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Rescooped by Raymond WM Fung from Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
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Unlocking Nigeria’s Agriculture Value Chain through Innovation - Nigeria Today

Unlocking Nigeria’s Agriculture Value Chain through Innovation - Nigeria Today | Insect protein | Scoop.it
Innovation underscored the Stanbic IBTC Business Leadership Series, which had the theme, ‘Gems in the Field.’ It was no surprise that the event had as headliner Jason Drew, South African farmer who grabbed global attention by creating a multi-million dollar business by rearing flies. Drew teamed up with Ogbeh and Kola Masha, Managing Director, Doreo Partners, an agriculture-focused investment firm, to provide critical insight on transforming Nigeria via agriculture.
Drew showcased at the event, a forum designed to inspire the next generation of Nigerian business leaders and entrepreneurs through knowledge sharing capable of optimising growth of the Nigerian economy, the significance of innovation, doggedness and creativity to business success.
Having identified a huge and growing need – meat and protein – Drew set up an eco-venture through which he harvested soldier flies which are reared to produce millions of tons of maggots which are processed, pressed and dried into nutrient-rich fertilizer and shipped to chicken farms and aquaculture plants as food. This translates to more meat and protein for human consumption.
Drew’s quest is driven by a simple calculation. The global population is projected to hit nine billion by 2050, an addition of two billion people from the current figure. Feeding the additional mouths will trigger a rapid demand for protein in the form of beef, pork, fish and chicken, which will be further buoyed by growing global prosperity and rising income levels in Asia and Africa. According to the World Health Organisation, global production of meat will have to increase to 376 million tonnes by 2030 if hopes of meeting the demand for protein from the developing world are to be met.

Via Ana C. Day
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Pepsi CEO Says: ‘Bugs Are the Food of the Future’

Pepsi CEO Says: ‘Bugs Are the Food of the Future’ | Insect protein | Scoop.it
“Bug-related stuff is big,” Nooyi told investors at the Net/Net event at the New York Stock Exchange. "[Experts] said the hottest thing is eating crickets. I am not talking about the game cricket, I am talking about crickets! In chips. And I am a vegetarian, I am not eating any cricket chips. But they said if you want a high protein source, there is a series of products being launched with crickets."

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Nutrient Absorption of Edible Insects Measures up to Beef

Nutrient Absorption of Edible Insects Measures up to Beef | Insect protein | Scoop.it
How about swapping beef with bugs? As more sustainable alternatives to eating meat and fish continue to trend, research into the nutrient levels of edible insects like grasshoppers and crickets reveals eating bugs could provide as much iron and other nutrients as consuming beef. 

A new study examines how the nutrients, particularly iron, provided by such insects really measures up to beef - and finds that bugs actually do fill that dietary need.

Dr Yemisi Latunde-Dada (pictured below), lecturer at the Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine at King’s College, London, tells FoodIngredientsFirst how grasshoppers, crickets, mealworms and buffalo worms were analyzed for their mineral contents. The team estimated how much each nutrient would likely get absorbed if eaten, by using a lab model of human digestion.

“Mineral levels and solubility (an index of availability) were determined in the insects. Cell culture model was used to measure absorption,” Dr Latunde-Dada says.

The insects had varying levels of iron, calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese and zinc. Crickets, for example, had higher levels of iron than the other insects did. Minerals including calcium, copper and zinc from grasshoppers, crickets and mealworms are more readily available for absorption than the same minerals from beef.

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How to knock out herpesvirus RNA transport — with applications from cold sores to cancer

How to knock out herpesvirus RNA transport — with applications from cold sores to cancer | Insect protein | Scoop.it
A new approach has been developed to combat diseases caused by herpesvirus infections, including everything from cold sores to cancer.

 

Researchers at the University of Leeds have discovered a way to prevent herpesviruses hijacking important pathways in cells which are required for the virus to replicate and cause disease.

Professor Adrian Whitehouse from the School of Molecular Biology and Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology at the University led the five year study, the results of which are published today in the journal Nature Microbiology.

 

Prof Whitehouse said: "We've spent several years demonstrating that a protein found in all herpesviruses, recruits a protein complex in the host cell, called human TREX, to help stabilise and transport herpesvirus RNAs out of a cell's nucleus so they are turned into viral proteins. "Now we have identified a compound which can disrupt this essential virus-host cell interaction which in turn prevents herpesviruses replicating and producing infectious particles."

