Chasing the Future
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Chasing the Future
information related to new technologies & innovation, developments in science and space exploration
Curated by Sílvia Dias
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Say Hello to the Robotic Personal Assistant of Your Dreams

Say Hello to the Robotic Personal Assistant of Your Dreams | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Born from MIT's Media Lab, 'Jibo' can take photos, remind you of important dates and events and, more importantly, interact with you and learn about you.

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Construction begins on largest carbon capture project for an existing coal plant to date

Construction begins on largest carbon capture project for an existing coal plant to date | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
The U.S. Department of Energy along with NRG Energy and JX Nippon, has announced that construction has begun on a post-combustion carbon capture project in Texas. The project will seek to capture approximately 90 percent of carbon dioxide emissions from a coal fired power plant, preventing it from being ...
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These 16 X-rays of toys are surprisingly awesome | News | Geek.com

These 16 X-rays of toys are surprisingly awesome | News | Geek.com | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Perhaps you’ve spent time wondering about the inner workings of some project of modern manufacturing — maybe something as simple as a toy. Although, how many of us have the time or inclination [...]
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En bref : des lentilles de Google pourraient mesurer la glycémie

En bref : des lentilles de Google pourraient mesurer la glycémie | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Mesurer la glycémie chez une personne diabétique ou corriger la presbytie : ce sont les deux applications potentielles de futures lentilles de contact qui résulteraient d'un accord entre une filiale du groupe pharmaceutique suisse Novartis et...

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Strand Craft V8 Wet Rod - Grease n Gasoline

Strand Craft V8 Wet Rod - Grease n Gasoline | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Strand Craft V8 Wet Rod
Strand Craft V8 Wet Rod a 16-foot boat | luxury Jet Ski which has a customizable construction fabricated from carbon fiber. Strand Craft Wet Rod is powered by 5.7-liter V8 Engine which produces 300 horsepower. Strand Craft V8 Wet Rod can do a top-speed of 65 mph. Strand Craft V8 Wet Rod price is to be announced by the builders yet.

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Grease N Gasoline's curator insight, July 19, 2014 1:31 PM

Strand Craft V8 Wet Rod, V8, Jet Ski, yacht, Boat, www.wayspeed.com

Chet Hayes's curator insight, July 26, 2014 8:43 AM

Visit our new site http://www.muscleboatsofamerica.com #muscleboats

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New material puts a twist in light

New material puts a twist in light | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Scientists at The Australian National University (ANU) have uncovered the secret to twisting light at will. It is the latest step in the development of photonics, the faster, more compact and less carbon-hungry successor to electronics.
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Supercomputers reveal strange, stress-induced transformations in world's thinnest materials

Supercomputers reveal strange, stress-induced transformations in world's thinnest materials | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Interested in an ultra-fast, unbreakable, and flexible smart phone that recharges in a matter of seconds? Monolayer materials may make it possible. These atom-thin sheets—including the famed super material graphene—feature exceptional and untapped mechanical and electronic properties. ...
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Les réseaux 3G et 4G autorisés dans les avions - FrAndroid

Les réseaux 3G et 4G autorisés dans les avions - FrAndroid | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Au mois de mars, l'ARCEP avait lancé une consultation publique pour autorise l'utilisation des réseaux 3G et 4G au sein des avions. La consultation a pris

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What Would It Take to Stop AIDS by 2030?

What Would It Take to Stop AIDS by 2030? | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
The United Nations announced today that the global HIV/AIDS epidemic could be slowed to a trickle within the next two decades. Can it be done?

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New material can lead to “squishy robots”

New material can lead to “squishy robots” | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Researchers have developed a material that may lead to robots that can squeeze their way through almost anything. 

Via S. Diez de Medina
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Penda’s Low-Impact Modular Bamboo Hotel Reconnects Visitors with Nature

Penda’s Low-Impact Modular Bamboo Hotel Reconnects Visitors with Nature | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Penda acaba de lançar "Um com os pássaros", um conceito de design para um hotel estrutura flexível que pode ser facilmente construído e ampliado com impacto zero sobre a paisagem.
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adicionar a sua visão ...

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'Take your clothes off, be like me!' says wise-cracking robot

'Take your clothes off, be like me!' says wise-cracking robot | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
A wise-cracking humanoid robot called Pepper, whose makers claim can read people's emotions, was unveiled in Tokyo last month.
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Harvesting energy from humidity: Free, green energy from leaping water droplets

Harvesting energy from humidity: Free, green energy from leaping water droplets | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
The study of a super-hydrophobic surface has led to discovery of a method for generating power from condensation. Condensing water droplets literally leap off the surface and produce an electric charge that can be harvested.

