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5 Tips for Being an Awesome Little Free Library Patron - BOOK RIOT

5 Tips for Being an Awesome Little Free Library Patron - BOOK RIOT | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
For previous posts in this series, please see The Awesomeness of My Little Free Library and 5 Tips for Running a Little Free Library By now you all have probably realized that I’m pretty much obsessed with my Little Free … Continued
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Stuff That Works: A Funder's Valuable Advice for Public Libraries

Stuff That Works: A Funder's Valuable Advice for Public Libraries | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
In his recent piece on Alberto Ibargüen, David Callahan dubbed the Knight Foundation’s long-serving CEO and president "The Futurist" for good reason. The foundation has been working for years to help key institutions in U.S. society navigate an age of disruption. 

Callahan also noted that Ibargüen wanted to move the foundation beyond its constant experimentation and start doubling down on the stuff that "really worked." If the past year is any indication, Ibargüen has been true to his word. Knight has been active in identifying "stuff that works" across several areas—including libraries, an American institution beloved in theory and embattled in practice. 

In June 2016, the foundation announced the winners of its News Challenge on Libraries, which posed the question, "How might libraries serve 21st-century information needs?" The eclectic mix of grantees offered a range of possible ideas.

Related: What Should 21st Century Libraries Look Like? Here are Fourteen Answers.

Knight has also been keen to connect American libraries with trends worldwide. Earlier this year, the foundation sent a cohort of U.S. librarians to the Next Library Conference, an annual gathering held in Aarhus, Denmark, that brings together global leaders to "spread best practices in library innovation, while helping libraries' capacity to meet new digital age demands."
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AIA/ALA Library Building Awards | American Libraries Magazine

AIA/ALA Library Building Awards | American Libraries Magazine | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

The following libraries are winners of the 2017 Library Building Awards, sponsored by the American Institute of Architects and the American Library Association’s Library Leadership and Management Association. The biennial award recognizes the best in library architecture and design and is open to any architect licensed in the United States. Projects may be located anywhere in the world. The recipients of this year’s award include library designs that reflect the needs of their communities.

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Stuff That Works: A Funder's Valuable Advice for Public Libraries

Stuff That Works: A Funder's Valuable Advice for Public Libraries | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

In his recent piece on Alberto Ibargüen, David Callahan dubbed the Knight Foundation’s long-serving CEO and president "The Futurist" for good reason. The foundation has been working for years to help key institutions in U.S. society navigate an age of disruption. 

Callahan also noted that Ibargüen wanted to move foundation beyond its constant experimentation and start doubling down on the stuff that "really worked." If the past year is any indication, Ibargüen has been true to his word. Knight has been active in identifying "stuff that works" across several areas—including libraries, an American institution that is beloved in theory and embattled in practice. 

In June 2016, the foundation announced the winners of its News Challenge on Libraries, which posed the question, "How might libraries serve 21st-century information needs?" The eclectic mix of grantees offered a range of possible ideas.

Related: What Should 21st Century Libraries Look Like? Here are Fourteen Answers.

Knight has also been keen to connect up American libraries with trends worldwide. Earlier this year, the foundation sent a cohort of U.S. librarians to the Next Library Conference, an annual gathering held in Aarhus, Denmark that brings together global leaders to "spread best practices in library innovation, while helping libraries' capacity to meet new digital age demands."

Laura Sue Wilansky recently posted takeaways from the conference, "Five Lessons for Libraries Looking to Innovate in the 21st Century," on Knight's blog, and I consider them to be important for two reasons.

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A New Type of Library in a Once-Abandoned Colorado Ranch | National Trust for Historic Preservation

A New Type of Library in a Once-Abandoned Colorado Ranch | National Trust for Historic Preservation | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Along the banks of the South Platte River in Colorado, against the backdrop of the Rocky Mountains, an idea is beginning to take shape. It’s a live-in library, a place where books and nature and history come together, and where writers, researchers, and anyone else can bring a suitcase and stay awhile.

