanor Spicer Rice & Dr. Jules Silverman, Entomology, published their findings in PLoS One:

 

http://scienceblog.com/59643/asian-needle-ants-displacing-other-aggressive-invaders/ ;

 

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0056281

 

 

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Researchers Regroup Post Sandy

Researchers Regroup Post Sandy | Insects, Pest & Beneficial | Scoop.it
Researchers return to New York City next month to continue their study of insect populations in urban areas in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.
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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 6, 2013 4:20 PM

"When Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic, also swept through an NCSU research project collecting data on NYC insects. Researchers return to the storm-ravaged region shortly. Ecologists Amy Savage & Elsa Youngsteadt placed sticky card traps, data loggers & other measuring devices in NYC park trees. Youngsteadt was studying how urban warming affects arthropods (scale insects, leaf hoppers, caterpillars). Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, from the lab of Dr. Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NCSU. You'll find their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

 

Read the story at:

http://bulletin.ncsu.edu/2013/02/insects/

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ScienceShot: How an Aphid Is Like a Cat - ScienceNOW

ScienceShot: How an Aphid Is Like a Cat - ScienceNOW | Insects, Pest & Beneficial | Scoop.it
ScienceShot: How an Aphid Is Like a Cat - ScienceNOW
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