Chasing the Future
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Chasing the Future
information related to new technologies & innovation, developments in science and space exploration
Curated by Sílvia Dias
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33rd Square | Futuristic Tube Transport System Looks To Speed Passengers Around The Globe

33rd Square | Futuristic Tube Transport System Looks To Speed Passengers Around The Globe | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
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A Nissan Juke on Tank Treads Is as Glorious and Ridiculous as You'd Imagine | WIRED

A Nissan Juke on Tank Treads Is as Glorious and Ridiculous as You'd Imagine | WIRED | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Built as a support vehicle for an ice-driving academy in Lapland, Finland, the Nissan Juke Nismo "RSnow" looks perfect for chasing down Yetis.
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6 designs that could save your life

6 designs that could save your life | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Engineers, designers, and hackers around the world are harnessing cutting-edge developments in material science, biotechnology, and robotics to roll out new designs that save lives
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Stem Cells Could Treat Hair Loss : DNews

Stem Cells Could Treat Hair Loss : DNews | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Using genetic techniques, scientists coaxed stem cells to grown into cells that regulate the formation and growth cycle of hair follicles.
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Does AI really threaten the future of the human race?

Does AI really threaten the future of the human race? | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Stephen Hawking says that the development of artificial intelligence threatens the future of humanity - what do computer scientists say about the danger?

Via Maurizio [ITA]
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AP's 'robot journalists' are writing their own stories now

Minutes after Apple released its record-breaking quarterly earnings this week, the Associated Press published (by way of CNBC, Yahoo, and others) "Apple tops Street 1Q forecasts." It's a story...

Via Maurizio [ITA]
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Les antibiotiques, nouvelle arme contre le cancer : la découverte britannique qui pourrait tout changer

Les antibiotiques, nouvelle arme contre le cancer : la découverte britannique qui pourrait tout changer | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Un chercheur scientifique américain à lancé de nouvelles études concernant le traitement du cancer par les antibiotiques. Les résultats pourraient être encourageants.

Via L'Info Autrement
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Building Robots With Better Morals Than Humans - The Atlantic

Building Robots With Better Morals Than Humans - The Atlantic | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Bill Gates says he's concerned about the decisions machines of the near future will make once they outsmart humans.

Via Ben van Lier
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Plant Power: Dutch company harvests electricity from living plants to power streetlights, Wi-Fi, and cell phones

Plant Power: Dutch company harvests electricity from living plants to power streetlights, Wi-Fi, and cell phones | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Dutch company Plant-e harnesses electricity from living plants to power streetlights, cell phone chargers, and more.
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Without Technology, You'd be Dead in Days

Without Technology, You'd be Dead in Days | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
How humans evolved with technology, and why we would be extinct without it.
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If You Upload Your Mind to a Computer—Are You Still You?

If You Upload Your Mind to a Computer—Are You Still You? | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
One of the most mind-bending far future predictions you'll hear from some futurists is this: Eventually, the technology will exist to copy your
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14 Sensor Innovations Driving Digital Health

14 Sensor Innovations Driving Digital Health | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Amazing innovative sensors that are creating new and exciting ways to monitor health and wellbeing.

Via TechinBiz, Richard Platt
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Richard Platt's curator insight, January 27, 3:13 AM

A lot of wearable technology applications for health care, very interesting

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Global ENIGMA consortium cracks brain’s genetic codes for aging | KurzweilAI

Global ENIGMA consortium cracks brain’s genetic codes for aging | KurzweilAI | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
(Credit: ENIGMA) In the largest collaborative study of the brain to date, about 300 researchers in a global consortium of 190 institutions identified eight
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A Smart Office Desk That Tells You When It's Time to Stand | WIRED

A Smart Office Desk That Tells You When It's Time to Stand | WIRED | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
The Stir Kinetic Desk M1 learns your routine, notifies you of the best times to sit and stand, and raises and lowers itself with its quiet motorized legs.
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Um, this 8-year-old girl maybe discovered a cure for cancer