 

The approach the researchers used was unique as it targeted the enzyme activity of a key component of the cellular human TREX complex, known as UAP56.  Inhibiting t his activity prevented the remodelling of the human TREX complex which stopped the interaction with the viral protein.

 

The project is a collaboration between virologists led by Professor Whitehouse and a team of chemists led by Dr Richard Foster also from the University of Leeds. Dr Foster's team performed a virtual screen of thousands of compounds to identify potential inhibitors. These were then tested for their ability to stop herpesvirus replication without damaging the host cell.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Emily's comment, November 21, 12:57 AM
Look great
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First for Australia: BAP-Certified Rainbow Trout Farms | Aquaculture Directory

First for Australia: BAP-Certified Rainbow Trout Farms | Aquaculture Directory | Insect protein | Scoop.it
Congratulations to Goulburn River Trout, the first rainbow trout business in Australia and the Eastern Hemisphere to attain Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) certification. Both of the company’s farms, Thornton Farm and Walnut Island Farm, which are located in the foothills of the Great Dividing Range in northeast Victoria, earned BAP certification on October 25.

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Coop soon to sell mealworms and crickets

Coop soon to sell mealworms and crickets | Insect protein | Scoop.it

Expected in spring 2017, the new food regulation enters into force. Sales of three species of insects as food is in Switzerland then allowed: mealworms, grasshoppers and crickets.


Via Ana C. Day
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Ana C. Day's curator insight, November 4, 4:41 AM

"The retailer Coop wants to take a leading role in this new trend. Roland Frefel, head fresh products at Coop, said in an interview of 20 minutes that his company will have the date of legalization of insect products on the shelves. Possible make this a collaboration with the start-up Essento from Switzerland. What are the plans of Coop from? How to cook insects? See this and more in the video."

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Crickets, mealworms on the menu at San Antonio dinner tonight

Crickets, mealworms on the menu at San Antonio dinner tonight | Insect protein | Scoop.it
Would you ever eat a cricket? How about a cricket sauteéd in butter, tossed with cinnamon and sugar and placed atop a flan cake?
To show that adding insects to everyday foods is not just possible but delicious, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service is hosting Insecta Fiesta, a dinner tonight at Blue Star Brewing Co.
There’s also a chips-and-dip bar with roasted mealworm salsa, guacamole with lightly toasted waxworms and queso made with fire ants.

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Antioxidant activity of predigested protein obtained from a range of farmed edible insects

Antioxidant activity of predigested protein obtained from a range of farmed edible insects | Insect protein | Scoop.it
This study investigated the antioxidant activities of peptides obtained by in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of edible insects. The antioxidant potential of edible insects' hydrolysates was determined as the free radical-scavenging activity, ion chelating activity and reducing power.

Via Jacques Mignon
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Jacques Mignon's curator insight, November 4, 12:29 PM
Part abstract: "The highest antiradical activity against DPPH˙, whose IC50 value is the lowest, was noted for Amphiacusta annulipes (19.1 μg/mL) and that against ABTS˙+ was the highest for Zophobas morio (4.6 μg/mL). The peptides obtained from A. annulipes also showed the highest Fe2+ chelation ability (58.82%) and reducing power (0.652). The highest ability to chelate Cu2+ was noted for Locusta migratoria (86.05%). The locust was characterised by the highest concentration of peptides before digestion and after digestion (3.13 and 5.88 mg/mL, respectively), and the DH was 36.29%."
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Insect Protein Source: One Grasshopper Salad Please - Edgy Labs

Insect Protein Source: One Grasshopper Salad Please - Edgy Labs | Insect protein | Scoop.it
If you can’t warm up to the idea of inviting your family to a feast of sautéed crickets, caterpillar bread, and a grasshopper salad, lucky for you the future of nutrition may lie inside a beetle shell. 

As the global population increases, so will our need for high-yield, low-impact sources of protein that are more efficient and cost-effective than current livestock practices. While companies and researchers alike are exploring insect-sourced protein as a viable alternative, will insects really prove to be a more sustainable alternative to animals?

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How Eating Insects Could Save The Planet

How Eating Insects Could Save The Planet | Insect protein | Scoop.it
There’s no doubt about it, most Western people are revolted by the idea of entomophagy. This has never mattered before. But, in the future, meat consumption will not only become more expensive (a predicted 18–26 percent between now and 2025) but the ethical and environmental implications of meat consumption will increase along with the world’s population. According to the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation, insects are the sustainable food source of the future. For example crickets need six times less feed than cattle, four times less than sheep, and twice less than pigs to produce the same amount of protein. Besides, they can be fed organic waste. But despite efforts to re-educate their palate, the Western mainstream continues to find the idea of eating insects loathsome.

