Inquiry-Based Lea...
Follow
Find
427 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Helen Teague from Connectivism
onto Inquiry-Based Learning and Research
Scoop.it!

Could Chomsky Be Wrong : Modularity , Connectivism and Language Acquisition

Could Chomsky Be Wrong : Modularity , Connectivism and Language Acquisition | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
This is a page of commented links to theories of language development and language structure that are non-Chomskyan...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

What Can Programmers and Writers Learn From One Another?

What Can Programmers and Writers Learn From One Another? | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Simple, elegant solutions work, no matter the discipline.
Helen Teague's insight:

"There are more similarities between coding and prose than meet the eye. “The interesting thing about writing code is you don’t really write code for the machine,” said Vikram Chandra, a professor of creative writing at UC Berkeley and author of “Geek Sublime,” on KQED’s Forum. “That’s almost an incidental byproduct. Who you really write code for is all the programmers in the future who will try to fix it, extend it and debug it."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

Rethinking the Emphasis on Standardized Testing

Rethinking the Emphasis on Standardized Testing | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Note: Today’s guest blog is from Robert Sun, chairman, president and CEO of Suntex International Inc. and inventor of First In Math, an online program designed for deep practice in mathematics. He i...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

5 Ways Mindfulness Changed My Life | Inspiration and Encouragement for Mindful Living

5 Ways Mindfulness Changed My Life | Inspiration and Encouragement for Mindful Living | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Helen Teague's insight:

from talented writer Crystal Belle

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Helen Teague from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | EDUcation CHANGE | Teaching by Topic

Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | EDUcation CHANGE | Teaching by Topic | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

For years, Finland has been the by-word for a successful education system, perched at the top of international league tables for literacy and numeracy.

Pasi Silander, the city’s development manager, explained: “What we need now is a different kind of education to prepare people for working life.

.

“Young people use quite advanced computers. In the past the banks had lots of  bank clerks totting up figures but now that has totally changed.

.

“We therefore have to make the changes in education that are necessary for industry and modern society.”

.

Subject-specific lessons – an hour of history in the morning, an hour of geography in the afternoon – are already being phased out for 16-year-olds in the city’s upper schools. They are being replaced by what the Finns call “phenomenon” teaching – or teaching by topic. For instance, a teenager studying a vocational course might take “cafeteria services” lessons, which would include elements of maths, languages (to help serve foreign customers), writing skills and communication skills.

.

More academic pupils would be taught cross-subject topics such as the European Union - which would merge elements of economics, history (of the countries involved), languages and geography.

.


Via Gust MEES
Helen Teague's insight:

I wonder if this would work in the U.S.? Also, in Finland, students do not take standardized tests until the end of high school (Zhao, 2012, p. 111), so thankfully, perhaps the drill and kill process is diminished.


*Zhao, Y. (2012). World Class Learners. 

more...
jmoreillon's curator insight, March 27, 9:42 AM

This is what school librarians have been doing forever!

María Florencia Perrone's curator insight, April 8, 4:00 PM

The world around us is not labelled or divided in categories, then why is academic content? Can we not relate topics and elaborate meaning on the basis of relationships and intertwined data? 

Alejandra Martín Delgado's curator insight, April 21, 7:12 PM

This scoop is particularly useful for those of you attending Grade 6 who have to deal with the topic of the educational system. Here you can find some inspiration t develop your speech.

Rescooped by Helen Teague from Learning with MOOCs
Scoop.it!

The Tools of Change -- Campus Technology

The Tools of Change -- Campus Technology | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
For years, thought leaders in higher education have warned of disruptive change looming on the horizon. And with the advent of massive open online courses, or MOOCs, many proclaimed that the forces of change had come to a head. Now that students could access high-quality courses on any topic, any time, anywhere — for free — what need would they have for a traditional college education?

Via Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

10 Ways to Increase Student Engagement Online

10 Ways to Increase Student Engagement Online | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
If you're teaching an online class and are trying to increase student engagement, then this article is for your. We'll cover 10 things to help you do just that.
Helen Teague's insight:

http://facultyworkshop.com/increasestudentengagement/

New videoconferencing feature in Firefox called "Hello"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

The Benefits of Immersive Learning | Origin Learning – A Learning Solutions Blog

The Benefits of Immersive Learning | Origin Learning – A Learning Solutions Blog | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Helen Teague's insight:

"immersive learning environments are those that use virtual/ augmented reality to mimic real-life situations"

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Helen Teague from Educational Technology News
Scoop.it!

Robert Gagne’s Nine Steps of Instruction: Do’s and Don’ts in E-Learning

Robert Gagne’s Nine Steps of Instruction: Do’s and Don’ts in E-Learning | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

"In 1985, American educational psychologist Robert Gagne created a nine-step process of instructional design which can guide the process of learning. The process is called ‘The Events of Instruction’ where in each event has a definite purpose of supporting learning and leads to definite outcomes.