Um, this 8-year-old girl maybe discovered a cure for cancer | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Next time you want to know something, you might consider asking the nearest kid, especially if that kid is 8-year-old Camilla Lisanti. After a long hard day in the cancer research lab, Camilla’s scientist parents were making a little small talk at the dinner table when they turned to their daughter to get her opinion on strategies for curing the deadly disease. Probably expecting some kid-like answer, what they got instead might be the greatest theory of all time, much less in her short life. That’s right, an 8-year-old little girl just might have the answer to unlocking the cure for cancer. Professor Michael Lisanti, Camilla’s dad, told The Daily Mail, “She has heard us talk about cancer a lot and we thought it would be fun to ask her what she thought about cancer therapy. We asked her how she would cure cancer and she said ‘Mum and Dad, I would just use an antibiotic, like when I have a sore throat.” Instead of dismissing her outright, Michael ...
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Nanowire clothing could keep people warm

Nanowire clothing could keep people warm | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Nanowerk is the leading nanotechnology portal, committed to educate, inform and inspire about nanotechnologies, nanosciences, and other emerging technologies
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How Sequencing Foods' DNA Could Help Us Prevent Diseases | WIRED

How Sequencing Foods' DNA Could Help Us Prevent Diseases | WIRED | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Scientists from the IBM Research and Mars Incorporated today announced the Sequencing the Food Supply Chain Consortium, a collaborative food safety platform aiming to leverage advances in genomics and analytics to further our understanding of what makes food safe.
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DNA-based memory can record multiple inputs from engineered gene circuits

DNA-based memory can record multiple inputs from engineered gene circuits | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

A new DNA-based recorder allows bioengineers to create cell cultures that detect information in their environment and store it for later use. Such 'designer' cells might in the future be used to monitor water quality in a village, or measure the amount of sugar a person eats. The technique is described this week in Science1.

 

In synthetic biology, genes are engineered to regulate each other's expression in such a way that they can perform logic operations similar to those in computer circuits. Memory storage has long been considered one of the key components needed to fulfil the promise of this technology.

 

“Building gene circuits requires not only computation and logic, but a way to store that information,” says bioengineer Timothy Lu of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. “DNA provides a very stable form of memory and will allow us to do more complex computing tasks.”

 

In previous synthetic-biology attempts, data storage has been laborious to create. It also recorded only the presence or absence of one particular sensory input, and could be used only for limited applications. In the latest paper, Lu and his colleague Fahim Farzadfard describe how they can record many types of data simultaneously, and can register the accumulation of the input over time, like a car’s odometer counts kilometres. The stored information can then be read out by sequencing the DNA. They dub their method SCRIBE, for Synthetic Cellular Recorders Integrating Biological Events.

 

“It’s a nice addition to the toolbox”, which could complement other memory-storage techniques, says Jérôme Bonnet, a bioengineer at the Centre for Structural Biochemistry in Montpellier, France, who was not involved in the research. “There’s room for different types of memory in synthetic biology — as in computing you have the hard drive and the RAM.”

 

In a proof-of-concept experiment described in their latest paper, the team created a colony of Escherichia coli bacteria in which retrons responded to the presence of a chemical, flipping a switch in the E. coli genome that made it resistant to an antibiotic. This transformation did not happen to the same extent inside every E. coli cell in the colony, however. The higher the concentration of the triggering chemical, the greater was the proportion of cells that ended up antibiotic resistant.

 

Unlike previous methods that serve as a digital form of memory — turning on or off like a light switch — SCRIBE could work as an 'analog' form of memory that functions more like a dimmer switch. The memory is not contained in a single E. coli cell, but in the entire culture. “Distributing memory across this population becomes a powerful way of doing things.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Maurizio [ITA]
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Egloo heats your room without electricity for 10 cents a day

Egloo heats your room without electricity for 10 cents a day | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Egloo heats a room using a few candles and a terracotta dome for just 10 cents a day.
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VR and sensor tech will benefit patients of the future (Wired UK)

VR and sensor tech will benefit patients of the future (Wired UK) | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Imagine a future where you no longer need to go to a doctor's surgery. Where you use virtual reality to readapt to the outside world after a bad experience, or to empathise with someone else's illness.

