Innovations in Healthcare
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Valkee Light Headset Improves Motor Reaction Time in Hockey Players

Valkee Light Headset Improves Motor Reaction Time in Hockey Players | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it
Valkee, the Finnish maker of the recently released light headset for seasonal affective disorder, has announced positive results of a study that light shone on the brain using their music player-like device has on reaction time.

Verve Research, Finland was hired to conduct the trial on members of the Finnish national hockey league. What they discovered was that these hockey players, already professionals in a very fast sport, improved their reaction times by around 20%, compared to the placebo group, after wearing the Valkee device for 12 minutes each morning for three weeks.

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Innovations in Healthcare
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Digital health funding up 45% in 2012

Digital health funding up 45% in 2012 | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Last year was a banner year for digital health, and in 2013, it can only get better as the trends in healthcare are increasingly digital-based. In 2012, tech companies poured $1.4 billion into digital health companies, a 45 percent increase from 2011, according to a recent year-end report from healthcare technology accelerator Rock Health.  

Fifty-six percent more deals occurred in 2012 for digital health than in 2011. Rock Health's report indicates that compared to the declining investment in traditional healthcare, software and digital health funding is on its way up. Another impressive number is 134, the number of digital health companies that each raised $2 million in 2012.

Personal health tools and tracking, health consumer engagement, EMR/EHR and hospital administration all are moving toward digital, comprising one-third of all digital deals made in 2012

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Inter-Growth's curator insight, January 31, 2013 12:48 PM

Though challenges remain, the trend will continue to be an increase in EMR by providers and EHR by providers and consumers.

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A $280 billion healthcare problem ripe for technology innovation and predictive analytics

A $280 billion healthcare problem ripe for technology innovation and predictive analytics | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Behavioral health is a complicated and expensive issue in U.S healthcare today. It's also a field that is underfunded and ripe for technology-led innovation.


