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Visible Thinking Routines: Extend & Deepen Students Understanding

Visible Thinking Routines: Extend & Deepen Students Understanding | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, April 9, 3:38 AM

These routines have classroom merit, too, as we're trying to get students to think.

Julienne Feeney's curator insight, April 9, 4:21 PM

Complements MYP principles and Learner Profiles beautifully...

Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, April 12, 10:26 AM

This has so much relevance when teaching students questioning and critical thinking skills. Great tool for developing Inquiry based learning strategies. Also, I love an infographic!

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Reflection in the Learning Process, Not As An Add On

Reflection in the Learning Process, Not As An Add On | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Is it personality? Are some people born with it? Can it be learned? I am talking about REFLECTION. At the beginning of the week, I had the opportunity to be part of a workshop during our pre-servic...

Via Beth Dichter
Helen Teague's insight:

Sometimes reflection is considered a throw-away or close activity when there are a few extra minutes of classtime leftover. But Reflection is a key component of learning.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 3, 7:22 PM

As teachers we reflect on our practice. Do we ask students to reflect on their practice? Do we share with them why reflection is important in the learning practice?

This post looks at why reflection should be a part of learning. Learn about four criteria that Dewey considered in his writings on reflection. See two visualizations that explore reflection. The first (shown above) looks at various platforms that might be used to help students reflect (lots of opportunities to use technology here) and the second one expands the KWL chart to a KWHLAQ...which stands for:

* Know - What do I know?

* Want - What do I want to know?

* How - How will I find out?

* Learn - What have I learned?

* Action - What action will I take?

* Questions - What questions do I have.

This second chart provides ideas for the Where and How that are analog and digital.

This post is very comprehensive and has many examples of students reflections that range from Kindegarten through Grade 10. There is much to learn and explore so be prepared to take some time. 

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 3, 9:41 PM

There is a link with an article using Dewey's thinking about reflection and learning.

Sue Alexander's curator insight, April 5, 2:30 PM

Visualizations rock! I wonder why I think that....?

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Google Glass Journalism Course is Coming to USC - AppNewser

Google Glass Journalism Course is Coming to USC - AppNewser | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Google Glass Journalism Course is Coming to USC
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The Already Existent Future Of The Age of Context

The Already Existent Future Of The Age of Context | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Robert Scoble and Shel Israel's new book, The Age of Context, brings to light a new reality that most of us are starting to sense: a future brought together by the commonality of the use of the technologies of mobile devices, sensors, data...

Via Marylene Delbourg-Delphis
Helen Teague's insight:

this book on Wishlist

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Mindsets: Why Do Some People Learn Faster?

Mindsets: Why Do Some People Learn Faster? | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Do we ignore mistakes, brushing them aside for the sake of our self-confidence? Or do we investigate the errors, seeking to learn from the snafus? The latter approach, suggests a series of studies, could make you learn faster.

 

Jonah Lehrer writes:

 

One of the essential lessons of learning, which is that people learn how to get it right by getting it wrong again and again."

 

"Education isn’t magic. Education is the wisdom wrung from failure."

 

"A new study, forthcoming in Psychological Science, and led by Jason Moser at Michigan State University, expands on this important concept. The question at the heart of the paper is simple: Why are some people so much more effective at learning from their mistakes? After all, everybody screws up. The important part is what happens next. Do we ignore the mistake, brushing it aside for the sake of our self-confidence? Or do we investigate the error, seeking to learn from the snafu?"

 

Growth Mindset 

 

"It turned out that those subjects with a growth mindset were significantly better at learning from their mistakes. Because the subjects were thinking about what they got wrong, they learned how to get it right."

 

"Fear of failure (fixed mindset) can actually inhibit learning."

 

Praise: How Matters

 

Students praised for their intelligence almost always chose to bolster their self-esteem by comparing themselves with students who had performed worse on the test.

 

In contrast, kids praised for their hard work were more interested in the higher-scoring exams. They wanted to understand their mistakes, to learn from their errors, to figure out how to do better.

 

The experience of failure had been so discouraging for the “smart” kids that they actually regressed.

 

The problem with praising kids for their innate intelligence — the “smart” compliment — is that it misrepresents the psychological reality of education. It encourages kids to avoid the most useful kind of learning activities, which is when we learn from our mistakes.

