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The 8 Key Elements Of Digital Literacy

The 8 Key Elements Of Digital Literacy | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
Many teachers have added ‘digital literacy’ as number four on the list of literacies their students should have (or be working towards, in most cases). Reading, writing, and math are now followed by digital literacy. Obviously, depending on the grade level  you teach, your students will have different abilities in each of the four areas, …

 

BUT, as WE are using "Technology", let us ALSO learn about the basics of "Cyber Security", a MUST in a connected technology driven world:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/10/27/cyber-security-is-easy-get-the-right-reflexes/

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 24, 12:14 PM

The 8 Key Elements Of Digital Literacy...


Michael Millard's curator insight, May 25, 1:56 PM

Klurigt för oss svenskar men ack så clever.

Ajo Monzó's curator insight, May 27, 2:08 AM

Yes!!!!

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The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy

The Maker Movement and the Rebirth of Constructionism - Hybrid Pedagogy | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
The culmination of my quest for more powerful learning grounded in theory and research came when recently I conducted an experiment in pushing constructionism into the digital age.

 

Constructionism is based on two types of construction. First, it asserts that learning is an active process, in which people actively construct knowledge from their experience in the world. People don’t get ideas; they make them. This aspect of construction comes from the constructivist theory of knowledge development by Jean Piaget. To Piaget’s concept, Papert added another type of construction, arguing that people construct new knowledge with particular effectiveness when they are engaged in constructing personally meaningful products.

Imagine my surprise and joy when I realized that I had arrived at constructionism prior to knowing that such a theory even existed. I believe that thousands of other educators are unknowingly working within the constructionist paradigm as well. Although many within the Maker movement are aware that it has it’s roots in constructionism, the movement is gaining impressive momentum without the majority of Makers realizing that there is a strong theoretical foundation behind their work.

 

After I came to understand this connection between my practices and the supporting theoretical framework I was better able to focus and refine my practice. Even more importantly, I felt more confident and powerful in forging ahead with further experiments in the learning situations I design for my learners.

 


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Marco Pozzi's curator insight, February 23, 11:27 AM

Molto interessante!!

Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, February 23, 11:10 PM

from hybridpedagogy.com a new online journal. 

Leah Lesley Christensen's curator insight, February 28, 2:20 AM

Yes, I agree !

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Why Learning Through Social Networks Is The Future

Why Learning Through Social Networks Is The Future | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

Students Need Professional Learning Networks, Too

Learning to create, manage and promote a professional learning network (PLN) will soon become, if it’s not already, one of the most necessary and sought after skills for a global citizen, and as such, must become a prominent feature of any school curriculum.

 


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Ali Anani's curator insight, December 2, 2013 12:52 AM

The emergence of social networks impact is well-explained in this post.

Amanda Feliu's curator insight, December 2, 2013 4:55 AM

Un article molt interessant que parla sobre que els estudiants necessiten aprendre des de xarxes socials professionals.

Kim Flintoff's curator insight, July 8, 1:27 AM

Collaboration can be both a formal structure for learning activity but also an underpinning framework for engagement and fostering life-long learning.  Learning networks are part the new learning ecosystem and should be recognised and supported.

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Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’

Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’ | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
The famed psychologist explains why one is not the other though they are often confused.

 

1.       Individualize your teaching as much as possible. Instead of “one size fits all,” learn as much as you can about each student, and teach each person in ways that they find comfortable and learn effectively. Of course this is easier to accomplish with smaller classes. But ‘apps’ make it possible to individualize for everyone.

 

Read more, a MUST!!!

 

...

 


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Linda Guthrie's curator insight, October 18, 2013 9:06 AM

Howard Gardner asks teachers to Drop the term “styles.” It will confuse others and it won’t help either you or your students.

Shafali Anand's comment, October 25, 2013 6:09 AM
Of course they aren't. They are the raw material that come together and result in learning styles. I've got to read this :)
Shafali Anand's comment, October 25, 2013 6:18 AM
Read it. I've always found Gardner's MI theory interesting - because it's a great equalizer - when I was growing up logical-mathematical intelligence (in Gardner's terminology) was given the highest importance - art, music, sports etc. were considered talents/gifts - and not intelligences. Gardner made them more respectable by calling them intelligences. This is why I too can call myself intelligent today - visually and spatially intelligent. Ahem!
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What's In and What's Out in Education

What's In and What's Out in Education | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it

I really like what's in and what's out of current trends.  I created the following chart of what I hope and wish would be education ins and outs in the NEAR future.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

 

 


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Odile Dupont's curator insight, May 6, 3:19 AM

Des idées évidentes mais sans doute pas encore pour tout le monde !

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 6, 12:55 PM

Relationships are at the centre of education. It is no longer teacher-centred or learner-centred. In a sense, teachers and students are learning alongside each other. I am not sure it will always be the teacher leading the way although they have to be willing to know when to let go and when to take charge. Content is still incredibly important in that unless it connects to the lives of teachers and students it is not practical and meaningful. Technology is rarely seamlessly integrated.

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Engaging with Ebooks Can Aid Children’s Literacy, Study Finds

Engaging with Ebooks Can Aid Children’s Literacy, Study Finds | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
As younger and younger children recognize and use electronic devices as sources of information and entertainment, what is the impact on their literacy skills? Largely a positive one, according to a study in the January edition of SAGE Open.

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Ness Crouch's curator insight, January 17, 8:29 PM

Nice to see some research on this. :)

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, January 21, 11:20 AM

Alfabetización digital en los niños pequeños.

Annie M Herbert's curator insight, February 7, 5:04 PM

So as this generation of students comes up through school, we will really have to adjust the way they receive information.  We cannot stay stagnant.  We'll lose every student out there.  And I wouldn't blame them.

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Do You have the Personality To Be an Inquiry-Based Teacher?

Do You have the Personality To Be an Inquiry-Based Teacher? | Inquiry-Based Learning and Research | Scoop.it
If an inquiry-based system is to succeed, we’ll need really good human beings in the classroom who know their field, but who also radiate the kind of positive, non-judgmental love that helps students open their minds and hearts.

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L R Everitt's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:30 PM

I absolutely agree with this premise: students need to feel the classroom is a safe place to take risks and even make mistakes, all in the interest of learning.  That sense of security comes from agreeing build a positive learning environment, which is a loving place to be.  Students, as well as teachers, have a lot of power to make or break such an agreement, so modeling this behavior and teaching students how to build mutual trust and respect is worth a small loss in academic instruction time at the beginning of the course.

The Rice Process's curator insight, November 25, 2013 4:13 PM

Interesting!

Ness Crouch's curator insight, January 14, 4:22 PM

It's important to know if you have what it takes and to know what you might need to work on to become a better inquiry based teacher. A MUST read!!