Mental health and substance abuse treatment are on track to be a $280 billion problem by 2020. This is the tip of the iceberg. If you include untreated individuals and people with developmental disabilities, age-related conditions and so on, the magnitude of the problem is much higher. rebuiding How to rebuild your career after a layoff There is life after the layoff. Take these 6 steps to engineer your own comeback. Read Now Behavioral health (BH) issues — which include substance abuse in addition to mental health conditions — correlate with increased mortality, unemployment and homelessness, among other things. In response to the growing seriousness of the issue, the Senate health committee has announced the Mental Health Reform Act of 2016. However, BH is underfunded given the scale of the problem and is underequipped in terms of treatment infrastructure. The costs, relative to the size of the affected population, are disproportionately high: Consulting firm McKinsey estimates that this group represents 20% of the population but accounts for 35% of the total healthcare expenditure in the country today. Using data to address risks and costs As with accountable care models in population health management (PHM), the key to reining in BH costs is to understand population health risks and intervene with preventive care models that reduce costs while improving the quality of care. A couple of partnership models provide examples of how technology innovators and care providers are collaborating to address the problem. One involves the South Florida Behavioral Health Network (SFBHN) and ODH Inc.; the other involves Quest Diagnostics and UC San Francisco (UCSF). Let's take a look at both of them. The South Florida Behavioral Health Network (SFBHN) and ODH Inc. The BH sector is not well prepared to deal with taking on risk, says John Dow, CEO of SFBHN, a nonprofit that deals with the prevention and treatment of behavioral health disorders at the community level. To begin with, unlike in a medical field such as oncology, there are no registries with longitudinal data on BH patients. Additional complications include confidentiality and sensitivity to data that might hurt individuals if handled improperly (such as data on criminal history and incarceration). Aggregating the data can be a significant challenge that requires collaboration among stakeholders. To bring technology innovation to address the problem, SFBHN has partnered with ODH Inc., an offshoot of Japanese pharma company Otsuka that has developed Mentrics, a PHM platform for behavioral health. The key aspect of the platform is a risk-scoring algorithm that identifies high-risk patients for targeted intervention by using predictive analytics on medical records, behavioral health data and data on the individual’s justice issues. The latter, a major element of the program, is an outcome of the White House Data Driven Justice (DDJ) initiative that focuses on reducing incarceration and recidivism within the population. SFBHN, which has accumulated five to six years of behavioral health data, works with local hospitals to combine this data with medical records to identify and target at-risk individuals. SFBHN is careful about the confidentiality of the data and takes extreme care to comply with the government's CFR 42 regulations on the same. Quest Diagnostics and UC San Francisco (UCSF) A unique partnership between lab test leader Quest Diagnostics and the academic medical center at UCSF focuses on dementia, a $215 billion cost that is bigger than cancer and heart disease and is set to increase significantly due to the aging population. stethoscope tablet healthcare stethoscope tablet healthcare data Using a population health approach, Quest leverages its vast clinical database of over 20 billion lab test records for early detection of dementia using an integrated care pathway for diagnosis and treatment of dementia developed at UCSF that focuses on early detection and treatment. Using technology innovation, the dementia care protocol starts with a five-minute cognitive assessment test named CogniSense that is administered through an iPad application during a physician office visit. Quest’s Quanum platform, an integrated suite of healthcare information technology and predictive analytics tools, analyzes the data from the test along with other patient medical data to help primary care physicians identify patients with early onset of memory loss and dementia. Quest estimates that early identification and treatment of reversible causes of dementia saves $50,000 to $70,000 in costs by delaying admissions to assisted living centers. The rise of behavioral health startups BH is a complex and expensive issue in U.S healthcare today. This is also a sector that is ripe and ready for technology-led innovation. And the startup ecosystem is rising to meet the challenge. There are over 200 behavioral health startups today, many of them funded by venture capital. Many of these startups are attracting the attention of health insurance companies looking to rein in the costs of behavioral health in their member populations by buying innovation from the market. Some of the early providers of behavioral health solutions have already been acquired by larger insurance companies, while others have received venture capital from the investing arms of health plans. However, as in the case of digital health, many of these solutions are not based on clinical evidence and are not FDA-approved, which limits their use in clinical settings. The lack of federal funding for behavioral health may raise questions about the business viability for many of these startups. The shortage of trained mental health professionals, especially in rural areas, can be a barrier to scale as well. The recent announcement by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that $44.5 million will be allocated to grow the pool of behavioral health professionals is very timely. At the same time, behavioral health is one of those fields with a double bottom line — in other words, the intended benefits are financial and social. As support for funding for behavioral health programs gathers momentum through legislation, and as behavioral health solutions mature with data, predictive models that accurately identify early onset of dementia and other conditions can have a significant impact on reducing treatment costs. As John Dow of SFBHN says, everyone will then be able to reap the benefits, however you define them

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Can Artificial Intelligence Reduce "Notification Overload” for Clinicians?

Can Artificial Intelligence Reduce "Notification Overload” for Clinicians? | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it
How do we overcome “notification overload” for clinicians? We need tools that can automate the interdisciplinary workflows that reduce notification burden.
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Continuous monitoring tools could save hospitals $20,000 per bed, report says

Continuous monitoring tools could save hospitals $20,000 per bed, report says | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Contact-free continuous monitoring, a platform that taps into sensors to measure patients vital signs and other metrics, hold the promise to save health systems $15 billion a year. That’s according to a new peer-reviewed paper published in Critical Care Medicine. CFCM is used to monitor heartbeat, respiratory rate, ulcers and patient motion. The technology's components include sensors placed under a patient's mattress or in a chair, bedside monitor, central display station and in handheld devices. The sensors measure vibration and calculate motion, heartbeats per minute and breaths per minute, which detect any changes from regular patterns. If a patient's status changes, the platform alerts nurses through large screens set up in conspicuous locations, as well as handheld devices. Researchers from Harvard School of Medicine in a new Frost and Sullivan report entitled "Finding Top-Line Opportunities in a Bottom-Line Healthcare Market" claimed each hospital bed monitored with the EarlySense CFCM approach enables hospitals to achieve a cost savings nearing $20,000. The cost savings are attributed to clinical outcome improvements published by hospitals implementing CFCM. Evidence suggests the technology can assist clinicians in earlier detection of patient deterioration, helping to reduce patient length of stay, minimize use of intensive care units, reduce falls and pressure ulcers and avoid cardiac and respiratory arrests. The $15 billion figure was arrived at by extending the savings to all 750,000 relevant beds in the U.S. hospital system. The estimate does not take into account those patients in beds outside the hospital setting. Clinical data also estimates that use of EarlySense has the annual potential to reduce patient falls by 301,809; reduce pressure ulcers by over 1 million; slash ICU days by about 1.7 million; eliminate more than 259,000 "Code Blue" events; and avoid close to 208,000 deaths. "The healthcare industry is constantly working to improve efficiency," said Charlie Whelan, Frost and Sullivan's Transformational Health North America consulting director, in a statement. "These studies show that continuous monitoring presents a unique opportunity to create both top and bottom line benefits, while simultaneously improving quality of care." Twitter: @JELagasse