 

Foresaking Self-Improvement for the Sake of Self-Confidence

 

Unless we experience the unpleasant symptoms of being wrong the mind will never revise its models.

 

We’ll keep on making the same mistakes, forsaking self-improvement for the sake of self-confidence. Samuel Beckett had the right attitude: “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.”

 

 


Via Mel Riddile
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Tim Malone's curator insight, March 10, 11:18 PM

If something interests you, you'll learn faster and more effectively. It's called engagement!

Carol Rine's curator insight, March 11, 6:56 PM

My Cheetah Chat two weeks ago was about the importance of a GROWTH mindset.

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Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results

Wirearchies = Adaptive, Two Way Flow of Power, Knowledge, with a Focus on Results | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

Harold Jarche features Chee Chin Liew’s presentation on moving from hierarchies to teams at BASF.  It shows how IT Services used their technology platforms to enhance networking, knowledge-sharing, and collaboration.  

 

It features an approach to “building flows of information into pertinent, useful and just-in-time knowledge” so that...  knowledge can flow in order to foster trust and credibility.

      

______________________________

    

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.   ...It means giving up control. 

   

_______________________________
       
Creating this two-way flow of dialogue, practice, expertise, and interest, can be the foundation of a wirearchy.

In complex environments, weak hierarchies and strong networks are the best organizing principle.

 

....many companies today have strong networks...coupled with strong central control. Becoming a wirearchy requires new organizational structures that incorporate communities, networks, and cooperative behaviours. It means giving up control. The job of those in leaderships roles is to help the network make better decisions. 

Related tools & posts by Deb:

 

See the companion post about Holacracy, here.

 

Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here, via REVELN Tools     Beyond Resilience: Black Swans, Anti-Fragility and Change

      

Beyond Resilience: Givers, Takers, Matchers and Anti-Fragile Systems

      

 Co-Creation in Theory U: Leading from the Future as it Emerges & the Road to Commitment

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN, bill woodruff
Helen Teague's insight:

well worth the reading time.

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Critical Thinker's curator insight, February 25, 3:48 PM

Communication flow drives forward movement and success! What are ways you can improve communications?

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 26, 11:50 AM

Holacracies, wirearchies and feedback rich cultures are one of the key ways organizations can adapt to disruptive change, or so it is beginning to look.   It will take solid leadership to change the nature of control and power in new millenium organizations, with unconventional larger organizations. like Zappos, leading the way.  ~  D

BhanuNagender's curator insight, March 7, 4:26 AM

 Manufacturers of Custom Shaped Cold Air Inflatables including Giant Character shapes and  Product Replicas also Rooftop Balloons specializing in custom inflatables for advertising, manufactured in Hyderabad city, India - http://www.inflatablecostumes.com

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Assessment for Learning: 5 Key Strategies for Higher Student Achievement

Assessment for Learning: 5 Key Strategies for Higher Student Achievement | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Assessment for Learning | 5 Strategies for Higher Student Achievement ("@MarkHess98: When students are given clear learning targets, frequent, meaningful feedback...achievement soars.http://t.co/1SxNqM2A5b")...

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Kotter International - The 8-Step Process for Leading Change

Kotter International - The 8-Step Process for Leading Change | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Kotter International - 8-Step Process for Leading Change
Helen Teague's insight:

Shared by Dr. Paul Sparks, Kotter's 8-step Process for Leading Change---70% of all major change efforts in organizations fail. Why do they fail? Because organizations often do not take the holistic approach required to see the change through.

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9 Tips for Creating a Sense of Community for Distance Learners

9 Tips for Creating a Sense of Community for Distance Learners | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
With ever-increasing opportunities for online learning, educators must find new ways to engage their students and create a sense of community in a virtual world.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Robert Rodenbaugh's curator insight, March 8, 8:08 AM

A great list of suggestions, but overall and taking a look at #9, the key is connecting, building a relationship. Let's make sure we keep social-emotional learning (SEL) always in mind as a priority when we look to creating the education of tomorrow.

