innovative libraries
11.4K views | +0 today
Follow
 
innovative libraries
collecting ideas, teasers for libraries from libraries all over the world
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Get Moving | Library Design

Get Moving | Library Design | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Get Moving | Library Design
By Traci Lesneski on September 26, 2017 Leave a Comment
Encouraging activity in today’s libraries

Quality 21st-century library design focuses on human health and well-being. Creating healthy indoor environments that physically connect us to the outdoors, offer access to daylight and views, and motivate us to move our bodies more is critical, since, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, on average, Americans spend 93 percent of their lives indoors. The focus on prioritizing daylight and views and incorporating biophilic tenets (which acknowledge the role of nature in human comfort and productivity) has increased awareness about the critical role the building plays in wellness.
The next frontier in creating buildings that support human health is encouraging more movement. Sitting for hours at a time is hard on our bodies, which are more suited for an active lifestyle. But standing all the time isn’t healthy either. Research supports the need for active learning or working environments; those that keep us changing our postures and get us moving throughout the day support wellness. Sit-to-stand desks are becoming ubiquitous in staff areas and increasingly common in public areas of libraries. Although these desks allow ease of alternating between sitting and standing while working or studying, they don’t address the need simply to move more often.
A few minutes of activity can reap benefits such as increased focus and improved mood, according to the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. For more ideas on how to get your users moving, Lets Move in Libraries shares stories of how libraries across North America are encouraging users to move their bodies. The site includes an interactive map of Canada and the United States that highlights movement-focused programs and services, so one can learn what colleagues at nearby facilities are doing or testing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Library and Information Science Videos

Library and Information Science Videos | innovative libraries | Scoop.it


200 Most Fantastic Library and Information Science Videos Every Librarian Must See

Library and Information Science Videos is an initiative of Librarianship Studies & Information Technology blog to showcase the finest LIS videos for librarians, catalogers, metadata, archives, and knowledge professionals. The videos are sourced from Librarianship Studies & Information Technology YouTube Channel which are organized based on the categories (or labels) of Librarianship Studies blog.

A featured video will be displayed in this blog post along with a brief summary. It will also be displayed at the bottom of the blog in a large view (recommended).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Tucson’s seed library fosters food sovereignty in a desert

Tucson’s seed library fosters food sovereignty in a desert | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

In front of the Joel D. Valdez Main Library in Tucson, patrons can claim round concrete landscaping beds for free and create their own gardens with seeds from the library’s seed collection. Some of the three-foot-wide planters are festooned with exuberant jungles of squash, flowers and trellised bean plants, while others look more Zen garden than vegetable garden.

In addition to books and DVDs, in 2012 the Pima Country Public Library system became one of the first in the nation to circulate seeds. Aspiring gardeners can look up varieties electronically, put seeds on reserve and check out 10 packs at a time. Availability changes with the seasons: By mid-September, tomato seeds are long gone, but many other seeds — including dill, arugula, cucumbers, the flat white teardrop shapes of squash seeds, and the small dry beads of tepary beans — rattle in paper envelopes. Participating branches offer support as well as seeds, such as gardening classes, brochures, and, of course, books. The greenest beds flourish with flowers, herbs, vegetables and an idea: That public libraries can be resources for local food growers as well as local readers.

The Seed Library is a free service where patrons can check out seeds just like they would check out a book. When they have harvested the fruit or vegetable, they can return their new seeds to the library.
Now, five years in, Pima County librarians hope more growers will start bringing back seeds from the plants they grew, making the collection stronger and better adapted to local conditions over time. "Only maybe 40 percent of the donations we get are from local growers,” says librarian Betsy Langley, who helps manage the seed program. “We want to increase that and have a larger proportion of our circulating seeds be from local gardeners, because one of our goals is to have healthy seed stock and plants that are acclimated to Tucson.” 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Here's How You Can Use Google to Find eBooks Available at Your Local Library

Here's How You Can Use Google to Find eBooks Available at Your Local Library | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
A new Google Search feature is making it easier for users to find digital copies of their favorite books that are available at their local libraries.
Google said on Monday that the online search giant has added a new feature that will now show up in the search results for any book title, listing local public libraries where users can borrow the title in ebook form.
The list of libraries with available ebooks will appear as part of Google's "Knowledge Graph" cards, the boxed-off sections that appear either above or next to the regular list of search results, which already offered information on searched-for books, such as a description of the book, the author's name, GoodReads ratings, and options for purchasing an ebook.
Google users will find the list of libraries carrying a specific ebook title under a section titled "Borrow ebook," which the company displayed in a Tweet on Monday that featured a screenshot of a mobile search for an ebook version of the children's book Mr. Lemoncello's Library Olympics.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Libraries and Self-Publishing | Lulu.com

Libraries and Self-Publishing | Lulu.com | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Libraries. A time honored monument to our desire to preserve our past and share our stories. Since people first began setting down their stories on paper, the idea of a library as both a physical place and an institution has been central to how we organize society. The details change over time, but the purpose remains the same: store and make available to the public the knowledge and stories of the past and present.