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Mental health and general practice: intertwined futures

Mental health and general practice: intertwined futures | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Many in the mental health sector had been eagerly awaiting NHS England’s implementation plan proposing how the Mental Health Taskforce report, The five year forward view for mental health, will be put into practice. If successful, the significance of the plan could extend well beyond the mental health sector: some of the most important opportunities relate to the way in which people with mental health problems could be supported in general acute hospitals and in general practice. One of the main proposals in the Taskforce report is that mental health care should be integrated more closely with the rest of the health system, so that mental and physical health are considered together. The King’s Fund strongly endorses this principle, and we are working to support it through our ongoing research projects and learning network. The implementation plan includes some welcome detail on how integrating mental and physical health care can be achieved in secondary care, for example, through expanding liaison mental health services in general acute hospitals, and by improving mental health support during the perinatal period. For the first few years, these approaches will be partially paid for from the Sustainability and Transformation Fund. However, the vision for integration in primary care is less well-articulated. Our report, Bringing together physical and mental health, argued that some of the biggest opportunities for integration lie in developing new approaches towards mental health care in general practice settings, as part of wider moves to redesign models for primary and out-of-hospital care – a recommendation also made by our research on pressures in general practice. Improving this aspect of care is particularly important given that 90 per cent of adults with mental health problems are supported in general practice. The implementation plan does include some important measures in general practice. The headline goal is for 3,000 new mental health therapists located in GP practices, as previously announced in the General practice forward view. The plan states that part of the rationale for this is to help relieve the pressure on general practice resulting from unmet mental health needs – something that is certainly required. And while this extra capacity may help, I have two concerns. The first is that co-location does not necessarily equal integration – an observation that is often made but still worth repeating. Our research on specialists working in out-of-hospital settings shows that ‘drag and drop’ approaches are not the most powerful way of bringing about change. Mental health professionals working in general practice will be in a stronger position to improve the quality of care and alleviate pressures if they are unambiguously part of the primary care team, with an active exchange of information, knowledge and skills between mental health workers, GPs and other team members. Without this, there is a risk of missing an important opportunity to increase the ability and confidence of primary care professionals to both manage mental health issues within general practice, and ensure that the physical health needs of people with mental health problems are met. The second consideration is getting the training and supervision arrangements right for mental health therapists working in general practice. The implementation plan explains that much of the new capacity will be targeted at people with co-existing mental and physical health conditions or other complex, overlapping symptoms. Working in this area takes a high level of skill, and it is not clear whether the ‘top-up training’ envisaged in the plan will be sufficient. The most evidence-based models for working with these patient groups tend to involve ongoing supervision from mental health specialists with specific expertise in the area. A key task for the ‘early implementer’ sites described in the plan will be testing different approaches to this. General practice is entering a period of change, in part triggered by the intense pressures many GPs are encountering. The proposals in the General practice forward view build on the ongoing trend of GPs coming together with other professionals, in practice groups, federations and the new care models being tested in the vanguard sites. Given the high levels of unmet or poorly met mental health care need among people using GP services – and the impact of this on both patients and staff – it is important that new approaches towards joining up primary care and mental health care are integral to efforts to strengthen general practice. The five year forward view for mental health implementation plan places responsibility for bringing about many of the planned changes at the feet of those leading the 44 sustainability and transformation plan (STP) footprints across England. The plan is right to identify STPs as a critical lever for change – but there is a clear danger that both general practice and mental health care are overshadowed as STPs focus on the challenges facing the acute hospital sector. While these challenges cannot be ignored, STPs also need to serve as a stimulus for transformation of services outside hospital. And in bringing about this transformation, we need to think about the future of general practice and the future of mental health care as being part of the same conversation. Find out more about our learning network on integrating physical and mental health care Perspectives from Chris Naylor and patient representative Angela Camber on bringing together physical and mental health