Allison Anderson's curator insight, March 10, 9:28 AM

Geared toward educational settings, but I believe these are good ideas for creating a sense of community in a corporate setting.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 14, 12:24 AM
9 Tips for Creating a Sense of Community for Distance Learners
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Education 3.0--Where Students Create Their Own Learning Experiences

Education 3.0--Where Students Create Their Own Learning Experiences | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Education 3.0--Where Students Create Their Own Learning Experiences
Helen Teague's insight:

“Here, the curriculum is authentically personalized, based on thinking and making (which is internal and intrinsic) rather than an ability to parrot a carefully choreographed ‘performance’ (which is not).” ~Terry Heick

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Education 3.0: Students as Connectors, Creators, & Constructivists - by Dave Guymon

Education 3.0: Students as Connectors, Creators, & Constructivists - by Dave Guymon | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

The way that users have utilized the Internet has changed since its inception. References to Web 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 allude to an evolved relationship with online information and interactivity.


Via Felix Jacomino
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Ness Crouch's curator insight, March 1, 3:25 PM

Education 3.0 is it coming or is it already here? I guess that depends on where you are at with your understanding of education and how students learn

niftyjock's curator insight, March 2, 6:34 PM

How does a student know what they need to learn?

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, March 4, 7:15 AM

EDUCACIÓN 3.0 --->> NOSOTROS INSISTIMOS EN EL MODELO  - 0.1

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Prions Are Key to Preserving Long-Term Memories

Prions Are Key to Preserving Long-Term Memories | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

The famed protein chain reaction that made mad cow disease a terror may be involved in helping to ensure that our recollections don't fade.

 

Prions are proteins with two unusual properties: First, they can switch between two possible shapes, one that is stable on its own and an alternate conformation that can form chains. Second, the chain-forming version has to be able to trigger others to change shape and join the chain. Say that in the normal version the protein is folded so that one portion of the protein structure—call it "tab A"—fits into its own "slot B." In the alternate form, though, tab A is available to fit into its neighbor's slot B. That means the neighbor can do the same thing to the next protein to come along, forming a chain or clump that can grow indefinitely.

 

For a brain cell, keeping a memory around is a lot of work. A variety of proteins need to be continually manufactured at the synapse, the small gap that interfaces one cell to another. But whereas a cell may have a multitude of synapses, the protein synthesis that grows and maintains the connection only occurs at specific ones that have been activated. Work in the sea slug Aplysia (a favorite of neuroscientists because of its large cells) showed that a protein called CPEB, for cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding, is necessary to keep a synapse activated. CPEB acts as a prion.

 

Once the prion's chain reaction gets started it's self-perpetuating, and thus the synapse can be maintained after the initial trigger is gone—perhaps for a lifetime. But that still doesn't explain how the first prion is triggered or why it only happens in certain synapses and not others.

 

An answer comes from Si's work on fruit flies, published February 11 in PLoS Biology. Sex—and, in particular, male courtship behavior—is an ideal realm in which to test memory: If a female is unreceptive, the male will remember this and stop trying to court her. Earlier, Si’s team showed that if the fly's version of CPEB, called Orb2, is mutated so that it cannot act as a prion, the insect briefly remembers that the female is unreceptive but that memory fades over the course of a few days.

 

Now, Si's team has figured out how the cell turns on the machinery responsible for the persistence of memory—and how the memory can be stabilized at just the right time and in the right place.

 

Before the memory is formed a fly's neuron is full of a version of the prion called Orb2B. Although this version can switch shapes to form prions' characteristic clumps, it can't get started without the related protein Orb2A. In this week's paper Si and colleagues untangled the multipartnered dance that controls Orb2A's role. First, a protein called TOB binds to Orb2A, allowing it to persist intact in the cell. (Normally, it would be broken down within a few hours.) Once stabilized it needs to have a phosphate tag attached, and this is done by another protein called Lim kinase.

 

Crucially, Lim kinase is only activated when the cell receives an electrical impulse—and only targeted at that synapse, not any other synaptic connections the cell might also be making. That means that the prion chain reaction is turned on in the specific time and place it's needed. This, researchers say, means the cell has a mechanism to stabilize some synapses but not others—potentially explaining why some of our memories fade, whereas others last a lifetime.

 

Although work so far on these proteins has been in yeast, sea slugs, flies and mice, the human CPEB may operate in the same way to preserve memories. The next steps, both researchers agree, are to develop better techniques to see where in the brain prions are activated, and to dig into more questions about how the prion process is regulated. One burning question: When we forget, does that mean that the prion's chain reaction has been halted?