Some years ago, as the Internet worked its way into our daily lives, there was an undercurrent of fear that the usefulness of libraries might have begun to wane. The information they stored in vast stacks of books could be digitized and presented in the palm of your hand. The questions that could absorb hours of scouring books were answered in moments with a Google search.

Thankfully we know that the Internet won’t directly be replacing libraries any time soon. What the Internet revolution taught us about libraries is that the institution still serves many vital purposes in their communities. From a place to go for a new novel, to a central locale for research, libraries evolved into a hub for information, web access, and a dedicated ‘maker-space’ for do-it-yourself minded people.

Sounds like a place perfect for self-publishing, doesn’t it?

Yet self-publishing and libraries have been slow to connect in many of the ways you would expect. Happily, we can observe that trend changing, as more libraries around the world are finding ways to incorporate self-publishing. The movement to promote community involvement and foster a creative world is one shared by both libraries and self-publishers; this connection alone is reason enough to recognize the need for libraries to embrace self-publishing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Thanks to Tech Upgrades, Millennials Love Public Libraries

Thanks to Tech Upgrades, Millennials Love Public Libraries | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

New tech like makerspaces and 3D printing, as well as back-end infrastructure revamps, are playing a role in the next generation flocking to libraries.


If you thought millennials were going to be the end of public libraries, think again.
A new study by the Pew Charitable Trust finds that the millennial generation is more likely than any other to use public libraries. According to the study, 53 percent of millennials said they had used a public library or bookmobile in the last 12 months, compared to just 45 percent of Gen Xers and 43 percent of baby boomers.

How Libraries Are Becoming Tech Hubs

While books are a draw for the younger generation, technology seems to be a major factor in their decision to frequent the local library and peruse the shelves. One harbinger of this is that more than 40 percent of millennials said they had used a library website in the past 12 months, compared to just 24 percent of baby boomers, according to Pew’s most recent report.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Technology Trends Reshape Today’s Libraries

Technology Trends Reshape Today’s Libraries | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Modernizing learning in the 21st-century school can start in the library.

by Wendy McMahonTwitter
Wendy McMahon is a freelance writer and general tech geek who has been writing about technology for over 10 years. Follower her on Twitter at @wendymcmahon.
School libraries across the country are changing drastically to accommodate the new tech-infused needs of students.

Driving these changes are trends like makerspaces, flexible learning commons and the flexible furniture needed to accommodate it all, reports Technavio.

In these new future-focused libraries, students sip lattes while they do research in café-styled spaces, collaborate on group projects in glass-walled study rooms and move flexible furniture to suit their group and project needs.

Students also use green screens, conferencing technology, virtual reality tools and a host of other technology tools designed to support collaboration, creativity, innovation and more.

Why Are Libraries the Perfect Flexible Learning Spaces?

Kecia Ray, past president of the ISTE board of directors and executive director for the Center for Digital Education, explains that when support for modern education trends begins in school libraries — as opposed to individual classrooms — it ensures access to the latest technology and learning methods for all students and educators.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

The Library of the Future

The New Taipei City Library is a hub of innovation and learning. Spanning floors and generations as well as offering a unique reading and learning experience for people from all walks of life, this library of the future has something for everyone!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

New Yorkers Can Now Stream 30,000 Free Movies, Including the Entire Criterion Collection, with Their Library Cards

New Yorkers Can Now Stream 30,000 Free Movies, Including the Entire Criterion Collection, with Their Library Cards | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Anyone who has a New York Public Library or Brooklyn Public Library card can now watch more than 30,000 feature films, documentaries, foreign-language films and training videos.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Virtual reality makes its way to libraries

San Jose Public Libraries received a great that let them receive the Oculus Rift headset and the necessary computers to open up virtual reality to patrons. The grant is a partnership between the California Library Association and Oculus VR.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

What Happened to Google's Effort to Scan Millions of University Library Books? - EdSurge News

What Happened to Google's Effort to Scan Millions of University Library Books? - EdSurge News | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
It was a crazy idea: Take the bulk of the world’s books, scan them, and create a monumental digital library for all to access. That’s what Google dreamed of doing when it embarked on its ambitious book-digitizing project in 2002. It got part of the way there, digitizing at least 25 million books from major university libraries.

