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Chasing the Future
information related to new technologies & innovation, developments in science and space exploration
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Hacker Clones Fingerprint from Photograph

Hacker Clones Fingerprint from Photograph | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Jan Krissler replicated the fingerprint of Germany's defense minister by using several photos of her right thumb taken at public events.

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SolaRoad: World's first solar cycle path to open in the Netherlands

SolaRoad: World's first solar cycle path to open in the Netherlands | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Imtech, in conjunction with the Province of Noord-Holland, Ooms Civiel, has developed the world's first solar road located in Krommwnie, Holland. The solar cycle path will be connected to the national grid to meet increasing energy demands and to advance of renewable energy use in Holland. It will be ...

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Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s curator insight, November 9, 2014 12:09 AM

Outstanding idea.  Imagine our interstates lined with solar cells.  Such "solar paths" could lessen our dependence of fossil fuels.  Aloha, Russ.

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Space elevator could be built by 2035

Space elevator could be built by 2035 | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Imagine a ribbon roughly one hundred million times as long as it is wide. If it were a meter long, it would be 10 nanometers wide, or just a few times thicker than a DNA double helix. Scaled up to the length of a football field, it would still be less than a micrometer across — smaller than a red blood cell. Would you trust your life to that thread? What about a tether 100,000 kilometers long, one stretching from the surface of the Earth to well past geostationary orbit (GEO, 22,236 miles up), but which was still somehow narrower than your own wingspan?

The idea of climbing such a ribbon with just your body weight sounds precarious enough, but the ribbon predicted by a new report from the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) will be able to carry up to seven 20-ton payloads at once. It will serve as a tether stretching far beyond geostationary (aka geosynchronous) orbit and held taught by an anchor of roughly two million kilograms. Sending payloads up this backbone could fundamentally change the human relationship with space — every climber sent up the tether could match the space shuttle in capacity, allowing up to a “launch” every couple of days.


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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, March 9, 2014 12:49 AM

Think I will pass on this

Linda Liem's curator insight, March 9, 2014 8:06 AM

Science fiction may be coming true.

Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, March 10, 2014 10:41 PM

Hundreds of challenges remain to be solved but as even NASA struggles to maintain an edge, the pay-off of a Space Elevator has never been clearer. The original idea of Konstantin Tsiolkovsky which Arthur C. Clarke turned into a novel could be the revolution space exploration needs.

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We're One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion Energy

We're One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion Energy | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Scientists with the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory announced today that they have achieved a critical step in fusion research: For the first time, their hydrogen fuel has given off more energy than it took in.


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Martin Jaime De Alda Earle's curator insight, February 15, 2014 11:52 AM

¿Sería bueno? Sí pero.....

Celest Ybarra's curator insight, March 29, 2014 8:26 PM

Title: We're One Step Closer to Nuclear Fusion Energy

Author: Adam Mann

Main Idea: Scientists have a breakthrough and have discovered a new way to harness power through the use of fusion.

Summary:

1) The National Ignition Facility (NIF) have achieved a critical step in fusion research: hydrogen fuel has given off more energy than it took in.

2) Nuclear fusion is the energy source of the stars., and can now give off as much as 1.7 times more energy than it had taken in

3) Troubles came when scientists found it was extremely difficult to get their hydrogen fuel to compress in the right way, but  NIF scientists learned from their experiments, and tweaked their designs

Opinion: No, this article was based off of facts, research, and assumptions buy scientists.

Questions: How will nuclear energy effect the environment? Can it be used for war?

Is this article important to science?: Yes, because it was such a big breakthrough in science and can one day be a major energy resource.

Source: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2014/02/fusion-power-not-yet/

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This Robot Is Changing How We Cure Diseases

Every week at an NIH drug-testing lab, a robotics system performs millions of experiments faster and with greater precision than any human could. The simple goal: to find new treatments and cures. 

 

Visit the full project at http://wsj.com/trials ;


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Mechanical Walking Space Man's curator insight, November 19, 2013 3:00 PM

It's what they do best - let the computers do the mass production and we can concentrate on being [good] human…

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Biology Confronts Data Complexity

Biology Confronts Data Complexity | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

New technologies have launched the life sciences into the age of big data. Biologists must now make sense of their informational windfall.


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Gary Bamford's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:53 AM

The very definition of 'complexity'!