It’s called the Rocky Mountain Land Library, and it’s the vision of Jeff Lee and Ann Martin, two longtime employees at the Tattered Cover Book Store in Denver.

It’s an idea that’s been decades in the making, after Lee and Martin traveled to the London Book Fair in the mid-1990s and took a weekend jaunt to Wales, where they stayed at what is now called Gladstone’s Library. It was a cross between a library and a dormitory, and provided them with a perfect jumping-off point for learning about the country they were visiting.

“We fell in love with the place,” Lee says. “And it really clicked. We thought wouldn’t it be great to have a nature library like that—to have a place where you’ve got this direct connection between the books and the subject. And Colorado is blessed with so many wonderful areas that could host a land library. So when we got back, we started a site search that took us across the state.”
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About IFLA Global Vision

The Global Vision discussion is our chance to engage in innovative conversations to unite the library field in the face of ever-increasing globalisation. With six regional workshops already taken place and incredible ideas shared from almost 140 countries, the Global Vision momentum has already begun. Your involvement is crucial in pushing the conversation forward. You can see why the IFLA Global Vision discussion and your role is needed in this video.

See: globalvision.ifla.org
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Spruce Grove Public Library - TumbleBook Cloud - Spruce Grove Public Library

Spruce Grove Public Library - TumbleBook Cloud - Spruce Grove Public Library | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

TumbleBookCloud is an online collection of read-along titles for young adults and adults which features adjustable online text and complete audio narration. It also features National Geographic videos.

Trudy Raymakers's insight:
Coming soon but a great idea for libraries.
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FUTURISTIC LIBRARY IN MEXICO CITY | Eileen Aldis

One of the coolest things to see in Mexico City is a futuristic library called Biblioteca Vasconcelos. It reminds me of something from a sci-fi novel or film. I gasped when I first saw it and it just got more and more incredible the further in I went. The architecture is stunning and unique, like no place I've ever seen before. It was designed by Alberto Kalach and opened in 2007 after three consecutive years of building. There are over half a million books spread out over 38,000 square metres or 409,000 square feet. It's called a 'mega library' because it's actually five libraries melded into one. There are tons of places to sit and work, free wifi, courses and workshops, as well as other community events like free concerts. Don't miss the balconies that give you fantastic views of the Zocalo of Mexico City. If you're a book lover like me or enjoy seeing outstanding architecture, Biblioteca Vasconcelos should not be missed! It's one of the most memorable and favourite places I visited.

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Young African Library Innovators initiative | EIFL

Young African Library Innovators initiative | EIFL | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Nineteen African public librarians will travel to Lithuania and Poland as part of IYALI (the Young African Library Innovators initiative).

IYALI is an initiative of the EIFL Public Library Innovation Programme (EIF-PLIP). The initiative aims to expose emerging public library innovators in Africa to experiences and ideas from other developing and transition economy countries.
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Episode 16: "Fighting Fake News"

In Episode 16 of the Dewey Decibel podcast, American Libraries magazine looks at the "fake news" phenomenon—its history, how we become susceptible to it, and how we can fight it.

Host and AL Associate Editor Phil Morehart talks with Joanna Burkhardt, fake news expert, professor and director of the University of Rhode Island branch libraries, and author of Teaching Information Literacy Reframed: 50+ Framework-Based Exercises for Creating Information-Literate Learners, about the history of fake news and how and its pernicious presence in today's media landscape.

Next, Dewey Decibel Senior Game Show Correspondent and AL Associate Editor Terra Dankowski quizzes librarians on fake news headlines and talks with them about news literacy at their libraries.