Via Digital Sustainability, Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Digital Sustainability's curator insight, July 15, 2014 10:57 AM

It’s time to get rid of that dehumidifier — you are just throwing awayfree energy by sucking all the moisture out of the air, according to some new research published by a team from MIT. Postdoc researchers Nenad Miljkovic and engineering professor Evelyn Wang figured out last year that water droplets jumping off a hydrophobic surface could gain an electric charge, but now they’re worked out how to capture that energy, essentially pulling power out of thin air.

The team happened upon this mechanism quite by accident. The goal when the leaping water was discovered was to design a more efficient heat transfer material for power plants. That’s not nearly as sexy as conjuring power from humidity, but Miljkovic and Wang noticed something odd when working with a super-hydrophobic surface (pictured above). The condensing water droplets sometimes spontaneously jumped away from the hydrophobic surface, which was the goal as it cools much more efficiently. They didn’t expect the water droplets to produce an electric charge in the process, and that may have significant ramifications.

It’s the natural tendency of water to flow away from a hydrophobic surface, but in turning the leaping water into a viable method of power generation, the researchers had to give it somewhere to go. To encourage the water droplets to take a leap, a hydrophilic surface was placed just above the hydrophobic one. So the water really wants to make the trip from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, and it brings a few electrons along for the ride. The charge difference between the two plates can then be used to provide power.

Marcelo Errera's curator insight, January 22, 7:46 AM

New frontiers are found as we deepen our understanding of natural systems.

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You don’t need drugs to be tripped out by this unique timelapse of great American cities

You don’t need drugs to be tripped out by this unique timelapse of great American cities | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Although they'd help.

Via Laura Brown
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LED tech being developed to grow food on Mars | Science! | Geek.com

LED tech being developed to grow food on Mars | Science! | Geek.com | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
We will face considerable technological hurdles designing any sort of manned mission to Mars and beyond, but simply building a ship that can convey astronauts to the outer solar system is only one [...]
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A 15-Year-Old is Developing a 3D Printer That’s 10 Times Faster Than Anything on the Market!

A 15-Year-Old is Developing a 3D Printer That’s 10 Times Faster Than Anything on the Market! | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Thomas Suarez says he has developed a 3D printer ten times faster than anything on the market.
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Japanese Designers Create a Huge Delta 3D Printer – 4 Meters Tall

Japanese Designers Create a Huge Delta 3D Printer – 4 Meters Tall | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
  Recently we have been seeing a lot of innovative 3D printing technology coming out of Asia. The Chinese have been at the forefront of developing a

Via Jinbuhm Kim, Manuel Mühlbauer, Hassan Raza Balti, arslog
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Next Generation Membrane Pacemakers Wrap the Heart Like an Electronic Glove

Next Generation Membrane Pacemakers Wrap the Heart Like an Electronic Glove | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
University scientists develop a membrane that keeps your heart pumping better and prevents heart attacks.
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UNT Researchers Create C-lignin (Plant) Based Stronger Carbon Fiber - BioNews Texas

UNT Researchers Create C-lignin (Plant) Based Stronger Carbon Fiber - BioNews Texas | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
UNT Researchers Create C-lignin (Plant) Based Stronger Carbon Fiber BioNews Texas UNT reports that the new carbon fiber is projected to replace common petroleum and coal-based carbon fiber materials in a wide range of goods, including parts for...

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A cheaper way to make hydrogen fuel - Futurity

A cheaper way to make hydrogen fuel - Futurity | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Scientists say they've identified a more efficient and less expensive way to make hydrogen fuel. But sustainable electricity still is in front.  JB


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Joel Barker's curator insight, July 17, 2014 1:03 PM

Hydrogen fuel advocates keep picking away at its weaknesses. Easier to make via this catalyst is a good step forward. But I still see 

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Google Strikes Smart Contact Lens deal to track Diabetes and Cure Farsightedness

Google Strikes Smart Contact Lens deal to track Diabetes and Cure Farsightedness | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
With Glass and Android Wear, Google has already invested a lot of time and resources into developing the next-generation of wearables, but it's another of its eye-focused projects that has today received its first major boost.

Via TechinBiz, Farid Mheir
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Pier Bécotte's curator insight, July 16, 2014 9:31 AM

Google frappe intelligente lentilles de contact accord pour suivre le diabète et fixer l'hypermétropie

Farid Mheir's curator insight, July 17, 2014 1:44 PM

Strangely I never wrote about this but it certainly is worth a mention because Google has now made very strong moves towards "atoms and not bits" as Sergei Brin put it a few days ago, stating that Google has invested in search (bits) for a long time and is now complementing its focus to physical devices (atoms) such as the self driving car or here the contact lens.


This story is of particular importance as it shows that Google is not in the business of making contact lenses (or cars) but providing the R&D to disrupt industries that are not making the radical shifts they can by using digital technology.


Also consider:.