But the promised library of everything hasn’t come into being. An epic legal battle between authors and publishers and the Internet giant over alleged copyright violations dragged on for years. A settlement that would have created a Book Rights Registry and made it possible to access the Google Books corpus through public-library terminals ultimately died, rejected by a federal judge in 2011. And though the same judge ultimately dismissed the case in 2013, handing Google a victory that allowed it to keep on scanning, the dream of easy and full access to all those works remains just that.

Earlier this year, an article in the Atlantic lamented the dismantling of what it called “the greatest humanistic project of our time.” The author, a programmer named James Somer, put it like this: “Somewhere at Google there is a database containing 25 million books and nobody is allowed to read them.”

That assessment may be technically true, but many librarians and scholars see the legacy of the project differently. In fact, academics now regularly tap into the reservoir of digitized material that Google helped create, using it as a dataset they can query, even if they can’t consume full texts. It’s a pillar of the humanities’ growing engagement with Big Data.

It’s also a handy resource for other kinds of research. “It’s hard to imagine going through a day doing the work we academics do without touching something that wouldn’t be there without Google Book Search,” says Paul Courant, now interim provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at the University of Michigan. Courant was also interim provost at Michigan when Google first approached the university about scanning the contents of its library—a proposal that left him both “ecstatic and skeptical,” he says.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

What’s this library book doing in my National Park?

What’s this library book doing in my National Park? | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

In early June, I was walking a trail in Land’s End in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, when I came upon a children’s book called The Fox Wish, by Kimiko Aman. Each page was a mounted panel, installed just a few feet away from the next, like storytime breadcrumbs.

It was a delightful book about a fox who steals a little girl’s jump rope, but it got me wondering: What’s a children’s book doing in this National Park?

Well, did you ever hear that opposites attract?

To find out more, I talk to Michele Gee, Chief of Education and Interpretation at the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, a Bay Area National Park. She tells me that last year, when the National Parks Service celebrated it’s centennial, they decided to really focus on a problem they’d been working on for years.

The National Parks reach out

“We have a certain population that loves their National Parks, visits regularly, but that doesn't reflect the diversity of our nation or the diversity of the Bay Area,” says Gee. “Lower income or people of color aren’t being drawn to the National Parks and don't have the access. They both don’t know about it, don't know it exists, but also don't necessarily feel welcome to come.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Penn State Libraries Launch Short Story Dispensers

Penn State Libraries Launch Short Story Dispensers | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Students returning to Pennsylvania State University (PSU) this fall will find four new short story dispensing kiosks installed at libraries across campus, along with a website for submitting their own original stories for distribution through the kiosks. Developed by Short Édition  of Grenoble, France, the kiosks’ simple interface allows users to select a story that takes one, three, or five minutes to read. Their story is then printed out on a narrow piece of sustainably-sourced thermal paper the size of a large receipt.
“Libraries are a pretty logical fit for this,” Joseph A. Salem, associate dean for learning, undergraduate services and Commonwealth Campus Libraries for Penn State, told LJ, noting that part of the goal is to foster creative expression on campus and in the broader community. In addition to units at Penn State’s Paterno, Pattee, Architecture, and Physical and Mathematical Sciences Libraries, a fifth kiosk is installed at the public Schlow Centre Region Library in downtown State College

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Balancing Connections and Collections | Library Design

Balancing Connections and Collections | Library Design | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Making space for users to interact with materials—and one another

It’s a regular day at a regular not-so-quiet library. The tables are full
of groups collaborating on projects. All the study rooms are booked
solid with small meetings and individuals seeking a quiet refuge.
Large gathering spaces are bustling with programs, classes, and
community events. More than ever, users crave places to collaborate, interact, build community, and contemplate.
It’s therefore no surprise that in many types of libraries nationwide, staff are trying to make more space for people. Increasingly, libraries support learning that is social and emotional as well as intellectual, carving out room for Maker spaces, learning commons, flexible spaces, quiet contemplation, and active collaboration. Row upon row of tall bookshelves are not conducive to these emerging uses. “People do not hang out in the stacks,” says Dri Ralph, facilities design coordinator at Washington’s King County Library System (KCLS), who has been involved in 46 library building and renovation projects. Not only is the area for stacks being reduced, what shelves remain are often being lowered to allow for natural light and improved sight lines.
I

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

ACRL announces the release of Academic Library Impact: Improving Practice and Essential Areas to Research

