Inquiry learning
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Rescooped by Mary Mahoney from Web tools to support inquiry based learning
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teaching inquiry learning


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Wendy de Jong's curator insight, January 11, 2014 8:56 AM

A cute little video about inquiry learning from Australia. It has a focus on HSIE but the principles of inquiry are still worth considering.

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Virtual Information Inquiry: Information Search Process (ISP)

I was today listening a lecture by Carol Kuhlthau and thought to post this to remind us from guided inquiry method and the zone of intervention. 

 

Greetings, Anu 


Via Anu Ojaranta, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Rescooped by Mary Mahoney from Web tools to support inquiry based learning
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11 Ways to Make an Inquiry-Based Classroom

11 Ways to Make an Inquiry-Based Classroom | Inquiry learning | Scoop.it

How do you turn a traditional entrenched classroom into one that's inquiry-based? By taking things one step at a time. Here are fifteen ways you can try; maybe one or more will resonate with your teaching style.


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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, May 4, 2013 5:09 PM

Inquiry learning is question driven.

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Pedagogies of engagement in science: A comparison of PBL, POGIL, and PLTL

Problem-based learning, process-oriented guided inquiry learning, and peer-led team learning are student-centered, active-learning pedagogies commonly used in science education. The characteristic features of each are compared and contrasted to enable new practitioners to decide which approach or combination of approaches will suit their particular situation.


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Brigham French's curator insight, July 18, 2013 5:03 PM

Article defines project base learning (PGL), process-oriented guided inquiry learning (POGIL), and peer-led team learning are student-centered (PLTL). Showing the differences and comparisons of the different teaching methods. 

Mary Starry's curator insight, August 24, 2013 11:31 PM

I find that I tend to use various combinations of all of these.  

Rescooped by Mary Mahoney from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Cultivating a Positive Environment for Students

Cultivating a Positive Environment for Students | Inquiry learning | Scoop.it
High school English teacher Larry Ferlazzo offers advice on helping students develop more positive emotions, which he says can enhance their attention and higher-order thinking skills.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Flipping classrooms increases collaboration, higher thinking | Other Views | NewsObserver.com

Flipping classrooms increases collaboration, higher thinking | Other Views | NewsObserver.com | Inquiry learning | Scoop.it
This month Luke Miles, eighth-grade social studies teacher at Durant Road Middle School, was named Wake County Teacher of the Year and was praised for using the flipped classroom technique.
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Inquiry Pedagogy

Inquiry Pedagogy | Inquiry learning | Scoop.it
References: Carroll, K. (2012). Pedagogy Revised. Retrieved from http://leo.acu.edu.au/course/view.php?id=6193 Watkins, C. and Mortimer, P. (1999). Pedagogy: what do we know? In P. Mortimer (Ed),...
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5 Tools to Help Students Learn How to Learn | MindShift

5 Tools to Help Students Learn How to Learn | MindShift | Inquiry learning | Scoop.it

Helping students learn how to learn: That’s what most educators strive for, and that’s the goal of inquiry learning. That skill transfers to other academic subject areas and even to the workplace where employers have consistently said that they want creative, innovative and adaptive thinkers. Inquiry learning is an integrated approach that includes kinds of learning: content, literacy, information literacy, learning how to learn, and social or collaborative skills. Students think about the choices they make throughout the process and the way they feel as they learn. Those observations are as important as the content they learn or the projects they create.

“We want students thinking about their thinking,” said Leslie Maniotes a teacher effectiveness coach in the Denver Public Schools and one of the authors of Guided Inquiry: Learning in the 21st Century. “We want them reflecting on the process and the content.” Inquiry learning works best on longer, deep dive projects when students have to create something of their own out of what they’ve found.

 

“When they are able to see where they came from and where they got to it is very powerful for them.”

A good example is a long term research project. There are several common stages in longer projects and researchers have studied how students feel, think and act around the different stages. Students initiate the project, select a topic, explore it further, begin to formulate an approach, collect specific materials relevant to a focus and finally present on their findings.

During the process, students will go through different stages of emotions. They might feeluncertainty as they begin, optimism when they select a project, then confusion or frustration when they’ve gathered a lot of information and don’t know where to go with it. As they begin to sift through the information, they gain a sense of clarity and direction and begin formulating and executing the project. By the end of the process, they’ll have a sense of satisfaction or disappointment on the outcome of their presentation.

[RELATED READING: Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways Into Inquiry Learning]

Understanding how students may feel as they move through the stages of inquiry offers educators the opportunity to intervene at critical moments when frustration threatens to derail them. Research shows that letting students spend longer time exploring a topic before choosing helps them choose something worthy of inquiry. “Jumping right into identifying a question leads to low level learning,” said Maniotes. She offers specific and simple tools to help guide the inquiry learning process.