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Helen Teague
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Eli Levine's curator insight, February 20, 12:35 PM

They may try to make us forget, and, indeed, they may actually succeed.

 

However, science works both ways, for positive uses and for negative as well.

 

Memory loss may be helpful to some, while memory retention is good for all.

Way cool science.

 

Hope it doesn't effect us negatively in some way.

 

Think about it. 

Nacho Vega's curator insight, February 21, 12:20 PM

"For a #brain cell, keeping a #memory around is a lot of work"

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Sources and Tags: Dennis O'Connor's Curating Secrets

Sources and Tags: Dennis O'Connor's Curating Secrets | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

There's no question that Dennis O'Connor has found much success on Scoop.it. It wasn't all coincidental, though. Dennis shared with us two of his best curation secrets and tricks:

 

1. Develop multiple sources for your topics
It's important to carefully think through the keywords that you set for your topic so that Scoop.it can crawl the web and provide you with interesting and relevant content and inspiration. In addition to taking full advantage of this, Dennis also uses other tools like Twitter, StumbleUpon, and Prismatic to find content to share on Scoop.it. Once he finds the content he wants to share with his audience, he uses Scoop.it as his social media hub to add value to that content and share it everywhere.

 

2. Tag your posts
Dennis takes a lot of time to tag each of his posts. This allows him, he explained, to assemble publications based upon his tagged topics. When he's using his information on Scoop.it for his E-learning classes, it's easy for him to filter his Scoop.it pages based upon different subjects and easily compile a list of posts and articles on appropriate topics to provide to his students. Something interesting that Dennis does with his tagged articles is to pull them by subject and create "special editions" of his topics on his blog for special classes and events that he is teaching.


Via Ally Greer
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Lydia Gracia's curator insight, February 14, 2:22 AM

Les astuces de Dennis O'Connor pour une curation effective:

- Utilisation des tags et

- sélection des sources.

Lee Wise's curator insight, February 15, 8:34 PM

Graphic.  Informative.  Enjoy.  

Karen E Smith's curator insight, March 20, 5:33 AM

Thinking across systems to write without plagiarizing.

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The personal cost of applying for research grants

The personal cost of applying for research grants | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Academic research can be hugely stressful. Now comes evidence from Australia that the demands of applying for a research grant also carry an emotional toll
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The Evolution of Bloom's Taxonomy: Original to Revised to Digital

The Evolution of Bloom's Taxonomy: Original to Revised to Digital | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 4, 4:10 PM

Check out three versions of Bloom's Taxonomy in this visualization. It includes the original Bloom's, the revised Bloom's, and adds on the Digital Bloom's, which provides a range of suggestions as to how students may demonstrate each level. This is another visual that you may want to share with other teachers in your school.

Sue Alexander's curator insight, April 5, 2:21 PM

I love the clarity of the digital verbs! I think the specific content of the "doing" might allow for a bit of repositioning in the  chart, but it's certainly a great starting point in analyzing the tasks and output of a lesson.

Lee Hall's curator insight, April 7, 11:25 AM

It is interesting to see all of Bloom's side by side.

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How Gamification Led to a 260% increase in student activity

How Gamification Led to a 260% increase in student activity | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

"If you’re running an online course and you’re finding it difficult to keep your students engaged in your community you’ll be glad to know that gamification may be the tool you’re looking for to help inspire students to engage."


Via EDTC@UTB
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Kirsten Wilson's curator insight, March 27, 8:31 AM

Article with link to research supporting gamification.

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What Keeps Students Motivated to Learn?

What Keeps Students Motivated to Learn? | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
What keeps students motivated to learn? Relevance, connections, and their teachers' emotional investment, among just a few criteria.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 13, 6:44 PM

Who better to ask students what motivates them to learn but students, specifically students whom are part of the "deeper learning" movement (and a link to an article on "deeper learning" is in this post). This post shares ideas from seven students. The short hand version is below but much more detail is in the post.

* Integrated projects

* Interest-based and relevant

* Make it hands on

* Knowing teachers care

* Learning from failure

* Evaluating work

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How Do We Define and Measure “Deeper Learning”?

How Do We Define and Measure “Deeper Learning”? | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

 In preparing students for the world outside school, what skills are important to learn? 

Helen Teague's insight:

How do we define and measure deep learning? Mentions James Pellegrino's  Deeper Learning Report released by the National Research Council of the National Academies of Science in Washington.