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Rising Prosperity Means Getting to Eat More Meat and Seafood - Reason.com

Rising Prosperity Means Getting to Eat More Meat and Seafood - Reason.com | Insect protein | Scoop.it
That's ok, because human ingenuity and free markets satisfy increased demand.
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AquacultureEurope2016: Shrimp Biofloc Study Wins Lindsay Laird Award Winner

AquacultureEurope2016: Shrimp Biofloc Study Wins Lindsay Laird Award Winner | Insect protein | Scoop.it
UK - A study into the effects of white spot in shrimp farming units has won this year's prestigious Lindsay Laird Award.
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The Ecological Case for Continued Meat Consumption

The Ecological Case for Continued Meat Consumption | Insect protein | Scoop.it
Recent studies suggest that including some meat in the diet may actually be the most responsible approach if society hopes to feed the planet sustainably and responsibly. Can beef be part of this solution?
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Insects Are As Good A Source Of Iron As Beef

Insects Are As Good A Source Of Iron As Beef | Insect protein | Scoop.it
New research has found that buffalo worms are a better source of iron than beef, and grasshoppers aren’t far behind.

Insects are an attractive replacement for food animals like cows. They’re high in protein and relatively low in fat, which makes them a healthy option. They also have environmental advantages over livestock, like not needing a lot of land to graze on. And they don’t fart as much as cows, who make the greenhouse gas methane.

But can insects really take over the role meat plays in our diets? Meat is more than just protein; it also has minerals like iron and calcium. Nutrition researcher Gladys Latunde-Dada of King’s College London wanted to find out.

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Click here to support Converting Organic Waste Into Food by Saad Ringa

Click here to support Converting Organic Waste Into Food by Saad Ringa | Insect protein | Scoop.it
Converting Organic Waste Into Food

Modern societies produce a lot of organic waste. This waste is usually sent away to be buried in landfills. What if we could convert all the waste back to food? We can close the cycle!

By using Black Soldier Fly Larvae (BSFL), we are converting waste into high protein feed for chickens, fish, and other livestock. The process also produces a rich compost and liquid fertilizer.

Current Production

We have been experimenting with BSFL for six years now. Up until last year, we have been harvesting about 15 lbs per month during the wild BSF season, which is from June to October. The larvae were fed to our small flock of chickens. This year, we were able to produce up to 85 lbs per month, with the first harvest in mid May. We accomplished this by saving larvae from the previous year and starting the season in a small greenhouse-type setup. We diverted more than 2,500 lbs of organic material from the landfill and our gardens benefited from loads of compost and liquid fertilizer.

Via Ana C. Day, Jean-François Kleinfinger
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Bug-eating chef hosts new YouTube series

Bug-eating chef hosts new YouTube series | Insect protein | Scoop.it

Starting Wednesday, Chef Don Peavy will host a nine-episode web series, “Buggin' Out,” that producers hope will make you want to eat bugs.

The show will debut on Facebook and YouTube, focused on "entomophagy,” the practice of eating insects.


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Ana C. Day's curator insight, November 2, 1:58 PM

"It's entertaining, but also an attempt to get more people used to the idea, as insects contain protein and nutrients and can be raised with less environmental damage than livestock farming.

The show is set in a Brooklyn, New York, kitchen with co-host Mosquito, a bearded magic dragon, as well as insect-eating human guests."

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Bugs in Bangkok before Bugs in Europe! - 4ento

Bugs in Bangkok before Bugs in Europe! - 4ento | Insect protein | Scoop.it
Insects as Food and Feed constitute one of the major options for a future source of protein to feed our fast growing population expected to reach about 9 billion in 2050 : at AETS in Bangkok where I am working in this field, it has been understood and there is an increasing move and development to the Ento way !

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So, what happened at FoodHack Geneva? – FoodHack – Medium

So, what happened at FoodHack Geneva? – FoodHack – Medium | Insect protein | Scoop.it
9:23pm: Word about the treats arrival quickly spreads and already a group has formed around Sylvia Schibli Saputra from Grimiam who is preparing the different delicacies for us to try.
9:30pm: The stage is set, 3 different kinds of insects cooked and ready, some straight from Sylvia's garden this morning. Accompanying is an appetiser of mash potatoes, coriander and maggots along with “insect breakfast bars”.
Sylvia explains the reasoning behind insects for human consumption and how they can be a part of our daily diet. Following this, she invites everyone to a taste. Whilst some people jump forward to have a try others crawl backward waiting to see their fellow participants reactions first.