[INFOGRAPHIC] The Existing Wearable Technology Landscape via @WearableWorld http://sco.lt/7pTHPN

IV Technology's curator insight, July 18, 2014 11:18 AM

siguiente paso es hacer diagnosticos con scaner y que se prenda una luz roja para que vayamos al servicio.... Hospital

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The Human Brain’s Remarkably Low Power Consumption, and How Computers Might Mimic its Efficiency

The Human Brain’s Remarkably Low Power Consumption, and How Computers Might Mimic its Efficiency | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
A new paper discusses the efficiency of neuronal computing and the ways in which we might better model the brain's function in future hardware. In some significant ways, we're clearly on the right track already.

Via Miguel Prazeres
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How the U.K. plans to take tourists into space by the end of the decade

How the U.K. plans to take tourists into space by the end of the decade | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Seeking to lead the commercial transformation of Europe's space industry, Britain is moving ahead with plans for zero-gravity tourists flights, shielded from the bickering and budget uncertainties.

Via Official AndreasCY
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Official AndreasCY's curator insight, July 17, 2014 6:32 AM

A potential design for the U.K.'s first commercial space port, due for completion in 2018.

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One injection stops type 2 diabetes in its tracks in mice without side effects

One injection stops type 2 diabetes in its tracks in mice without side effects | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
In mice with diet-induced diabetes—the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans—a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days. The discovery by Salk scientists, published today in the journal Nature, could lead to a new generation ...
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The Brain Is Not Computable: Why Singularity Will Not Happen and Humans Will Assimilate Machines

The Brain Is Not Computable: Why Singularity Will Not Happen and Humans Will Assimilate Machines | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
A leading neuroscientist says Kurzweil’s Singularity isn’t going to happen. Instead, humans will assimilate machines.

 

Miguel Nicolelis, a top neuroscientist at Duke University, says computers will never replicate the human brain and that the technological Singularity is “a bunch of hot air.”

 

“The brain is not computable and no engineering can reproduce it,” says Nicolelis, author of several pioneering papers on brain-machine interfaces.

 

The Singularity, of course, is that moment when a computer super-intelligence emerges and changes the world in ways beyond our comprehension.

 

Among the idea’s promoters are futurist Ray Kurzweil, recently hired on at Google as a director of engineering, who has been predicting that not only will machine intelligence exceed our own, but people will be able to download their thoughts and memories into computers (see “Ray Kurzweil Plans to Create a Mind at Google—and Have It Serve You”). 

 

Nicolelis calls that idea sheer bunk. “Downloads will never happen,” he said during remarks made at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston on Sunday. “There are a lot of people selling the idea that you can mimic the brain with a computer.”

 

The debate over whether the brain is a kind of computer has been running for decades. Many scientists think it’s possible, in theory, for a computer to equal the brain given sufficient computer power and an understanding of how the brain works.

 

Kurzweil delves into the idea of “reverse-engineering” the brain in his latest book, How to Create a Mind: The Secret of Human Thought Revealed, in which he says even though the brain may be immensely complex, “the fact that it contains many billions of cells and trillions of connections does not necessarily make its primary method complex.”

 

But Nicolelis is in a camp that thinks that human consciousness (and if you believe in it, the soul) simply can’t be replicated in silicon. That’s because its most important features are the result of unpredictable, nonlinear interactions among billions of cells, Nicolelis says.

 

“You can’t predict whether the stock market will go up or down because you can’t compute it,” he says. “You could have all the computer chips ever in the world and you won’t create a consciousness.”

 

The neuroscientist, originally from Brazil, instead thinks that humans will increasingly subsume machines (an idea, incidentally, that’s also part of Kurzweil’s predictions).

 

In a study published last week, for instance, Nicolelis’s group at Duke used brain implants to allow mice to sense infrared light, something mammals can’t normally perceive. They did it by wiring a head-mounted infrared sensor to electrodes implanted into a part of the brain called the somatosensory cortex.

 

The experiment, in which several mice were able to follow sensory cues from the infrared detector to obtain a reward, was the first ever to use a neural implant to add a new sense to an animal, Nicolelis says.  


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Bernhard H. Schmitz's comment, July 16, 2014 2:33 PM
I agree that too many people think it would be sufficient to plug a bunch of neurons together and consciousness will happen. Ridiculous. But I am convinced that it is not necessary to simulate a brain or reverse engineer it. Brains are developed by random incidents and evolution - and it's a mess. I am strongly convinced that a conscious mechanism will be developed from scratch. And it will outwit us.
Bernhard H. Schmitz's curator insight, July 16, 2014 2:37 PM

I agree that too many people think it would be sufficient to plug a bunch of neurons together and consciousness will happen. Ridiculous. But I am convinced that it is not necessary to simulate a brain or reverse engineer it. Brains are developed by random incidents and evolution - and it's a mess. I am strongly convinced that a conscious mechanism will be developed from scratch. And it will outwit us.

Marco Bertolini's comment, July 17, 2014 2:52 AM
@ Bernard Schmitz : I think you have a point there and I like the verty elegant way you put it : a conscious mecanism coming out from the chaos.