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10 ways to teach creativity in the classroom - TED Ed Blog

10 ways to teach creativity in the classroom - TED Ed Blog | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Education expert Sir Ken Robinson notes that in the factories of the 20th century, creativity was not valued. Yet in the startups of the 21st century, it’s critical for success. What can teachers do — right now — to prepare students for the world of the future? Below, 10 ways to teach creativity in the classroom:

Via John Evans
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Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, May 30, 10:27 PM

Creativity skills for the 21st century is vital for success. Teachers need to prepare students for the world of the future. Below, ten ways to teach creativity in the classroom:

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Inquiry in the Classroom: 7 Simple Tools To Get You Started

Inquiry in the Classroom: 7 Simple Tools To Get You Started | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
We know certain characteristics can be encouraged, but not taught, like curiosity. But teachers who use an inquiry based approach can provide techniques that help students learn the questions to ask that may spark a natural interest.

Via Becky Roehrs
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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, May 16, 7:56 PM

Nice descriptions of the seven steps, plus 7 tech tool suggestions, one to use for each step

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A dozen important brain based concepts

A dozen important brain based concepts | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

This page is dedicated to a dozen specific concepts from the most recent literature on brain based learning (educational neuroscience). The following list was compiled from those concepts most recommended by my graduate students as essential and important for teachers to know, understand, and put into practice. These students are also practicing teachers from all levels, from many different content areas, and at different levels of experience. The concepts discussed here were chosen for one or more of the following reasons – because they:

* Are in direct contradiction to traditional or historic teaching practices;
* Are currently missing from many schools or classrooms;
* Are important accommodations to students’ cognitive processing;
* Could radically change teachers’ presentation methods and the ways in which instruction is designed or delivered;
* Have the potential to help children be better students, as well as help them remember and retain information.


Via Miloš Bajčetić
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Peeragogy - P2P Foundation

Peeragogy - P2P Foundation | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

The ultimate test of peer learning is to organize a course without the direction of an instructor. Although subject-matter experts and skilled learning facilitators are always a bonus, it is becoming clear that with today's tools and some understanding of how to go about it, groups of self-directed learners can organize their own courses online. P2PU and other examples are harbingers. In Deschooling Society, Ivan Illich predicted in 1971 that learners of the future would find each other and use information technologies to form "learning webs" and "networks" -- prescient terms, considering that the ARPAnet was only two years old at the time. It didn't take long for my initial explorations to uncover dozens of nascent p2p learning platforms, new learning forms such as Massive Online Open Classes (MOOCs), and emerging theories of "paragogy." 


Via jean lievens
Helen Teague's insight:

From Jean Lievens: The ultimate test of peer learning is to organize a course without the direction of an instructor. Although subject-matter experts and skilled learning facilitators are always a bonus, it is becoming clear that with today's tools and some understanding of how to go about it, groups of self-directed learners can organize their own courses online. P2PU and other examples are harbingers. In Deschooling Society, Ivan Illich predicted in 1971 that learners of the future would find each other and use information technologies to form "learning webs" and "networks" -- prescient terms, considering that the ARPAnet was only two years old at the time. It didn't take long for my initial explorations to uncover dozens of nascent p2p learning platforms, new learning forms such as Massive Online Open Classes (MOOCs), and emerging theories of "paragogy." 

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Toward Peeragogy | DMLcentral

Toward Peeragogy | DMLcentral | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
"I (Howard Rheingold) also discovered, through a co-learner in a Rheingold U class, about "Paragogy" -- the nascent theory of peer to peer pedagogy. The co-learner, Charles Danoff, wrote a paper about it with Joseph Corneli: Paragogy: Synthesizing Individual and Organizational Learning. Searching on the word "paragogy" reveals more resources -- but not so many that they can't be surveyed quickly. The field is just beginning to grow.