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Meet the FoodBytes! Boulder Winners: Mad Agriculture, The Honest Stand & FarmRaiser |

Meet the FoodBytes! Boulder Winners: Mad Agriculture, The Honest Stand & FarmRaiser | | Insect protein | Scoop.it
Last week, Mad Agriculture, The Honest Stand and FarmRaiser took home the top prizes at FoodBytes! Boulder, a pitch competition meets networking event that brings food, agribusiness and tech startups together with investors, executives and industry leaders.

After having received over 150 applications from around the world, 20 companies were selected to compete for three esteemed awards – the Judges’ Choice Award, the Peoples’ Choice Award and the Highly Commended Award – which took place at the University of Colorado Boulder at Folsom Fields’ Byron R. White Club.

Judges’ Choice Award: Mad Agriculture

From the impressive ten pitch company finalists, the esteemed panel of FoodBytes! Boulder judges were tasked with selecting the company they felt best demonstrated industry creativity, sustainable practices, growth potential and social innovation. Boulder-based company, Mad Agriculture, took home the honor. Mad Agriculture harnesses the nutrient recycling abilities of insects to turn food waste into a protein rich feed supplement, lessening dependence on unsustainable ingredients like fishmeal and soy. “Two years ago, we saw an obvious need for a solution to two growing problems – food waste, and the increasing cost of feed for farmers,” said Mad Agriculture co-founder and Boulder local Phil Taylor. “Receiving the Judges’ Choice Award at FoodBytes! Boulder – from some of the leading minds in food and agriculture – confirms that the need is real, and we’re thrilled to use this platform to further our work.”

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Certification of Hatcheries Lifts NZ King Salmon to Three-Star BAP | Aquaculture Directory

Certification of Hatcheries Lifts NZ King Salmon to Three-Star BAP | Aquaculture Directory | Insect protein | Scoop.it
New Zealand King Salmon is now eligible to offer three-star Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) salmon following the certification of its three salmon hatcheries, the Global Aquaculture Alliance announced in early November.

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Bugs Contain The Same Amount Of Nutrients As Sirloin Steak

Bugs Contain The Same Amount Of Nutrients As Sirloin Steak | Insect protein | Scoop.it
The future of sustainable eating is here - and you’re probably not going to like it.

A study has revealed that eating bugs such as crickets, grasshoppers, buffalo worms and mealworms provides the same amount of nutrients (protein included) as sirloin steak. 

This is great news for the environment and even the economy, says Katie Link from Newsy in the video above, as farming insects is cheaper and more sustainable than raising cattle.

It’s also supposedly healthier to eat bugs, than it is to eat meat from animals, as bugs have more nutritional value. That’s according to a study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2015, which compared edible insects with beef, pork and chicken, and found that bugs won hands down in terms of healthfulness. 

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Eating Bugs, the Next Food Frontier - Luxe Beat Magazine

Eating Bugs, the Next Food Frontier - Luxe Beat Magazine | Insect protein | Scoop.it
The zany and informative series, developed by ChefPV along with Justin Noto and ONErpm Studios, introduces the concept of insects as food in a entertaining and educational way. The series is set in a Brooklyn kitchen along with co-host Mosquito, a bearded magic dragon, with expert guests making appearances such as renowned entomophagy advocate David Gracer, Founder & Director of Little Herds Robert Nathan Allen and Critter Bitters founders Lucy Knops and Julia Plevin. During the series, ChefPV has had to face, and conquer, a deep-seated fear of insects that many Americans share.

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Feature: Why insects could be the ideal animal feed

Feature: Why insects could be the ideal animal feed | Insect protein | Scoop.it
Advocates say raising livestock and fish on insect meal is easier on the planet
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Study: Farm-Raised Salmon offers Lowest Overall Environmental Cost for Protein | Aquaculture Directory

Study: Farm-Raised Salmon offers Lowest Overall Environmental Cost for Protein | Aquaculture Directory | Insect protein | Scoop.it
A detailed assessment of consumers’ most common protein choices shows salmon raised in the ocean have the lowest overall cost to the environment. A new study prepared for the BCSFA by Ottawa based RIAS Inc.
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Top Eco Fish Choices - University Health News

Top Eco Fish Choices - University Health News | Insect protein | Scoop.it
Seafood is good for your health, but choose sustainable fish to protect our food supply.
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