FIVE TOOLS TO GUIDE INQUIRY LEARNING

1. An Inquiry Community is the class itself. Each member is exploring a topic related to the same class unit and students can help one another clarify ideas. “All of this is set within the social context of an inquiry community,” said Maniotes. “We value that community and we’re using all these other tools to inform the level of conversation we might have within that community.”2. An Inquiry Circle is a small group where students can talk to one another around a specific topic that fits within the umbrella of the broader class unit. Inquiry circles are a place for students to talk out all their wild ideas and work best when instructors leave them alone.3. The Inquiry Journal is one of the most powerful tools in the inquiry learning repertoire and should be utilized throughout the process. It’s a place for students to reflect on both the process and the content they discover as they go along. It’s important to emphasize to students that the journals should be used to reflect on how he or she learns best and what feelings come up at different points in the process. It’s meant to give them a moment to stop and think about what they’ve read and why it’s important. The journal can also be a good bridge between the student and instructor.4. The Inquiry Log helps students to keep track of the learning journey and every choice, change in direction or exciting moment along the way. “When they are able to see where they came from and where they got to it is very powerful for them,” said Maniotes.5. The Inquiry Chart is a great tool to help students identify a central question. They can chart, brainstorm and map their ideas in many ways. Getting them down on paper can help visualize what areas of research are well fleshed out and would make good focus points and which are tangential. Part of inquiry learning is teaching students how to make good academic decisions on resources and content, as well as recognizing when persistence is needed to dig deeper.

Taken together these five tools, which are deceptively simple, can give students the experience of deeper inquiry, insight into their own learning habits and preferences, as well as the experience of working through emotions that arise during the process. All these experiences help them to encounter the next challenge effectively, even when not being asked to follow a rigid process.

[RELATED READING: How to Fuel Students' Learning Through Their Interests]

Inquiry learning should also be a social and language-based process. “Inquiry tools support English language use,” said Maniotes. “Students are able to use authentic language and they are constantly speaking, reading, writing, and viewing throughout the process.” It also helps to set clear expectations for the project and to routinely use the tools so students recognize their function. When instructors reflect on how the tools are used at various points, modeling meta-cognitive processing about how the tools support the inquiry process, students do more of that too. “If students hear that kind of talk then they know how to do it themselves,” said Maniotes.

The tools also give instructors a way to assess student learning along the way. This type of formative assessment gives teachers a chance to intervene and shape the inquiry process or offer encouragement. The journal and log especially tell a teacher a lot about the process each student went through to arrive at a final presentation, offering far more data points for assessment.

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Brigham French's curator insight, July 19, 2013 2:44 PM

Five tools used in guided imagery to help the different ways you can present the information to the students. Demonstrates the diversity of scaffolding to meet different learning patters. 

 

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Sample Guided Inquiry Chemistry Lessons

Sample Guided Inquiry Chemistry Lessons | Inquiry learning | Scoop.it

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Brigham French's comment, July 19, 2013 2:40 PM
Guided inquiry for chemistry lesson, describes different lessons to help identify misconceptions and how to identify them to help consolidate understanding.
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How are librarians involved in guided inquiry?

How are librarians involved in guided inquiry? | Inquiry learning | Scoop.it
Carol Collier Kuhlthau (2010) Guided Inquiry: School Libraries in the 21st Century, School Libraries Worldwide, January 2010, Volume 16, Number 1, 17-28

The 21st century calls for new skills,...

 

Link to full text research paper.


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Glenn Fitzpatrick's curator insight, October 7, 2015 9:16 AM

This article by Carol Kuhlthau looks at the importance of the partnership between school librarians and teachers in supporting students to learn in an increasingly complex information environment. It discusses what it takes to transform a school into a 21st century learning space and the role the librarian plays in this. Especially valuable for me was the explanation of the collaborative teams needed for successful inquiry and the role of the librarian within these teams. 

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Higher Order Questions: A Path to Deeper Learning

Higher Order Questions: A Path to Deeper Learning | Inquiry learning | Scoop.it
Watch a lesson that helps students build higher order thinking skills.

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iPad is for Creating

iPad is for Creating | Inquiry learning | Scoop.it

"What do students need to be doing with their iPads to unlock their higher level thinking skills?"


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Johanni Larjanko's curator insight, February 15, 2013 1:46 AM

kreativt tänkande med hjälp av maskiner?

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Can Twitter open up a new space for learning, teaching and thinking?

Can Twitter open up a new space for learning, teaching and thinking? | Inquiry learning | Scoop.it
Two academics discuss the pros and cons of using Twitter as a learning tool to encourage instinctive thinking in higher education

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Erik Volk's comment, March 15, 2013 4:43 PM
Eager to try out Twitter as a learning tool on mobile devices. However, this article does highlight possible legal issues with information being transmitted.
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White Paper: How to Teach Students to Evaluate Information

White Paper: How to Teach Students to Evaluate Information | Inquiry learning | Scoop.it

A Key Common Core Skill > Eye On Education

 

The importance of critical thinking is noted in the new national standards. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Initiative directly identifies higher-order thinking skills as critical to achieving career and college readiness for all students.


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