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IBM Launches Lab-on-a-Chip Technology to detect Cancer

IBM Launches Lab-on-a-Chip Technology to detect Cancer | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

IBM Research teams up with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai to develop Lab-on-a-Chip technology to detect cancer. IBM announced that its research scientists have developed a new lab-on-a-chip technology that can separate biological particles at the nanoscale to enable doctors to detect diseases such as cancer even before symptoms appear. IBM is working with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai to perfect the technology and to test it on prostate cancer, which is the most common cancer in men in the U.S. The collaboration uses a technology developed at IBM called nanoscale deterministic lateral displacement, or nano-DLD, to separate the biological particles at nanoscale. “We expect that this device will allow us to identify cancer in patients that still have no symptoms,” said Gustavo Stolovitzky, program director for IBM Translational Systems Biology and Nanobiotechnology at IBM Research, in an IBM video on the technology.


The IBM Lab-on-a-Chip would work like a home pregnancy test. “Imagine this scenario: Annual physical examinations are supplemented by an affordable home diagnostic chip, allowing you to regularly monitor your baseline health with just a simple urine sample,” said Fiona Doherty, a content specialist at IBM Research, in a blog post. “Though outwardly you appear to be in good health, the device reveals a fluctuation in your biomarker profile, indicating the possible emergence of early stage cancer development or presence of a virus.” IBM began its nano-DLD efforts two years ago when a cross-disciplinary team at IBM Research led by Dr. Joshua Smith, research scientist and master inventor, and Stolovitzky began working on retooling silicon technology and using it to separate nanoscale-sized particles like the elements of viruses and cancers, Doherty said. The IBM Research team published details of its breakthrough this week in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. “All the processes that you would have to do to analyze a disease and get a diagnosis, in theory you could shrink that down to a microchip and do the same analysis that you would have to do with a whole lab in a hospital or a special company,” said Ben Wunsch, surface chemist at IBM Research, in the IBM video. “You could do it right on a chip.” IBM is pioneering the detection of exosomes in the process of liquid biopsies. The company is trying to detect those exosomes in a fast and cheap way, Stolovitzky said. “Exosomes are little vesicles on the order of 20 to 100 nanometers, which is the size that our devices can handle,” he said in the video. “They are very, very small – 100,000 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair.” A “liquid biopsy” can be obtained from urine or saliva samples. Then tiny particles need to be separated for downstream detection of a disease, Doherty said. “Being able to separate particles in this size range means that we can target a lot of things that cause disease,” said Stacy Gifford, an IBM Research biochemist, in the IBM video. “So exosomes are one thing. They’re a good marker for a lot of different cancers and then there are other things like viruses and proteins and protein complexes that also play a really important role in not just disease, but healthy states as well." This is where the nano-DLD technology comes in. Using nano-DLD, a liquid sample passes in a continuous flow through a silicon chip designed with an asymmetric pillar array. This array allows the system to sort the microscopic particles, separating them by size down to tens of nanometers resolution, Doherty said. “The ability to sort and enrich biomarkers at the nanoscale in chip-based technologies opens the door to understanding diseases such as cancer as well as viruses like the flu or Zika,” Stolovitzky said in a statement. “Our lab-on-a-chip device could offer a simple, noninvasive and affordable option to potentially detect and monitor a disease even at its earliest stages, long before physical symptoms manifest. This extra amount of time allows physicians to make more informed decisions and when the prognosis for treatment options is most positive.” Dr. Carlos Cordon-Cardo, professor and chairman for the Mount Sinai Health System Department of Pathology, is optimistic about the new technology and the liquid biopsy because it enables physicians to look at illnesses in new ways and treat patients earlier in their battle with diseases like cancer. “If we can identify not only one molecule or one protein or one DNA, but if we can start looking at the disease at the multidimensional level, we can get inside of the disease and look at it from inside out,” he said.