I've been invited to deliver the 2011 Regents' Lecture at University of California, Berkeley. I intend to expand the paragogy universe by instigating a peer-created guide to pure peer-to-peer learning. I'm calling it "peeragogy." While "paragogy" is more etymologically correct, "peeragogy" is self-explanatory. In my lecture, I'll explain the evolution of my own pedagogy and reveal some of what I've discovered in the world of online self-organized learning. Then I will invite volunteers to join me in a two week hybrid of face-to-face seminars and online discussion. Can we self-organize our research, discover, summarize, and prioritize what is known through theory and practice, then propose, argue, and share a tentative resource guide for peeragogical groups? In theory, those who use our guide to pursue their own explorations can edit the guide to reflect new learning.

It's not exactly a matter of making my own role of teacher obsolete. If we do this right, I'll learn more about facilitating others to self-organize learning." http://dmlcentral.net/
Via ghbrett
Helen Teague's insight:

Howard Rheingold-- co-learners, Paragogy

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ghbrett's curator insight, December 17, 2012 2:49 PM

Recently there has been great interest in massive open online courses (MOOCs) as collaborative online learning experiences. This reviewer has been hearing, reading, listening, and talking about collaboration for education, training, and research for a couple decades now. Moving beyond the MOOC concept, Howard's article is a thoughtful piece on his and other's view of peeragogy. It contemplates the where and the how "peeragogy" will be a convergence of collaboration, self-learning, organized learning, MOOCs and other online collaborative resources. There is great potential here for advances in how to use technology. This will happen in a way that improves communication between and among students, teachers, and others.  Plus "peeragogy" will engage people to become participants in these processes rather than silent observers.

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Paragogy = peer learning

Paragogy = peer learning | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

"We endeavor to both describe the phenomenon of effective peer learning, and to prescribe key aspects of its best practice. These principles were conceived by turning Malcolm Knowles principles of adult education ("andragogy") by 90 degrees. In other words, we are looking at learning scenarios in which the standard assumptions about teaching and learning don't apply in a straightforward way. This typically includes learning in peer production environments, like the learning that takes place on mailing lists devoted to free software." 


Via Sue Hellman
Helen Teague's insight:

peer learning,  Malcolm Knowles principles of adult education

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Sue Hellman's curator insight, January 12, 2013 12:47 PM

~pedagogy

~andragogy

~paragogy

~autogogy

 

any more?

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Learning with 'e's: Theories for the digital age: Paragogy

One more notable feature of 21st Century learning is peer learning. Highlighting the fast paced nature of the web, Thomas and Seely-Brown (2011) suggest that peer learning can be both timely and transient.


Via L. García Aretio, juandoming
Helen Teague's insight:

Thomas and Seely-Brown (2011) --peer learning can be both timely and transient

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ParagogyPaper1

ParagogyPaper1 | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Helen Teague's insight:
Paragogy: Synergizing individual and organizational learningby Joseph Corneli and Charles Jeffrey Danoffpublished on Wikiversity, January 2011
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29 Quotes that Explain How to Become a Better Writer

29 Quotes that Explain How to Become a Better Writer | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
The best way to become a better writer is to write, but it doesn't hurt to get advice from the best. Here are 29 tips and pieces of wisdom from top writers.
Helen Teague's insight:

one quote for most days of the month!

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How to write a good abstract? — PhD blog * great content in Dunglish for PhD's

How to write a good abstract? — PhD blog * great content in Dunglish for PhD's | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
There are different types of abstracts, those for articles, and those for papers for a conference, congress or symposium The abstract for a paper has
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Exploding Classrooms

Exploding Classrooms | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

The ideas within Connectivism blow my mind in many good ways. I hear the words of U2’s “Where the Streets Have No Name”–I want to tear down the walls that hold me inside. I want to reach out and touch the flame.

Beginning with Siemens 2004 explanation these ideas seriously shake up traditional notions of classrooms and teachers:

Principles of Connectivism:

- Learning and knowledge rests in diversity of opinions.
- Learning is a process of connecting specialized nodes or information sources.
- Learning may reside in non-human appliances.
- Capacity to know more is more critical than what is currently known
- Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning.
- Ability to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a core skill.
- Currency (accurate, up-to-date knowledge) is the intent of all connectivist learning activities.
- Decision-making is itself a learning process. Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality. While there is a right answer now, it may be wrong tomorrow due to alterations in the information climate affecting the decision.