Finally, Morehart talks with Marnie Shure, managing editor of The Onion, about the satirical newspaper's very specific brand of fake news, the role of comedy in truth telling, and how current US politics affects its work.
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Clemson University library reinvents itself for today’s students

Clemson University library reinvents itself for today’s students | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Walk through one of the doors embedded in the three-story wall of windows at the front of the building’s sleek white exterior, and you’ll find a Starbucks, a geospatial technology lab, and a digital studio sponsored by Adobe. Open work spaces all around you buzz with researchers collaborating on high-definition displays, computer monitors, and laptops. It might sound like a high-tech incubator in Silicon Valley, but it’s Clemson University’s main library - which had more than 1.4 million visitors in 2016 - as it joins others across the country in adapting to the digital age

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8 innovative technologies to implement at the library of the future

8 innovative technologies to implement at the library of the future | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Librarians should lead the way in technology use among fellow residents and gain more time for the most important activity: helping patrons. Since the main mission of most libraries is to offer equality of access to information for every citizen, then why not be a trendsetter in digital use and implement innovative technologies?

This article presents a range of relevant and useful innovative technologies to implement at the library. We focus on the technology’s applicability for the library and not on the potential budgetary impacts of said technologies.


1. Library mobile apps 

2. Library bookmark apps 

3. Augmented reality app. 

4. Self-service printing, copying, and scanning solutions 

5. 3D printers 

6. Robots 

7. Book delivery drone 

8. Digital interface for printed books

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Pokémon GO teams up with Philadelphia libraries

Pokémon GO teams up with Philadelphia libraries | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

PHILADELPHIA, PA -- Libraries in Philadelphia along with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation have teamed up with Pokémon GO to encourage residents to explore their neighborhoods and their libraries this summer.

There are five participating libraries where users can find and catch Pokémon. The initiative lasts from July10th through August 11th.

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How the best of the future emerged at the remodeled Loussac Library

How the best of the future emerged at the remodeled Loussac Library | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Renovations and reorganization at Loussac Library include a new main entrance and atrium, a relocated cafe and the circulation desk moving to the ground level. (Young Kim / Alaska Dispatch News)

Seven years ago, we were wondering what libraries were for in the internet age. This week, the Z.J. Loussac Library reopened in Midtown Anchorage, answering that question.

The library remodel won't be finished until the fall, but even with some plywood barriers and unfinished walls remaining, the building responds to one of society's most serious problems. It adds community to our use of information.

Previously, the building seemed dark and clogged. The navigational labyrinth was a metaphor for research as we did it back in 1986, when the library was built, and we dug through physical materials for information.

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Libraries and Self-Publishing | Lulu.com

Libraries and Self-Publishing | Lulu.com | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Libraries. A time honored monument to our desire to preserve our past and share our stories. Since people first began setting down their stories on paper, the idea of a library as both a physical place and an institution has been central to how we organize society. The details change over time, but the purpose remains the same: store and make available to the public the knowledge and stories of the past and present.

Some years ago, as the Internet worked its way into our daily lives, there was an undercurrent of fear that the usefulness of libraries might have begun to wane. The information they stored in vast stacks of books could be digitized and presented in the palm of your hand. The questions that could absorb hours of scouring books were answered in moments with a Google search.

Thankfully we know that the Internet won’t directly be replacing libraries any time soon. What the Internet revolution taught us about libraries is that the institution still serves many vital purposes in their communities. From a place to go for a new novel, to a central locale for research, libraries evolved into a hub for information, web access, and a dedicated ‘maker-space’ for do-it-yourself minded people.

Sounds like a place perfect for self-publishing, doesn’t it?

Yet self-publishing and libraries have been slow to connect in many of the ways you would expect. Happily, we can observe that trend changing, as more libraries around the world are finding ways to incorporate self-publishing. The movement to promote community involvement and foster a creative world is one shared by both libraries and self-publishers; this connection alone is reason enough to recognize the need for libraries to embrace self-publishing.
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Thanks to Tech Upgrades, Millennials Love Public Libraries

Thanks to Tech Upgrades, Millennials Love Public Libraries | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

New tech like makerspaces and 3D printing, as well as back-end infrastructure revamps, are playing a role in the next generation flocking to libraries.