ACRL announces the release of Academic Library Impact: Improving Practice and Essential Areas to Research | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

ACRL announces the release of Academic Library Impact: Improving Practice and Essential Areas to Research. Developed for ACRL by OCLC Research, this valuable resource investigates how libraries can increase student learning and success and effectively communicate their value to higher education stakeholders. The full report is freely available for download on the ACRL website.
Now more than ever, academic libraries are being asked to demonstrate value to their institutional stakeholders, funders, and governance boards. Academic Library Impact builds on ACRL’s 2010 Value of Academic Libraries: A Comprehensive Research Review and Report and the results of the subsequent Assessment in Action program. It demonstrates how libraries are now measuring library contributions to student learning and success, and recommends where more research is needed in areas critical to the higher education sector such as accreditation, student retention, and academic achievement.

Academic Library Impact captures the incredible strides made by the profession in assessing and demonstrating the contributions of academic libraries to the academy, and creates a path for moving us into the future via new research avenues,” says ACRL Executive Director Mary Ellen K. Davis.

This action-oriented research agenda includes:

a report on all project phases and findings; a detailed research agenda based on those findings;
a visualization component that filters relevant literature and creates graphics that can communicate library value to stakeholders; a bibliography of the literature analyzed; and
a full bibliography of the works cited and reviewed.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

October is Health Literacy Month, How will your library participate?

October is Health Literacy Month, How will your library participate? | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Pew recently reported that health information is the second most searched online topic (1). Public libraries are on the frontlines of health information needs of their communities. Public libraries are often the only access to computers and/or broadband in their communities and are a trusted institution (2).  Technology and media literacy are important aspects of health literacy. Over 75% of those seeking health information start a search engine and don’t check the date or the source of the information they encounter! (3).

October is health literacy month and a great time to step up your health game at your library. Some ideas:
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Stuff That Works: A Funder's Valuable Advice for Public Libraries

Stuff That Works: A Funder's Valuable Advice for Public Libraries | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
In his recent piece on Alberto Ibargüen, David Callahan dubbed the Knight Foundation’s long-serving CEO and president "The Futurist" for good reason. The foundation has been working for years to help key institutions in U.S. society navigate an age of disruption. 

Callahan also noted that Ibargüen wanted to move the foundation beyond its constant experimentation and start doubling down on the stuff that "really worked." If the past year is any indication, Ibargüen has been true to his word. Knight has been active in identifying "stuff that works" across several areas—including libraries, an American institution beloved in theory and embattled in practice. 

In June 2016, the foundation announced the winners of its News Challenge on Libraries, which posed the question, "How might libraries serve 21st-century information needs?" The eclectic mix of grantees offered a range of possible ideas.

Related: What Should 21st Century Libraries Look Like? Here are Fourteen Answers.

Knight has also been keen to connect American libraries with trends worldwide. Earlier this year, the foundation sent a cohort of U.S. librarians to the Next Library Conference, an annual gathering held in Aarhus, Denmark, that brings together global leaders to "spread best practices in library innovation, while helping libraries' capacity to meet new digital age demands."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

AIA/ALA Library Building Awards | American Libraries Magazine

AIA/ALA Library Building Awards | American Libraries Magazine | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

The following libraries are winners of the 2017 Library Building Awards, sponsored by the American Institute of Architects and the American Library Association’s Library Leadership and Management Association. The biennial award recognizes the best in library architecture and design and is open to any architect licensed in the United States. Projects may be located anywhere in the world. The recipients of this year’s award include library designs that reflect the needs of their communities.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Stuff That Works: A Funder's Valuable Advice for Public Libraries

Stuff That Works: A Funder's Valuable Advice for Public Libraries | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

In his recent piece on Alberto Ibargüen, David Callahan dubbed the Knight Foundation’s long-serving CEO and president "The Futurist" for good reason. The foundation has been working for years to help key institutions in U.S. society navigate an age of disruption. 

Callahan also noted that Ibargüen wanted to move foundation beyond its constant experimentation and start doubling down on the stuff that "really worked." If the past year is any indication, Ibargüen has been true to his word. Knight has been active in identifying "stuff that works" across several areas—including libraries, an American institution that is beloved in theory and embattled in practice. 

In June 2016, the foundation announced the winners of its News Challenge on Libraries, which posed the question, "How might libraries serve 21st-century information needs?" The eclectic mix of grantees offered a range of possible ideas.

Related: What Should 21st Century Libraries Look Like? Here are Fourteen Answers.

