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Chasing the Future
information related to new technologies & innovation, developments in science and space exploration
Curated by Sílvia Dias
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These Fascinating New Nanobots seek out & Destroy Cancerous Tumors

These Fascinating New Nanobots seek out & Destroy Cancerous Tumors | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Whether they're sneaking between cells or turning cockroaches into living 8-bit computers , nanobots are insanely fascinating.

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Infographic: Where Will mHealth Be in 2024?

Infographic: Where Will mHealth Be in 2024? | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Ten years ago, mHealth as we presently know it didn't exist. But ten years from now, its sophistication and utility may be far greater than anything we can

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Geraldine Hamilton: Body parts on a chip

It's relatively easy to imagine a new medicine, a better cure for some disease. The hard part, though, is testing it, and that can delay promising new cures for years. In this well-explained talk, Geraldine Hamilton shows how her lab creates organs and body parts on a chip, simple structures with all the pieces essential to testing new medications -- even custom cures for one specific person.


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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 15, 2013 9:26 PM

We think this is an aweeome video, Geraldine Hamilton is totally awesome she is really geting at the heart of issues in the big pharma and healthcare field and addressing the issues intelligently, nothing but right on the lady, well worth every minute of this short video. Check it out it also has play in the semiconductor realm as well, (also why we like this too)

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This Robot Is Changing How We Cure Diseases

Every week at an NIH drug-testing lab, a robotics system performs millions of experiments faster and with greater precision than any human could. The simple goal: to find new treatments and cures. 

 

Visit the full project at http://wsj.com/trials ;


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Usman Sattar
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Mechanical Walking Space Man's curator insight, November 19, 2013 12:00 PM

It's what they do best - let the computers do the mass production and we can concentrate on being [good] human…

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Lasers might be the cure for brain diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's

Lasers might be the cure for brain diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, together with researchers at the Polish Wroclaw University of Technology, have made a discovery that may lead to the curing of diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (the so called mad cow disease) through photo therapy.
The researchers discovered that it is possible to distinguish aggregations of the proteins, believed to cause the diseases, from the the well-functioning proteins in the body by using multi-photon laser technique.


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3D Printing Aims to Deliver Organs on Demand

3D Printing Aims to Deliver Organs on Demand | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Dying patients could someday receive a 3D-printed organ made from their own cells rather than wait on long lists for the short supply of organ transplants. Such a futuristic dream remains far from reality, but university labs and private companies have already taken the first careful steps by using 3D-printing technology to build tiny chunks of organs.


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Kristy Schofield's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:31 PM

so strange!

Joshua Zemanek's curator insight, October 2, 2013 9:07 AM

After reading this article, I thought that creating organs instead of taking them from donors would be so much more efficient in the world today. The only problem is that we are very far from doing so. However, we already have people creating the first steps to creating functioning artificial organs. This would very efficient and helpful for people with major health problems. The furthest they've made it was by building tiny chunks of organs, but that's still revolutionary. My connection to the U.S. is that with the number of accidents in our country, this could help with a ton of medical problems people experience.

Saghit Rethmeier's comment, October 4, 2013 6:29 AM
This is amazing, Its crazy that out techonology is advanced enough to be able to do this. Im interested to see how far it will be taken and what possibilitites there are in the future.
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Tissue engineering: How to build a heart

Tissue engineering: How to build a heart | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

With thousands of people in need of heart transplants, researchers are trying to grow new organs.


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Szabolcs Kósa's curator insight, July 11, 2013 2:53 PM

check out the video too:

 

The heart makers

In this video, Brendan Maher finds out how the technique could be used to develop parts of the heart, like the aortic root and valve, for transplant.

 

http://youtu.be/pd3TFB0wOI0

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Study Shows Nanoparticles in Consumer Products Can Damage DNA

Study Shows Nanoparticles in Consumer Products Can Damage DNA | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Using high-speed screening technology to analyze DNA, a newly published study found that nanoparticles commonly added to consumer products can significantly damage DNA.