If you thought millennials were going to be the end of public libraries, think again.
A new study by the Pew Charitable Trust finds that the millennial generation is more likely than any other to use public libraries. According to the study, 53 percent of millennials said they had used a public library or bookmobile in the last 12 months, compared to just 45 percent of Gen Xers and 43 percent of baby boomers.

How Libraries Are Becoming Tech Hubs

While books are a draw for the younger generation, technology seems to be a major factor in their decision to frequent the local library and peruse the shelves. One harbinger of this is that more than 40 percent of millennials said they had used a library website in the past 12 months, compared to just 24 percent of baby boomers, according to Pew’s most recent report.

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Technology Trends Reshape Today’s Libraries

Technology Trends Reshape Today’s Libraries | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Modernizing learning in the 21st-century school can start in the library.

by Wendy McMahonTwitter
Wendy McMahon is a freelance writer and general tech geek who has been writing about technology for over 10 years. Follower her on Twitter at @wendymcmahon.
School libraries across the country are changing drastically to accommodate the new tech-infused needs of students.

Driving these changes are trends like makerspaces, flexible learning commons and the flexible furniture needed to accommodate it all, reports Technavio.

In these new future-focused libraries, students sip lattes while they do research in café-styled spaces, collaborate on group projects in glass-walled study rooms and move flexible furniture to suit their group and project needs.

Students also use green screens, conferencing technology, virtual reality tools and a host of other technology tools designed to support collaboration, creativity, innovation and more.

Why Are Libraries the Perfect Flexible Learning Spaces?

Kecia Ray, past president of the ISTE board of directors and executive director for the Center for Digital Education, explains that when support for modern education trends begins in school libraries — as opposed to individual classrooms — it ensures access to the latest technology and learning methods for all students and educators.
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The Library of the Future

The New Taipei City Library is a hub of innovation and learning. Spanning floors and generations as well as offering a unique reading and learning experience for people from all walks of life, this library of the future has something for everyone!

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New Yorkers Can Now Stream 30,000 Free Movies, Including the Entire Criterion Collection, with Their Library Cards

New Yorkers Can Now Stream 30,000 Free Movies, Including the Entire Criterion Collection, with Their Library Cards | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Anyone who has a New York Public Library or Brooklyn Public Library card can now watch more than 30,000 feature films, documentaries, foreign-language films and training videos.
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Virtual reality makes its way to libraries

San Jose Public Libraries received a great that let them receive the Oculus Rift headset and the necessary computers to open up virtual reality to patrons. The grant is a partnership between the California Library Association and Oculus VR.
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What Happened to Google's Effort to Scan Millions of University Library Books? - EdSurge News

What Happened to Google's Effort to Scan Millions of University Library Books? - EdSurge News | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
It was a crazy idea: Take the bulk of the world’s books, scan them, and create a monumental digital library for all to access. That’s what Google dreamed of doing when it embarked on its ambitious book-digitizing project in 2002. It got part of the way there, digitizing at least 25 million books from major university libraries.

But the promised library of everything hasn’t come into being. An epic legal battle between authors and publishers and the Internet giant over alleged copyright violations dragged on for years. A settlement that would have created a Book Rights Registry and made it possible to access the Google Books corpus through public-library terminals ultimately died, rejected by a federal judge in 2011. And though the same judge ultimately dismissed the case in 2013, handing Google a victory that allowed it to keep on scanning, the dream of easy and full access to all those works remains just that.

Earlier this year, an article in the Atlantic lamented the dismantling of what it called “the greatest humanistic project of our time.” The author, a programmer named James Somer, put it like this: “Somewhere at Google there is a database containing 25 million books and nobody is allowed to read them.”

That assessment may be technically true, but many librarians and scholars see the legacy of the project differently. In fact, academics now regularly tap into the reservoir of digitized material that Google helped create, using it as a dataset they can query, even if they can’t consume full texts. It’s a pillar of the humanities’ growing engagement with Big Data.