I love the idea that the learner must be the central agent in learning, that education happens always and everywhere, that learners need to make and maintain connections, and that learners need to make sense of constantly flowing streams of information.

And when I look at the slide below produced by Rick Schwier, it essentially shows my entire educational career from a student starting grade 1 in 1975 up to my teaching today. It delineates the process in which I have learned and tried to help others learn during massive changes in availability and production of information. So the question I (and all teachers) should be asking ourselves is how the “Social software + free and open content” in the most recent iteration bubble impacts the way education is happening under our guidance.


Via Miloš Bajčetić
Helen Teague's insight:

Principles of Connectivism:
- Learning and knowledge rests in diversity of opinions.
- Learning is a process of connecting specialized nodes or information sources.
- Learning may reside in non-human appliances.
- Capacity to know more is more critical than what is currently known
- Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning.
- Ability to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a core skill.
- Currency (accurate, up-to-date knowledge) is the intent of all connectivist learning activities.
- Decision-making is itself a learning process. Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality. While there is a right answer now, it may be wrong tomorrow due to alterations in the information climate affecting the decision.

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Editwright: 4 Steps to Spark Your Creativity

Editwright: 4 Steps to Spark Your Creativity | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Simple tricks for writers who need a little inspiration.
Helen Teague's insight:

Do you have a writing ritual? What is it?

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'Over testing risks squeezing out creative skills in pupils'

'Over testing risks squeezing out creative skills in pupils' | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Of course STEM subjects are vital, but the pendulum has swung too far in favour of a curriculum that undervalues creativity and critical thinking, says Vikas Pota

Via Miloš Bajčetić
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The Myth of “Micro-Learning”

The Myth of “Micro-Learning” | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
There's a new buzz phrase going around town these days in the L&D and talent development communities. That phrase is micro-learning. The infographic on the modern learner, published by Ber

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Engaging Students in Powerful Social Studies Teaching and Learning

Helen Teague's insight:

A recent and timely article addressing primary sources and the emotional quotient they contribute to learning

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Want Visibility? Tell Your Readers To Go Away (by showing them where cool things are)!

Want Visibility? Tell Your Readers To Go Away (by showing them where cool things are)! | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Helen Teague's insight:

From Robin Goode's scoop note: "

"If you can be a guide, a clearinghouse, a trusted place from where to learn, appreciate and understand more, there is no amount of outbound links that is going to counter the magnetic force you will express to those who are interested in what you are pointing to."


This is why the fear every company has about content curation -  talking about *others* in the same field - has not only no reason to exist, but it is also downright counterproductive as soon as others start using it.


Content curation is a venue to make sense of existing information to facilitate access, discovery, comparison, understanding, both on the side of who curates as well as on the one of those who benefit from it.


Part of my inspiration in becoming so passionate and interested in content curation, has been ignited by a post that appeared in 2004, on Robert Scoble's popular tech blog. 

In it, I read: "It's the new marketing... Instead of being desperate and saying "look at me look at me" you tell your readers to get lost.

Go someplace else.


What's the philosophy?

 

Those sites will take you to the coolest stuff on the Internet. And by doing that, Engadget and Gizmodo have BECOME the coolest places on the Internet. Just like Craig's List, Google, eBay."

 
Takeaway: The more valuable resources, info and tools you share with your audience/community the more trustworthy and reputable you will appear in their hearts and eyes. 

"Send your visitors away" is a simple but valuable content marketing advice and it is at the heart of what a good content curator does. Finding and sharing great resources that would have otherwise gone unnoticed. "

 


Read more:

http://www.masternewmedia.org/news/2004/11/03/want_some_attention_tell_your.htm ;

 

Robert Scoble original post: http://radio-weblogs.com/0001011/2004/10/31.html#a8544 ;

 

See also this slide deck I did in 2007: http://www.slideshare.net/RobinGood/be-your-own-boss ;
(check slides 21-22) 

 

Image credit: Showing direction by Shutterstock



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Robin Good's curator insight, April 30, 6:24 AM



"If you can be a guide, a clearinghouse, a trusted place from where to learn, appreciate and understand more, there is no amount of outbound links that is going to counter the magnetic force you will express to those who are interested in what you are pointing to."