Germán Morales's curator insight, October 22, 2013 11:26 AM

Tratar la vida como un cumulo de datos... qué se yo... estamos yendo a eso.

tatiyana fuentes's curator insight, October 24, 2013 8:49 AM

It was difficult to find sequence the human genome, but now it’s comparatively simple to compare genomes of the microorganisms living in our bodies, the ocean, the soil, and everywhere because of the new technologies. Life scientists are embarking on countless other big data projects, including efforts to analyze the genomes of many cancers, to map the human brain, and to develop better biofuels and other crops. Compared to fields like physics, astronomy and computer science that have been dealing with the challenges of massive datasets for decades, the big data revolution in biology has also been quick, leaving little time to adapt. Biologists must overcome a number of hurdles, from storing and moving data to integrating and analyzing it, which will require a substantial cultural shift.

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Fusion milestone passed at US lab

Fusion milestone passed at US lab | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Harnessing fusion - the process that powers the Sun - could provide an unlimited and cheap source of energy.

But to be viable, fusion power plants would have to produce more energy than they consume, which has proven elusive.

Now, a breakthrough by scientists at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) could boost hopes of scaling up fusion.


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UAlberta researchers discover how immune system kills healthy cells

UAlberta researchers discover how immune system kills healthy cells | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Medical scientists at the University of Alberta have discovered how the immune system kills healthy cells while attacking infections. Their findings could one day lead to better treatments for cancer and viral infections.


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Quantum invisibility cloak could hide objects from reality | ExtremeTech

Quantum invisibility cloak could hide objects from reality | ExtremeTech | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Researchers believe it is possible to create a quantum invisibility cloak. Anything hidden in it would be shielded from reality on a quantum level.

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Aster C. Linn's comment, June 19, 2013 6:02 AM
Also, what else is interesting, is "telepathy," i.e., that "thoughts" (electromagnetic impulses) can travel any distance, know no barrier, and can be received at any distance - faster than the speed of light - in the twinkling of an eye.
Akilade Ayotunde's comment, June 23, 2013 7:08 AM
If only we could discover the secret of magnifying those impulses we would be half-way to sending parcels by teleporting...
Mark Vangoidtsenhoven's comment, June 23, 2013 2:15 PM
Yes , Guys , that's all so true what you write here !!! Thanks for the respns !!!
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3D Ultrasound Reveals Baby in Color

3D Ultrasound Reveals Baby in Color | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
GE's new HDlive ultrasound creates a clear and colorful 3D image of a fetus in utero. Parents get an excellent view of their child-to-be and doctors are able to see details that...

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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 19, 2013 1:04 AM

 

GE's new HDlive ultrasound creates a clear and colorful 3D image of a fetus in utero. Parents get an excellent view of their child-to-be and doctors are able to see details that let them more accurately assess the fetus's health.


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Yes, For Real, It’s An Invisible Bicycle Helmet And It IS Awesome

Yes, For Real, It’s An Invisible Bicycle Helmet And It IS Awesome | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
I love smart design, when you can just look at a product or service and be able to see the methodical, thorough, detail-oriented thinking process that went behind it, aimed at solving a problem, innovating, and disregarding convention.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 28, 2013 2:07 PM

 

A MUST watch video, great idea!!!

 

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The Power of Swarms Can Help Us Fight Cancer, Understand the Brain, and Predict the Future

The Power of Swarms Can Help Us Fight Cancer, Understand the Brain, and Predict the Future | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Aristotle first posited that the whole could be more than the sum of its parts. Ever since, philosophers, physicists, chemists, and biologists have periodically rediscovered the idea. But it was only in the computer age—with the ability to iterate simple rule sets millions of times over—that this hazy concept came into sharp focus.


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Joe Stafura's comment, May 14, 2013 11:09 AM
Though we typically think of flocking as a behavioral trait of birds and fish, a closer look shows humans exhibit a tendency to flock in many situations that we mistake as an individual choice.
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CAVE2 (TM) Hybrid Reality Environment - Trailer 2

Second Trailer for CAVE2 Hybrid Reality System, 2012. http://www.evl.uic.edu/core.php?mod=4&type=1&indi=424 At 37 Megapixels of 3D resolution, CAVE2 is the w...

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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 9, 2013 5:02 PM

 

A MUST watch, WOW!


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SCiO: A pocket molecular sensor for all !

Scan materials or physical objects. Get instant relevant information to your smartphone. Food, medicine, plants, and more. 