Gagne’s model can serve as guidelines to creating a result-oriented e-learning instructional design for workplace training too. Below are the Nine Events of Instruction and the Do’s and Don’ts that must be kept in mind:"


Via EDTC@UTB
more...
Nancy Barnett's curator insight, March 12, 12:23 PM

This is a good model to use as a guideline if your are creating a e-learning course.

Helen Teague's curator insight, March 31, 9:08 AM

Robert Gagne’s Nine Steps of Instruction-guidelines to creating a result-oriented e-learning instructional design

Step 1:  Gain Attention
Step 2: Provide a Learning Objective
Step 3: Stimulate Recall of Prior Learning/Knowledge

Step 4: Present the information

Step 5: Provide Guidance for Learning

Step 6: Elicit Performance

Step 7: Provide Feedback

Step 8: Assess Performance

Step 9: Enhance Retention and Transfer

Jean Marrapodi's curator insight, April 1, 8:10 PM

Love Gagne!

Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

Effective Branching Scenarios In eLearning: 5 Tips For eLearning Professionals - eLearning Industry

Effective Branching Scenarios In eLearning: 5 Tips For eLearning Professionals - eLearning Industry | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
How To Create Effective Branching Scenarios In eLearning. Check 5 Tips To Create Effective Branching Scenarios In eLearning for eLearning Professionals.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

The Adult Learning Theory - Andragogy - of Malcolm Knowles - eLearning Industry

The Adult Learning Theory - Andragogy - of Malcolm Knowles - eLearning Industry | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Are you interested in Adult Learning Theory? Check the The Adult Learning Theory - Andragogy - of Malcolm Knowles to find out more.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Helen Teague from Educational Technology News
Scoop.it!

Writing For Online Learners And Readers

Writing For Online Learners And Readers | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

"More and more educators are doing more than simply teaching in the 21st century. Technology has expanded and changed our role. You may already be in this position, either by chance or not. Are you an educator who is new to the job of writing eLearning resources? I was. Here is what I’ve learned."


Via EDTC@UTB
more...
Tanyam's curator insight, March 4, 6:08 PM

Its been a while since my collegues and i did our "Writing for the Web".  Here are some reminders, or if you are a newbie, some tips, on writing for online learning

Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

How To Cite Social Media In Scholarly Writing

How To Cite Social Media In Scholarly Writing | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
How To Cite Social Media In Scholarly Writing
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Helen Teague from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Socratic Method Research Portal

Socratic Method Research Portal | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
The Socratic Method Research Portal is the product of over 30 years of research and experimentation with the Socratic method.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

29 Quotes that Explain How to Become a Better Writer

29 Quotes that Explain How to Become a Better Writer | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
The best way to become a better writer is to write, but it doesn't hurt to get advice from the best. Here are 29 tips and pieces of wisdom from top writers.
Helen Teague's insight:

one quote for most days of the month!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

How to write a good abstract? — PhD blog * great content in Dunglish for PhD's

How to write a good abstract? — PhD blog * great content in Dunglish for PhD's | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
There are different types of abstracts, those for articles, and those for papers for a conference, congress or symposium The abstract for a paper has
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Helen Teague from Learning & Mind & Brain
Scoop.it!

Exploding Classrooms

Exploding Classrooms | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

The ideas within Connectivism blow my mind in many good ways. I hear the words of U2’s “Where the Streets Have No Name”–I want to tear down the walls that hold me inside. I want to reach out and touch the flame.

Beginning with Siemens 2004 explanation these ideas seriously shake up traditional notions of classrooms and teachers:

Principles of Connectivism:

- Learning and knowledge rests in diversity of opinions.
- Learning is a process of connecting specialized nodes or information sources.
- Learning may reside in non-human appliances.
- Capacity to know more is more critical than what is currently known
- Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning.
- Ability to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a core skill.
- Currency (accurate, up-to-date knowledge) is the intent of all connectivist learning activities.
- Decision-making is itself a learning process. Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality. While there is a right answer now, it may be wrong tomorrow due to alterations in the information climate affecting the decision.

I love the idea that the learner must be the central agent in learning, that education happens always and everywhere, that learners need to make and maintain connections, and that learners need to make sense of constantly flowing streams of information.

And when I look at the slide below produced by Rick Schwier, it essentially shows my entire educational career from a student starting grade 1 in 1975 up to my teaching today. It delineates the process in which I have learned and tried to help others learn during massive changes in availability and production of information. So the question I (and all teachers) should be asking ourselves is how the “Social software + free and open content” in the most recent iteration bubble impacts the way education is happening under our guidance.


Via Miloš Bajčetić
Helen Teague's insight:

Principles of Connectivism:
- Learning and knowledge rests in diversity of opinions.
- Learning is a process of connecting specialized nodes or information sources.
- Learning may reside in non-human appliances.
- Capacity to know more is more critical than what is currently known
- Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning.
- Ability to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a core skill.
- Currency (accurate, up-to-date knowledge) is the intent of all connectivist learning activities.
- Decision-making is itself a learning process. Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality. While there is a right answer now, it may be wrong tomorrow due to alterations in the information climate affecting the decision.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

Editwright: 4 Steps to Spark Your Creativity

Editwright: 4 Steps to Spark Your Creativity | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Simple tricks for writers who need a little inspiration.
Helen Teague's insight:

Do you have a writing ritual? What is it?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Helen Teague from Learning & Mind & Brain
Scoop.it!