This is why the fear every company has about content curation -  talking about *others* in the same field - has not only no reason to exist, but it is also downright counterproductive as soon as others start using it.


Content curation is a venue to make sense of existing information to facilitate access, discovery, comparison, understanding, both on the side of who curates as well as on the one of those who benefit from it.


Part of my inspiration in becoming so passionate and interested in content curation, has been ignited by a post that appeared in 2004, on Robert Scoble's popular tech blog. 

In it, I read: "It's the new marketing... Instead of being desperate and saying "look at me look at me" you tell your readers to get lost.

Go someplace else.


What's the philosophy?


Those sites will take you to the coolest stuff on the Internet. And by doing that, Engadget and Gizmodo have BECOME the coolest places on the Internet. Just like Craig's List, Google, eBay."


Takeaway: The more valuable resources, info and tools you share with your audience/community the more trustworthy and reputable you will appear in their hearts and eyes. 

"Send your visitors away" is a simple but valuable content marketing advice and it is at the heart of what a good content curator does. Finding and sharing great resources that would have otherwise gone unnoticed. 

 


Read more:

http://www.masternewmedia.org/news/2004/11/03/want_some_attention_tell_your.htm 


Robert Scoble original post: http://radio-weblogs.com/0001011/2004/10/31.html#a8544 


See also this slide deck I did in 2007: http://www.slideshare.net/RobinGood/be-your-own-boss 
(check slides 21-22) 


Image credit: Showing direction by Shutterstock






Ken Dickens's curator insight, April 30, 12:14 PM
Great explanation of why a Content Curation strategy is one of the best ways to build brand preference. We call this a "Give to Get" strategy. It builds relationships and trust. -Ken www.2080nonprofits.org
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Peeragogy Lit Review - Google Docs

I found this via Howard Rheingold

https://plus.google.com/u/0/105273428597140573510/posts/RkYnTESdw8d



A new term for me "peerogogy" - self organized peer learning.  It attracted me because I'm doing organized peer learning and dabbling in self-organized peer learning.


I have been involved in an experiment of self-organized peer learning for the past 18 months with colleagues in social media and nonprofits - and this gives me some underlying research/frameworks/thinkers to connect to better understand it.


From the document:


According to Charles Jeffrey Danoff, writer, educator, and organizer at P2PU, peeragogy (which he refers to as “paragogy”), is a collection of “the best practices of effective peer learning.” (Paragogy: Synergizing individual and organizational learning) It is also a theory of peer-to-peer learning and teaching that addresses the challenge of peer-producing a useful and supportive context for self-directed learning.


Danoff is currently putting together a book on peeragogy, in which he outlines 5 principles that encompass what the growing movement has been trying to accomplish:


Changing context as a decentered center.Meta-learning as a font of knowledge.Peers provide feedback that wouldn’t be there otherwise.Learning is distributed and nonlinear.Realize the dream if you can, then wake up!
Via Beth Kanter
Helen Teague's insight:

A new term for me "peerogogy" - self organized peer learning.  It attracted me because I'm doing organized peer learning and dabbling in self-organized peer learning.

 

I have been involved in an experiment of self-organized peer learning for the past 18 months with colleagues in social media and nonprofits - and this gives me some underlying research/frameworks/thinkers to connect to better understand it.

 

From the document:

 

According to Charles Jeffrey Danoff, writer, educator, and organizer at P2PU, peeragogy (which he refers to as “paragogy”), is a collection of “the best practices of effective peer learning.” (Paragogy: Synergizing individual and organizational learning) It is also a theory of peer-to-peer learning and teaching that addresses the challenge of peer-producing a useful and supportive context for self-directed learning.

 

Danoff is currently putting together a book on peeragogy, in which he outlines 5 principles that encompass what the growing movement has been trying to accomplish:

 

Changing context as a decentered center.Meta-learning as a font of knowledge.Peers provide feedback that wouldn’t be there otherwise.Learning is distributed and nonlinear.Realize the dream if you can, then wake up!
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Learning with 'e's: Theories for the digital age: Paragogy

Theories for the digital age: Paragogy: In previous posts in this series I have explored some of the characteris...