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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 1, 2014 1:33 AM

Very cool technology, applications are very wide.  Reminded me of Spock's tricorder.

Jaqueline Urania MoraesVarjao's curator insight, December 1, 2014 11:19 AM

Here to stay....technbology to allow all of us to identify which parts/areas of our environment are actually useful to each one of us!

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Metropolis Magazine, March 2014

Metropolis Magazine, March 2014 | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
How biomimetics could be the key to our urban future

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Bionic City's curator insight, March 28, 2014 6:04 PM

'Scientists predict that extreme meteorological events are becoming more frequent and destructive. For instance late last year, Typhoon Haiyan, the strongest storm recorded in the world so far, decimated central island cities in the Philippines. Recent data sourced from the Japanese Meteorological Agency indicated extreme weather occurrences across the globe. These pose critical challenges to our current and future rebuilding programs in cities where extreme weather has become the new “benchmark for disaster prevention,” as suggested during a congress meeting in the Philippines by the UN Champion for Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation for Asia Pacific, Senator Loren Legarda. What are the systems and strategies that can get us to resiliency?

 

In searching for sustainable strategies for the Leapfrog Project for Central Philippines rebuilding program, I came across the Global Innovation Science Handbook. The volume, compiled by the International Journal of Innovation Science, contains 50 chapters, each one of which tackles innovation within a variety of industries. The book's ninth chapter, "Biomimetics: Learning from Life," focuses on biomimetics and suggests ways that the built environment can learn from the natural world. The text, written by design scientist and futurist Melissa, grips you with insights on two great fields of human endeavor: leading-edge science and technology. While it has a sense of otherworldliness bordering on “[a] science fiction film set far in the future,” as Sterry describes, it’s delivered in an accessible prose that will be appreciated by practicing architects, designers, and even casual readers. The text provokes thought about biomimetics as the intuitive part of our natural self and environment.' 

 

Read more at http://www.metropolismag.com/Point-of-View/March-2014/We-Can-Make-Our-Cities-More-Resilient-by-Making-Them-More-Natural/

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Building Artificial Cells Will Be a Noisy Business

Building Artificial Cells Will Be a Noisy Business | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Engineers like to make things that work. And if one wants to make something work using nanoscale components—the size of proteins, antibodies, and viruses—mimicking the behavior of cells is a good place to start since cells carry an enormous amount of information in a very tiny packet. As Erik Winfree, professor of computer science, computation and neutral systems, and bioengineering, explains, "I tend to think of cells as really small robots. Biology has programmed natural cells, but now engineers are starting to think about how we can program artificial cells. We want to program something about a micron in size, finer than the dimension of a human hair, that can interact with its chemical environment and carry out the spectrum of tasks that biological things do, but according to our instructions."


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Dave Kuhr's curator insight, February 26, 2014 7:53 PM

Pretty interesting, while I am sure this is still a very long way off, being able to print a cure for a disease could be the ultimate medical advancement.

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Geraldine Hamilton: Body parts on a chip

It's relatively easy to imagine a new medicine, a better cure for some disease. The hard part, though, is testing it, and that can delay promising new cures for years. In this well-explained talk, Geraldine Hamilton shows how her lab creates organs and body parts on a chip, simple structures with all the pieces essential to testing new medications -- even custom cures for one specific person.


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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:26 AM

We think this is an aweeome video, Geraldine Hamilton is totally awesome she is really geting at the heart of issues in the big pharma and healthcare field and addressing the issues intelligently, nothing but right on the lady, well worth every minute of this short video. Check it out it also has play in the semiconductor realm as well, (also why we like this too)

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Genetic Engineering Enables Human Immunity to Take on Cancer, Revolutionary Therapy

Genetic Engineering Enables Human Immunity to Take on Cancer, Revolutionary Therapy | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Developments in genetic engineering make it possible to 're-programme' the human immune system so that T cells - white blood cells that normally fight viruses - recognize and kill cancer cells. This approach, which directly harnesses the potency of the immune system, holds the prospect of a powerful new weapon in the fight against cancer.