'Over testing risks squeezing out creative skills in pupils'

'Over testing risks squeezing out creative skills in pupils' | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Of course STEM subjects are vital, but the pendulum has swung too far in favour of a curriculum that undervalues creativity and critical thinking, says Vikas Pota

Via Miloš Bajčetić
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Helen Teague from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Personalize Learning: Learning can and should be Natural and Engaging | Learning by Doing

Personalize Learning: Learning can and should be Natural and Engaging | Learning by Doing | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

Apply New Learning Often and in Meaningful Contexts 
The more you can apply what you're learning to your every day, the more it'll stick in your head. The reason is simple. When you're learning by doing, you're implementing everything that makes our memory work. When you're able to connect what you're learning with a real world task, that forms the bonds in your brain, and subsequently the skills you're learning will stick around. 

.

We learn best when we have context, and that applies to new skills as much as it does random facts in school. That's why something like the transfer of learning is helpful when you’re learning a new skill. This means you're applying your new skills in your day to day life in a context that matters. (http://lifehacker.com/the-science-behind-how-we-learn-new-skills-908488422)

.

Learn more:

.

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/10/03/design-the-learning-of-your-learners-students-ideas/

.


Via Gust MEES
more...
Karen B Wehner's curator insight, April 8, 11:18 AM

Not much that hasn't been said before, but it's all worth repeating. 

Inma Contreras's curator insight, April 14, 7:34 AM

The best way to learn,in my opinion. Learning by doing including emotions:perfection.

Jake Goulet's curator insight, April 15, 11:40 AM

Learn the ways of learning and make your life easier!

Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

4 Ways to Apply the Situated Learning Theory | Origin Learning – A Learning Solutions Blog

4 Ways to Apply the Situated Learning Theory | Origin Learning – A Learning Solutions Blog | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Helen Teague's insight:

excellent review of situated learning

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

5 Tips To Find Your Narrative Voice For Your eLearning Course - eLearning Industry

5 Tips To Find Your Narrative Voice For Your eLearning Course - eLearning Industry | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
How to Find Your Narrative Voice For Your eLearning Course. Check the 5 Tips To Find Your Narrative Voice For Your eLearning Course.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

7 eLearning Script Writing Tips To Perfect Your eLearning Course Narrative - eLearning Industry

7 eLearning Script Writing Tips To Perfect Your eLearning Course Narrative - eLearning Industry | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Wondering how to perfect your eLearning course narrative? Check the article 7 eLearning Script Writing Tips To Perfect Your eLearning Course Narrative
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

Non-Linear eLearning Design: 6 Common Misconceptions Instructional Designers Should Know - eLearning Industry

Non-Linear eLearning Design: 6 Common Misconceptions Instructional Designers Should Know - eLearning Industry | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Wondering about Non-Linear eLearning Design? Check 6 Common Non-Linear eLearning Design Misconceptions Instructional Designers Should Know
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

5 Easy Ways to Share E-Learning Courses

5 Easy Ways to Share E-Learning Courses | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Here are five ways to share e-learning courses without a lot of hassle and they don't require an LMS or other costly system.
Helen Teague's insight:

Excellent ideas here

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Helen Teague
Scoop.it!

When They Read But Don't Understand

When They Read But Don't Understand | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
When They Read But Don't Understand
Helen Teague's insight:

post from Grant Wiggins

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Helen Teague from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

Ten Reflective Questions to Ask at the End of Class - Brilliant or Insane

Ten Reflective Questions to Ask at the End of Class - Brilliant or Insane | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
How deep is your commitment to reflective practice?

Do you maintain a reflective journal? Do you blog? Do you capture and archive your reflections in a different space?

Do you consistently reserve a bit of time for your own reflective work? Do you help the learners you serve do the same?

I began creating dedicated time and space for reflection toward the end of my classroom teaching career, and the practice has followed me through my work at the WNY Young Writer’s Studio. I’ve found that it can take very little time and yet, the return on our investment has always been significant.

Via John Evans
more...
Darrington Lee's curator insight, March 7, 9:36 PM

I feel that it is generally important to reflect on one self after taking a lesson, this ensures we are learning on the right track and doesn't "fall off" the topic. Reflection keep us calm and collected, so we can stand back straight up even after a failure to accomplish something. This gives us a never ending space to improve and beyond than just learning, but also to persevere, take responsibility in one's learning and also to excel in things we do.

Sue Alexander's curator insight, March 9, 1:54 PM

Reflection...don't leave class without it!

Ann-Lois Edström's curator insight, March 10, 12:52 PM

Att reflektera över sin undervisning och hjälpa eleverna att också göra det. Jättebra frågor!