Chasing the Future
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Chasing the Future
information related to new technologies & innovation, developments in science and space exploration
Curated by Sílvia Dias
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Regenerative Buildings Make Positive Contributions to the Environment

Regenerative Buildings Make Positive Contributions to the Environment | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
A Vancouver building illustrates how architecture can make an active, positive contribution to the environment.

 It’s great that buildings can minimize harm, right down to being carbon-neutral and zero-emission. But what if they could be designed to take it a step further—to give back to nature and make a positive contribution to the environment? This concept is known as regenerative design.


Via Lauren Moss
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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, May 23, 2015 6:29 PM

Regenerative Design. Buildings that add  to the environment.

Jaclyn Phi's curator insight, August 6, 2015 2:39 PM

"It’s great that buildings can minimize harm, right down to being carbon-neutral and zero-emission. But what if they could be designed to take it a step further—to give back to nature and make a positive contribution to the environment? This concept is known as regenerative design."

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Farming Nemo: How Aquaculture Will Feed 9 Billion Hungry People

Farming Nemo: How Aquaculture Will Feed 9 Billion Hungry People | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Shrimp fountains don't grow on trees, you know—nor do Ahi Tuna steaks, Fish McBites, or fried calamari. But that hasn't stopped an increasingly affluent human population from annually demanding more and more seafood. As a result, an estimated 85 percent of the ocean's fish stocks are now either fully exploited or overfished. But an ancient form of aquatic farming, and current $60 billion-a-year industry, may hold the key to both protecting wild fish populations and your local sushi shop.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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How 3D printing could revolutionise the solar energy industry

How 3D printing could revolutionise the solar energy industry | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

More efficient, less complex and cheaper, 3D solar cells can also capture more sunlight than conventional PV models


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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CineversityTV's curator insight, May 31, 2013 10:04 AM

when will this hit the market?

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UNT Researchers Create C-lignin (Plant) Based Stronger Carbon Fiber - BioNews Texas

UNT Researchers Create C-lignin (Plant) Based Stronger Carbon Fiber - BioNews Texas | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
UNT Researchers Create C-lignin (Plant) Based Stronger Carbon Fiber BioNews Texas UNT reports that the new carbon fiber is projected to replace common petroleum and coal-based carbon fiber materials in a wide range of goods, including parts for...

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The Hotel at the end of the Earth by Saunders Architecture

The Hotel at the end of the Earth by Saunders Architecture | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

The Fogo Island Inn and art gallery designed by Saunders Architecture is situated on the rugged coast of Newfoundland, Canada. The 29 guest rooms all face the ocean and look onto the fishing grounds that originally attracted people to Fogo Island centuries ago.


 


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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, February 1, 2014 7:01 PM

Ecological and self-sustaining systems were subtly integrated from the beginning of the project, incorporating technologies to reduce and conserve energy and water usage. 

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How Biomimicry is Shaping the Nature of our Buildings | Sustainable Cities Collective

How Biomimicry is Shaping the Nature of our Buildings | Sustainable Cities Collective | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
When you think of nature as it applies to building design, however, there is a new “nature” within a building. It is a concept termed biomimicry, which literally means to mimic life.

 

Applied biomimicry can be utilized in three ways or in a combination of these three ways:

Form - such as mimicking dragonfly wings to create lightweight structures;

 

Processes -such as mimicking photosynthesis to capture solar energy;

 

Systems-such as building wall systems that mimic the homeostasis in organisms which allows them to regulate their internal conditions such as temperature


Via Anne Caspari
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Anne Caspari's comment, March 27, 2013 5:51 PM
genius.