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Ronald 's curator insight, November 18, 2013 1:16 PM

This is the future of research in the medical field. I feel as if this is the job of a biological engineer, however, the splicing of DNA and the "reprogramming" mentioned may involve help from chemists that are contibuting to the project. I think that if this research is pursued by doctors and lab scientists, I will be able to give resolutions to cancer patients when I become a pediatrician. I hope that I will get a chance to contribute while I am attending the Univertsity of Washington, whose cancer facility, as well as the Fred Huchinson Cancer Research Center, is one of the best in the nation. I have relatives who have suffered from cancer, so I know the pain and suffering that patients have to endure. The sooner this problem is adressed, the better. In 2007, cancer took the lives of 8 million people. This number is only increasing as time goes by. WIth this newly found research, perhaps the world can be saved from this terrible disaster.

Lisa Trundley-Banks's curator insight, August 5, 2014 8:18 PM

Curing cancer surely has to be one of the biggest hopes we have from GE.

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Human Brain Project: Henry Markram plans to spend €1bn building a perfect model of the human brain

Human Brain Project: Henry Markram plans to spend €1bn building a perfect model of the human brain | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Henry Markram tells how his son's autism fired his ambition to unlock the secrets of consciousness by using 'big data' to trace the electronic signals that zing between neurons


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Paul P Roberts's curator insight, October 16, 2013 5:36 AM

With a ten year time frame its arrival might be a little late for some in the research market but any outputs may change the way we view human behaviour and thus how we conduct market research.

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3D Printing Aims to Deliver Organs on Demand

3D Printing Aims to Deliver Organs on Demand | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Dying patients could someday receive a 3D-printed organ made from their own cells rather than wait on long lists for the short supply of organ transplants. Such a futuristic dream remains far from reality, but university labs and private companies have already taken the first careful steps by using 3D-printing technology to build tiny chunks of organs.


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Kristy Schofield's curator insight, September 28, 2013 6:31 PM

so strange!

Joshua Zemanek's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:07 PM

After reading this article, I thought that creating organs instead of taking them from donors would be so much more efficient in the world today. The only problem is that we are very far from doing so. However, we already have people creating the first steps to creating functioning artificial organs. This would very efficient and helpful for people with major health problems. The furthest they've made it was by building tiny chunks of organs, but that's still revolutionary. My connection to the U.S. is that with the number of accidents in our country, this could help with a ton of medical problems people experience.

Saghit Rethmeier's comment, October 4, 2013 9:29 AM
This is amazing, Its crazy that out techonology is advanced enough to be able to do this. Im interested to see how far it will be taken and what possibilitites there are in the future.
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How Machine Learning and Big Data Are Changing the Face of Biological Sciences

Until recently, the wet lab has been a crucial component of every biologist. Today's advances in the production of massive amounts of data and the creation of machine-learning algorithms for processing that data are changing the face of biological science—making it possible to do real science without a wet lab. David Heckerman shares several examples of how this transformation in the area of genomics is changing the pace of scientific breakthroughs.


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davidgibson's curator insight, May 28, 2013 11:05 PM

This 36 min video is well worth the time spent - to get an idea (hopefully a transferrable one) about Big Data and the frontiers of science. In this case both "wet lab" (test tubes microscopes) and "dry lab" (computer modeling with machine learning) and needed and so is content as well as computational literacy.

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Grippe : vers un vaccin à large spectre d’un nouveau genre

Grippe : vers un vaccin à large spectre d’un nouveau genre | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Les scientifiques espèrent développer un seul et unique vaccin qui immuniserait contre toutes les formes de grippe. Ils pourraient s’inspirer d’une nanoparticule, formée de deux types de protéines et...

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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 26, 2013 8:33 AM

 

Ce serait génial...

 

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Layered '2-D nanocrystals' promising new semiconductor

Layered '2-D nanocrystals' promising new semiconductor | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Researchers are developing a new type of semiconductor technology for future computers and electronics based on 'two-dimensional nanocrystals' layered in sheets less than a nanometer thick that could replace today's transistors.

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3D printing breakthrough with human embryonic stem cells

3D printing breakthrough with human embryonic stem cells | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
A team of researchers from Scotland has used a novel 3-D printing technique to arrange human embryonic stem cells for the very first time.

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Making axons branch and grow to help nerve regeneration after injury

Making axons branch and grow to help nerve regeneration after injury | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—One molecule makes nerve cells grow longer. Another one makes them grow branches.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 23, 2013 11:01 AM

 

One molecule makes nerve cells grow longer. Another one makes them grow branches. These new experimental manipulations have taken researchers a step closer to understanding how nerve cells are repaired at their farthest reaches after injury. 

Read more at: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-03-axons-nerve-regeneration-injury.html#jCp