Knight has also been keen to connect up American libraries with trends worldwide. Earlier this year, the foundation sent a cohort of U.S. librarians to the Next Library Conference, an annual gathering held in Aarhus, Denmark that brings together global leaders to "spread best practices in library innovation, while helping libraries' capacity to meet new digital age demands."

Laura Sue Wilansky recently posted takeaways from the conference, "Five Lessons for Libraries Looking to Innovate in the 21st Century," on Knight's blog, and I consider them to be important for two reasons.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

A New Type of Library in a Once-Abandoned Colorado Ranch | National Trust for Historic Preservation

A New Type of Library in a Once-Abandoned Colorado Ranch | National Trust for Historic Preservation | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Along the banks of the South Platte River in Colorado, against the backdrop of the Rocky Mountains, an idea is beginning to take shape. It’s a live-in library, a place where books and nature and history come together, and where writers, researchers, and anyone else can bring a suitcase and stay awhile.

It’s called the Rocky Mountain Land Library, and it’s the vision of Jeff Lee and Ann Martin, two longtime employees at the Tattered Cover Book Store in Denver.

It’s an idea that’s been decades in the making, after Lee and Martin traveled to the London Book Fair in the mid-1990s and took a weekend jaunt to Wales, where they stayed at what is now called Gladstone’s Library. It was a cross between a library and a dormitory, and provided them with a perfect jumping-off point for learning about the country they were visiting.

“We fell in love with the place,” Lee says. “And it really clicked. We thought wouldn’t it be great to have a nature library like that—to have a place where you’ve got this direct connection between the books and the subject. And Colorado is blessed with so many wonderful areas that could host a land library. So when we got back, we started a site search that took us across the state.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

About IFLA Global Vision

The Global Vision discussion is our chance to engage in innovative conversations to unite the library field in the face of ever-increasing globalisation. With six regional workshops already taken place and incredible ideas shared from almost 140 countries, the Global Vision momentum has already begun. Your involvement is crucial in pushing the conversation forward. You can see why the IFLA Global Vision discussion and your role is needed in this video.

See: globalvision.ifla.org
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Spruce Grove Public Library - TumbleBook Cloud - Spruce Grove Public Library

Spruce Grove Public Library - TumbleBook Cloud - Spruce Grove Public Library | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

TumbleBookCloud is an online collection of read-along titles for young adults and adults which features adjustable online text and complete audio narration. It also features National Geographic videos.

Trudy Raymakers's insight:
Coming soon but a great idea for libraries.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

FUTURISTIC LIBRARY IN MEXICO CITY | Eileen Aldis

One of the coolest things to see in Mexico City is a futuristic library called Biblioteca Vasconcelos. It reminds me of something from a sci-fi novel or film. I gasped when I first saw it and it just got more and more incredible the further in I went. The architecture is stunning and unique, like no place I've ever seen before. It was designed by Alberto Kalach and opened in 2007 after three consecutive years of building. There are over half a million books spread out over 38,000 square metres or 409,000 square feet. It's called a 'mega library' because it's actually five libraries melded into one. There are tons of places to sit and work, free wifi, courses and workshops, as well as other community events like free concerts. Don't miss the balconies that give you fantastic views of the Zocalo of Mexico City. If you're a book lover like me or enjoy seeing outstanding architecture, Biblioteca Vasconcelos should not be missed! It's one of the most memorable and favourite places I visited.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Young African Library Innovators initiative | EIFL

Young African Library Innovators initiative | EIFL | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Nineteen African public librarians will travel to Lithuania and Poland as part of IYALI (the Young African Library Innovators initiative).

IYALI is an initiative of the EIFL Public Library Innovation Programme (EIF-PLIP). The initiative aims to expose emerging public library innovators in Africa to experiences and ideas from other developing and transition economy countries.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Episode 16: "Fighting Fake News"

In Episode 16 of the Dewey Decibel podcast, American Libraries magazine looks at the "fake news" phenomenon—its history, how we become susceptible to it, and how we can fight it.

Host and AL Associate Editor Phil Morehart talks with Joanna Burkhardt, fake news expert, professor and director of the University of Rhode Island branch libraries, and author of Teaching Information Literacy Reframed: 50+ Framework-Based Exercises for Creating Information-Literate Learners, about the history of fake news and how and its pernicious presence in today's media landscape.

Next, Dewey Decibel Senior Game Show Correspondent and AL Associate Editor Terra Dankowski quizzes librarians on fake news headlines and talks with them about news literacy at their libraries.

Finally, Morehart talks with Marnie Shure, managing editor of The Onion, about the satirical newspaper's very specific brand of fake news, the role of comedy in truth telling, and how current US politics affects its work.
more...
No comment yet.