Via Maria Margarida Correia
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Paragogy | Fernando Santamaría

Paragogy | Fernando Santamaría | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

Via Ramiro Aduviri Velasco, juandoming
Helen Teague's insight:

P2P

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Digital Age Learning

Digital Age Learning | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

"...paragogy is an extension of the concept of scaffolding (proposed by Jerome Bruner), where knowledgeable others (teachers or peers) can create optimal learning environments in which students can learn more than they would if they were studying on their own. Paragogy takes scaffolding farther though, because peers are in an equal relationship. The exchange conditions are duplex - that is, they work both ways and reciprocal learning is achieved as learners connect with each other, share their content and ideas, and engage in dialogue. If this sounds familiar, it is exactly what happens informally day in, day out on Facebook, Twitter and other social networking sites."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
Helen Teague's insight:

extends the scaffolding concept of Jerome Bruner

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3 Significant Benefits Of Social Learning

3 Significant Benefits Of Social Learning | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
3 Significant Benefits Of Social Learning

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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ZAP s.a.'s curator insight, May 2, 2014 9:31 AM

This post explains how digital learning produces positive impact in students. This learning process represents the digital behavior of a new user.

Gust MEES's curator insight, February 21, 8:43 AM
3 Significant Benefits Of Social Learning


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Social-Learning


Mª Jesús García S.M.'s curator insight, February 26, 2:58 AM

Ventajas del aprendizaje social

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Rethinking the Emphasis on Standardized Testing

Rethinking the Emphasis on Standardized Testing | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Note: Today’s guest blog is from Robert Sun, chairman, president and CEO of Suntex International Inc. and inventor of First In Math, an online program designed for deep practice in mathematics. He i...
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5 Ways Mindfulness Changed My Life | Inspiration and Encouragement for Mindful Living

5 Ways Mindfulness Changed My Life | Inspiration and Encouragement for Mindful Living | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
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from talented writer Crystal Belle

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Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | EDUcation CHANGE | Teaching by Topic

Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | EDUcation CHANGE | Teaching by Topic | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

For years, Finland has been the by-word for a successful education system, perched at the top of international league tables for literacy and numeracy.

Pasi Silander, the city’s development manager, explained: “What we need now is a different kind of education to prepare people for working life.

.

“Young people use quite advanced computers. In the past the banks had lots of  bank clerks totting up figures but now that has totally changed.

.

“We therefore have to make the changes in education that are necessary for industry and modern society.”

.

Subject-specific lessons – an hour of history in the morning, an hour of geography in the afternoon – are already being phased out for 16-year-olds in the city’s upper schools. They are being replaced by what the Finns call “phenomenon” teaching – or teaching by topic. For instance, a teenager studying a vocational course might take “cafeteria services” lessons, which would include elements of maths, languages (to help serve foreign customers), writing skills and communication skills.

.

More academic pupils would be taught cross-subject topics such as the European Union - which would merge elements of economics, history (of the countries involved), languages and geography.

.


Via Gust MEES
Helen Teague's insight:

I wonder if this would work in the U.S.? Also, in Finland, students do not take standardized tests until the end of high school (Zhao, 2012, p. 111), so thankfully, perhaps the drill and kill process is diminished.


*Zhao, Y. (2012). World Class Learners. 

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Tony Guzman's curator insight, March 25, 10:19 AM

This article shares how Finland is changing how they teach children and adults. This is similar to the comments I recently shared from Stanford's president. Thoughts?

jmoreillon's curator insight, March 27, 9:42 AM

This is what school librarians have been doing forever!

María Florencia Perrone's curator insight, April 8, 4:00 PM

The world around us is not labelled or divided in categories, then why is academic content? Can we not relate topics and elaborate meaning on the basis of relationships and intertwined data? 

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The Tools of Change -- Campus Technology

The Tools of Change -- Campus Technology | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
For years, thought leaders in higher education have warned of disruptive change looming on the horizon. And with the advent of massive open online courses, or MOOCs, many proclaimed that the forces of change had come to a head. Now that students could access high-quality courses on any topic, any time, anywhere — for free — what need would they have for a traditional college education?

Via Peter Mellow
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