Thousands of consumer products — including cosmetics, sunscreens, and clothing — contain nanoparticles added by manufact

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Joel Barker's curator insight, April 10, 6:10 PM

The implications of nanotech begin to show up in the 2nd and 3rd order effects. We need to be very careful with this stuff.  JB

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Nanomedicine: DNA clamp to grab cancer before it develops

Nanomedicine: DNA clamp to grab cancer before it develops | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

As part of an international research project, a team of researchers has developed a DNA clamp that can detect mutations at the DNA level with greater efficiency than methods currently in use. Their work could facilitate rapid screening of those diseases that have a genetic basis, such as cancer, and provide new tools for more advanced nanotechnology.


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In The Hospital Of The Future, Big Data Is One Of Your Doctors

In The Hospital Of The Future, Big Data Is One Of Your Doctors | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

From our genomes to Jawbones, the amount of data about health is exploding. Bringing on top Silicon Valley talent, one NYC hospital is preparing for a future where it can analyze and predict its patients' health needs--and maybe change our understanding of disease.


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Ricardo Pimenta's curator insight, December 6, 2013 10:38 AM

Big Data and Health Science in the Hospital

Mlik Sahib's curator insight, December 9, 2013 7:40 PM

"We’re going to build a health care system where complex models are firing on an almost day-to-day basis."

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Genetic Engineering Enables Human Immunity to Take on Cancer, Revolutionary Therapy

Genetic Engineering Enables Human Immunity to Take on Cancer, Revolutionary Therapy | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Developments in genetic engineering make it possible to 're-programme' the human immune system so that T cells - white blood cells that normally fight viruses - recognize and kill cancer cells. This approach, which directly harnesses the potency of the immune system, holds the prospect of a powerful new weapon in the fight against cancer.


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Ronald 's curator insight, November 18, 2013 10:16 AM

This is the future of research in the medical field. I feel as if this is the job of a biological engineer, however, the splicing of DNA and the "reprogramming" mentioned may involve help from chemists that are contibuting to the project. I think that if this research is pursued by doctors and lab scientists, I will be able to give resolutions to cancer patients when I become a pediatrician. I hope that I will get a chance to contribute while I am attending the Univertsity of Washington, whose cancer facility, as well as the Fred Huchinson Cancer Research Center, is one of the best in the nation. I have relatives who have suffered from cancer, so I know the pain and suffering that patients have to endure. The sooner this problem is adressed, the better. In 2007, cancer took the lives of 8 million people. This number is only increasing as time goes by. WIth this newly found research, perhaps the world can be saved from this terrible disaster.

Lisa Trundley-Banks's curator insight, August 5, 5:18 PM

Curing cancer surely has to be one of the biggest hopes we have from GE.

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How We'll Command the Future With Our Thoughts

How We'll Command the Future With Our Thoughts | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

The minds of man and machine suffer from a glaring disconnect: The inability to interface directly with one another. We have to use our hands, keyboards, and mice to issue commands to our robotic minions and they can only respond via physical sensory mediums. But we can do better. We can use our minds. In fact, we already are.


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Paul P Roberts's curator insight, October 18, 2013 2:26 PM

Given the notion that certain humans can do more than one thing at a time how will we deal with physcially doing one thing whilst be controlling something else?  Recreation and work both at the same time?

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UAlberta researchers discover how immune system kills healthy cells

UAlberta researchers discover how immune system kills healthy cells | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Medical scientists at the University of Alberta have discovered how the immune system kills healthy cells while attacking infections. Their findings could one day lead to better treatments for cancer and viral infections.


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Breakthrough May Lead To Anti-Aging Drugs In Five Years

Breakthrough May Lead To Anti-Aging Drugs In Five Years | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

According to a prominent Australian researcher, drugs that combat aging may be available within five years, following landmark research.
The study, published in a recent issue of the journal Science, finally proves that a single anti-aging enzyme in the body can be targeted, with the potential to prevent age-related diseases and extend lifespans.
The paper shows all of the 117 drugs tested work on the single enzyme through a common mechanism. This means that a whole new class of anti-aging drugs is now viable, which could ultimately prevent cancer, Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes.
"Ultimately, these drugs would treat one disease, but unlike drugs of today, they would prevent 20 others," says the lead author of the paper, Professor David Sinclair, from UNSW Medicine, who is based at Harvard University. "In effect, they would slow aging."


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Roger Ellman's curator insight, March 13, 2013 2:52 AM

Good!  Swiftly - remain youthful!!