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Higher Learning Technologies on KWWL


Via bill woodruff
Helen Teague's insight:

Apps with downloads in 60 countries

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What is your PKM routine? | Harold Jarche

What is your PKM routine? | Harold Jarche | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
What is your PKM routine? http://t.co/tiQPfudZCh via @hjarche

Via steve batchelder, bill woodruff
Helen Teague's insight:

never heard of PKM until this blog post...

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Once Upon a Fairy Tale: Teaching Revision as a Concept - ReadWriteThink

Once Upon a Fairy Tale: Teaching Revision as a Concept - ReadWriteThink | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Students use fractured fairy tales to practice revision and editing as separate activities when they write their own versions of fairy tales.

Via Florence Chia, Lynnette Van Dyke
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Thoughts on SNA and online learning

Thoughts on SNA and online learning | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Following the previous post... The structural paradigm of  Social Network Analysis (SNA) with its constitutive theory and methods, began to emerge around the 1930s, applied and influenced by a broa...

Via Susan Bainbridge
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Milena Bobeva's curator insight, March 1, 1:10 AM

Social Network Analysis should be a  paradigm for researching, designing, and evaluating not only online learning, but  the wider phenomenon of Education 3.0

luiy's curator insight, March 1, 4:21 PM

The connections within nodes in a network facilitate exchange of “resources”  which can be influenced by the quantity and quality of the linkages and interactions. Looking at online educational networks through a SNA lens is a way to establish wether the ways in which individuals connect with a particular environment may influence their access to information and knowledge. As Rita Kop states “the Web is portrayed as a democratic network on which peer to peer interaction might lead to a creative explosion and participative culture of activity” (Kop, 2012 p3) but how is this potential being exploited in education? What are the processes beyond this interaction and how can they be used to facilitate students access to information, knowledge and ideas?

 

The potential of social media in forming networks, extending students knowledge and translating this into academic achievement is impacted by a multitude of elements such as individuals’ attitudes (Morrison, 2002), University environment and socialisation processes (Yu et al., 2010). Other mechanisms influencing this process may be the particular educational practices and experiences, the success of connections, the dynamics in which participants negotiate the structure of the network and exchange practices and many others which can not be controlled.

 

This analysis can be enriched by Bordieau’s concept of “social capital”, which introduces a set of dynamics between the social dimension, the identity dimension (habitus) and the individual’s practice. In this system of reciprocal influences it is interesting to look at the transformation processes and effects of elements such as “weak ties”, “brokers”, “latent connections” and “structural holes” in the information flow within a network.

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Teachers Change Focus to Student Learning with PLCs

Teachers Change Focus to Student Learning with PLCs | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Helen Teague's insight:

How would an approach such as instituting a cross-collaborative PBL/PBL to create a campus-wide PLC change the status quo?

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Two Must Have Resources for Every Academic and Student Researchers

Two Must Have Resources for Every Academic and Student Researchers | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, February 23, 7:33 AM

I don't know about "must have" but it could be useful. 

Patricia Baker's curator insight, February 24, 3:29 AM

How to ensure higher order thinking is happening

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 14, 12:57 AM
Two Must Have Resources for Every Academic and Student Researchers
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Improving Working Memory: How Can You Enhance All Aspects of Learning?

Improving Working Memory: How Can You Enhance All Aspects of Learning? | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

"Do you really know something if you can’t remember it? I had a conversation with a fellow educator on this subject one semester, and we both came to the conclusion that knowledge relies almost exclusively on a student’s ability to remember what she has learned. Proof of knowledge comes from demonstration of knowledge; if you can’t recall a fact, then for all intents and purposes you never learned it. But where does that leave intelligence?"


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 11, 7:35 PM

This post notes that working memory plays a critical role in academic success. There is a detailed section that share the science behind working memory. This section is followed by 10 suggestions on how you could work with your students to increase their working memory. Two of the suggestions are:

* Chunking

* Interacting images

In is likely that we have students in our classes with poor working memory. One of the suggestions is The Automated Working Memory Assessment that they state may be used by a teacher. What would happen if we were able to learn that a struggling students needs to increase their working memory and had tools to assist them to learn how to do this? Would they become more successful? This is a post you may want to share with others in your building.