By 2020 this could be possible. While the NHS buckles under budget cuts and stretched services, researchers at Cambridgeshire-based Plextek Consulting reckon that innovations in sensors and VR, could transform UK healthcare in the next five years.

Via Mau
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Panasonic’s new technology can purify water using sunlight

Panasonic’s new technology can purify water using sunlight | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
A new technology from panasonic could purify water using sunlight.
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Drone Captures Rare Footage of Dolphin Megapod Stampeding with Whales (Video)

Drone Captures Rare Footage of Dolphin Megapod Stampeding with Whales (Video) | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
What do you call dozens and dozens of dolphins, all leaping their way to new feeding grounds? Apparently, a megapod.
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It takes more than compliance to protect against cybercriminals

It takes more than compliance to protect against cybercriminals | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Cybercrime is on the rise in the health industry. Here’s how to stay ahead of it.

Via Roger Smith
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Ray Kurzweil's Mind-Boggling Predictions for the Next 25 Years

Ray Kurzweil's Mind-Boggling Predictions for the Next 25 Years | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
In my new book BOLD, one of the interviews that I’m most excited about is with my good friend Ray Kurzweil.

Bill Gates calls Ray, “the best

Via Carol Mei-Lan Morikawa
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Carol Mei-Lan Morikawa's curator insight, January 27, 3:05 AM

 

By the late 2010s, glasses will beam images directly onto the retina. Ten terabytes of computing power (roughly the same as the human brain) will cost about $1,000.


By the 2020s, most diseases will go away as nanobots become smarter than current medical technology. Normal human eating can be replaced by nanosystems. The Turing test begins to be passable. Self-driving cars begin to take over the roads, and people won’t be allowed to drive on highways.


By the 2030s, virtual reality will begin to feel 100% real. We will be able to upload our mind/consciousness by the end of the decade.


By the 2040s, non-biological intelligence will be a billion times more capable than biological intelligence (a.k.a. us). Nanotech foglets will be able to make food out of thin air and create any object in physical world at a whim.


By 2045, we will multiply our intelligence a billionfold by linking wirelessly from our neocortex to a synthetic neocortex in the cloud.

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The secrets behind successful Wearables In Fashion

The secrets behind successful Wearables In Fashion | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Wearables In Fashion about a hungry market waiting fashionable wearables, wearable technology that makes their owners look cool and trendy.

Via TechinBiz, Richard Platt
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Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s curator insight, January 26, 11:39 PM

Once this highly practical fashion trend gains traction, you won't care how strange it looks.  Imaging not having to recharge your digital devices from clumbsy wall "warts" or having your smartphone die because you forgot to charge it.  With solar cells integrated in your clothing, you can charge your digital devices as you go about your business, walk to work, or even jogging to keep in shape.  A win-win for everyone.  Aloha, Russ.

Richard Platt's curator insight, January 27, 3:22 AM

Here are the Secrets (that aren't so secret):

  • Deliver Real Value
  • Price And Affordability
  • Image And Aesthetics
  • Durability
  • Cultural Acceptance
  • Developer Support
  • Full Integration – Be Smarter
  • Battery Life
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Why the modern world is bad for your brain

Why the modern world is bad for your brain | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Multitasking is an essential skill in the era of email, text messages, Facebook and Twitter. But, argues neuroscientist Daniel J Levitin, it’s actually making us less efficient

Via Spaceweaver
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John Page's curator insight, January 25, 7:44 PM

This article speaks exactly about the title. It talks about how all of the things going on in the modern world is too much for our minds to handle because they are so busy. All of this multitasking produces stress which is not good for your body or your health. We have become robots that must check our phones or we will not be able to function, it talks about how if there is an email in the unread bin then our IQ goes down by up to 10 points. Media is very important in this because it will spread this and let people become aware of what we are doing to our brain.