It’s also a handy resource for other kinds of research. “It’s hard to imagine going through a day doing the work we academics do without touching something that wouldn’t be there without Google Book Search,” says Paul Courant, now interim provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at the University of Michigan. Courant was also interim provost at Michigan when Google first approached the university about scanning the contents of its library—a proposal that left him both “ecstatic and skeptical,” he says.
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What’s this library book doing in my National Park?

What’s this library book doing in my National Park? | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

In early June, I was walking a trail in Land’s End in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, when I came upon a children’s book called The Fox Wish, by Kimiko Aman. Each page was a mounted panel, installed just a few feet away from the next, like storytime breadcrumbs.

It was a delightful book about a fox who steals a little girl’s jump rope, but it got me wondering: What’s a children’s book doing in this National Park?

Well, did you ever hear that opposites attract?

To find out more, I talk to Michele Gee, Chief of Education and Interpretation at the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, a Bay Area National Park. She tells me that last year, when the National Parks Service celebrated it’s centennial, they decided to really focus on a problem they’d been working on for years.

The National Parks reach out

“We have a certain population that loves their National Parks, visits regularly, but that doesn't reflect the diversity of our nation or the diversity of the Bay Area,” says Gee. “Lower income or people of color aren’t being drawn to the National Parks and don't have the access. They both don’t know about it, don't know it exists, but also don't necessarily feel welcome to come.

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Penn State Libraries Launch Short Story Dispensers

Penn State Libraries Launch Short Story Dispensers | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Students returning to Pennsylvania State University (PSU) this fall will find four new short story dispensing kiosks installed at libraries across campus, along with a website for submitting their own original stories for distribution through the kiosks. Developed by Short Édition  of Grenoble, France, the kiosks’ simple interface allows users to select a story that takes one, three, or five minutes to read. Their story is then printed out on a narrow piece of sustainably-sourced thermal paper the size of a large receipt.
“Libraries are a pretty logical fit for this,” Joseph A. Salem, associate dean for learning, undergraduate services and Commonwealth Campus Libraries for Penn State, told LJ, noting that part of the goal is to foster creative expression on campus and in the broader community. In addition to units at Penn State’s Paterno, Pattee, Architecture, and Physical and Mathematical Sciences Libraries, a fifth kiosk is installed at the public Schlow Centre Region Library in downtown State College

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BPL - Press Room – Bibliocycle

BPL - Press Room – Bibliocycle | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

The BPL Bibliocycle, a bike and book trailer partnership with Boston Bikes, returns to the streets of Boston in its second season, visiting street fairs, markets, and community events to meet people where they are and deliver library services on-the-go. The first stop for the Bibliocycle will be on Saturday, May 16, at the Kite and Bike Festival in Franklin Park.
“This program provides an abundance of educational opportunities for community members at a variety of local cultural events. I encourage Bostonians to utilize this great resource and learn more about the free services our library system offers,” said Mayor Martin J. Walsh. (more…)

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Libraries Out Loud | A Literacy Beyond Words

Here in Kansas City we have some of the best libraries in the country. Continue our 'Libraries Out Loud' series here with Episode 2 on literacy.

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Story time at Kingsbridge library is now a drag ... in a good way

Story time at Kingsbridge library is now a drag ... in a good way | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
A sea of paper crowns covered in star stickers, a baby running around wearing a shirt with the word “feminist” on the front, and a drag queen in a sparkly dress set a vibrant scene for Kingsbridge Library’s first ever Drag Queen Story Hour.

The event took place July 13, beginning with an enthusiastic musical rendition of “The Itsy Bitsy Spider” before Angel Elektra, a drag queen from Yonkers, sat children and parents down to read a series of books ranging from “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” by Eric Carle to “It’s Okay To Be Different” by Todd Parr.

Drag Queen Story Hour took the country by storm in 2015 when writer Michelle Tea and literary nonprofit Radar Productions held events in San Francisco where drag queens — male performers acting and dressing as women — read to children in bookstores, libraries and schools. The aim of the event, according to organizers, is to promote children’s imaginations, celebrate diversity, and show them that gender identity is determined on a personal basis.  
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