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Chasing the Future
information related to new technologies & innovation, developments in science and space exploration
Curated by Sílvia Dias
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NASA 2014 Science Plan


Via Ed Stenson
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Ed Stenson's curator insight, April 21, 9:04 AM

NASA's Science Mission Directorate has released a new 2014 Science Plan.

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Space pollution: Here's every known piece of space debris orbiting Earth

Space pollution: Here's every known piece of space debris orbiting Earth | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Based on a data archive, each spherule in the picture represents a real existing object orbiting in space.

The image was created by German photographer Michael Najjar, a "certified civilian astronauts" who has a ticket to go to space on board Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo in 2014. He titled the piece "Space Debris I", and created it with the help of the Institute of Aerospace Systems at the Braunschweig University of Technology, the world leading institute for space debris tracking. “Based on a data archive, each spherule in the picture represents a real existing object orbiting in space," Najjar says. As you can see, space isn't so empty, at least not in Earth's orbit.


Via Lauren Moss
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SpaceFab: 3D printing and robotic assembly in space

SpaceFab: 3D printing and robotic assembly in space | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

SpiderFab, a series of technologies under development by Tethers Unlimited, Inc. (TUI), combines 3D printing and robotic assembly to build and create spaceship components and structures in orbit. The groundbreaking systems are being designed to enable on-orbit construction of antennas, booms, solar arrays, trusses and other multifunctional components, ten to hundreds of times larger than currently possible with existing technology.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Exoplanète: Kepler découvre trois super-Terre en zone habitable

Exoplanète: Kepler découvre trois super-Terre en zone habitable | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
La mission Kepler de la NASA a découvert deux nouveaux systèmes planétaires qui comprennent trois super-Terre dans la "zone habitable" de leur étoile, c'est-à-dire dans une zone...

Via Gust MEES
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Millionaire Dennis Tito plans to send woman and man to Mars and back

Millionaire Dennis Tito plans to send woman and man to Mars and back | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Millionaire space tourist Dennis Tito's plan to send two astronauts on a 501-day flight that zooms past Mars and swings back to Earth would set plenty of precedents on the final frontier — but the most intriguing precedent might have to do with the astronauts that are to be sent: one man and one woman, preferably a married couple beyond childbearing years.

 

 


Via Stratocumulus, Szabolcs Kósa
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Space elevator could be built by 2035

Space elevator could be built by 2035 | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Imagine a ribbon roughly one hundred million times as long as it is wide. If it were a meter long, it would be 10 nanometers wide, or just a few times thicker than a DNA double helix. Scaled up to the length of a football field, it would still be less than a micrometer across — smaller than a red blood cell. Would you trust your life to that thread? What about a tether 100,000 kilometers long, one stretching from the surface of the Earth to well past geostationary orbit (GEO, 22,236 miles up), but which was still somehow narrower than your own wingspan?

The idea of climbing such a ribbon with just your body weight sounds precarious enough, but the ribbon predicted by a new report from the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) will be able to carry up to seven 20-ton payloads at once. It will serve as a tether stretching far beyond geostationary (aka geosynchronous) orbit and held taught by an anchor of roughly two million kilograms. Sending payloads up this backbone could fundamentally change the human relationship with space — every climber sent up the tether could match the space shuttle in capacity, allowing up to a “launch” every couple of days.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Szabolcs Kósa, Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, March 9, 12:49 AM

Think I will pass on this

Linda Liem's curator insight, March 9, 8:06 AM

Science fiction may be coming true.

Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, March 10, 10:41 PM

Hundreds of challenges remain to be solved but as even NASA struggles to maintain an edge, the pay-off of a Space Elevator has never been clearer. The original idea of Konstantin Tsiolkovsky which Arthur C. Clarke turned into a novel could be the revolution space exploration needs.

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Débris spatiaux : le point de non-retour a-t-il été atteint ?

Débris spatiaux : le point de non-retour a-t-il été atteint ? | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Bien que les agences spatiales travaillent à rendre l’espace plus propre, la population des débris spatiaux augmente encore. Pour certains, la situation est si grave que la Terre a accroché une exponentielle....

Via Gust MEES
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SpaceFab: 3D printing and robotic assembly in space

SpaceFab: 3D printing and robotic assembly in space | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

SpiderFab, a series of technologies under development by Tethers Unlimited, Inc. (TUI), combines 3D printing and robotic assembly to build and create spaceship components and structures in orbit. The groundbreaking systems are being designed to enable on-orbit construction of antennas, booms, solar arrays, trusses and other multifunctional components, ten to hundreds of times larger than currently possible with existing technology.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Giant NASA spider robots could 3D print lunar base

Giant NASA spider robots could 3D print lunar base | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Would heat iron nanoparticles to create solid, ceramic-like blocks.

Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 3, 2013 5:08 PM

The first lunar base on the Moon may not be built by human hands, but rather by a giant spider-like robot built by NASA that can bind the dusty soil into giant bubble structures where astronauts can live, conduct experiments, relax or perhaps even cultivate crops.