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The 10 Most Innovative Health Technologies Saving Millions In The Developing World

The 10 Most Innovative Health Technologies Saving Millions In The Developing World | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it
There are striking differences in the general social, economic or political background of the developed and developing country-groups, and developing countries are in dire need for creative and
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Report: Healthcare Analytics Market Expected to Reach $43B by 2024 -

Report: Healthcare Analytics Market Expected to Reach $43B by 2024 - | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it
The global healthcare analytics market is expected to reach $42.8 billion by 2024, according to a new report by Grand View Research, Inc.
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The Power of Healthcare Storytelling | Klick Health

The Power of Healthcare Storytelling | Klick Health | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it
Big data has revealed the basic emotional arcs of stories, reinforcing what we’ve known all along—that great marketing is great storytelling. Let'
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Cutting the cord – connectivity without batteries or chargers » Innovative Consumer Product Development

Cutting the cord – connectivity without batteries or chargers » Innovative Consumer Product Development | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

The moment that a user needs to remember to recharge the batteries on their device is the time that they are most likely to stop using it. This adage is likely to become a thing of the past though. Whilst battery performance has remained disappointingly stationary over the last decade the energy requirements of electronics has been steadily dropping at the same time that energy harvesting techniques have been improving.

We’re excited about the potential for all sorts of connected product development, from medical devices, fitness technology development and other wearable technology.

To show the potential application of such an approach we have developed a proof of principle demonstrator for a Bluetooth Smart enabled insulin pen that has no batteries. You can read more about our Kiko concept here.  We harvest enough energy from the removal of the cap to power both the detection of the insulin dose and transmission of the data to a smart phone. All this is done whilst adhering to the strict limits of force imposed upon medical devices so that they can be used by people with a weak grip or poor dexterity. The only thing about the prototype that isn’t implemented is the needle itself.

There are a lot of products that have caps or lids and the ability to seamlessly introduce connectivity without altering the normal use of a product removes one of the most significant downsides of introducing electronics to a previously dumb product. From the users perspective they have a device that works in precisely the way that they are familiar with and they get the added benefit of feedback and digital services that can be created once a product is connected.

What will be next for energy harvesting?

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Medicine's Manhattan Project: Can The World's Richest Doctor Fix Health Care?

Medicine's Manhattan Project: Can The World's Richest Doctor Fix Health Care? | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

On a typically perfect summer day in Los Angeles, Patrick Soon-Shiong, the richest doctor in the history of the world, is bunkered inside his clandestine headquarters (nestled behind a security gate so unobtrusive that Uber cars consistently miss it), ready to show around a kindred spirit. T. Denny Sanford, who made a $2.8 billion fortune selling high-interest-rate MasterCards to people with bad credit scores, is now in philanthropy mode, giving away most of his fortune to children’s charities and hospitals. And he’s come to see what’s been touted as the future of medicine.

Soon-Shiong, 62, has a lot to show. First, he walks him through a mock-up of a futuristic hospital room: There’s a patch that measures a patient’s heart rate, temperature and blood pressure, and a 3-inch white cube, called an HBox, connecting every device to a computer network. He shows off a darkened room covered in computer screens: a control center from which a handful of doctors can monitor hundreds of patients, even when those patients are at home. And finally he calls up several computer programs that make sure doctors know, up to the latest scientific-journal article, the best treatment available. It’s a sweeping assemblage of data-driven toys–fueled by $1.3 billion worth of furtive acquisitions, almost entirely using Soon-Shiong’s own money.

 

This dizzying demonstration wows Sanford, who seems extra-rumpled next to Soon-Shiong, in his crisp tailored blue shirt and suit pants, which he fills sleekly (he owns part of the Lakers and plays hoops regularly on an indoor court at his house). “I think it’s exactly what we need in this world,” Sanford says. “I also have a hospital group. I think we’re at 40 hospitals and 150 clinics, but costs are just going crazy, and the lack of communication between these organizations is just paramount to correct.” Soon-Shiong jumps in for the close: “The hospitals aren’t organized, funded or even have the skill sets to create this kind of communications infrastructure. Frankly, the government should have done it.”

As evidenced by the incompetent ObamaCare rollout, perhaps it’s better that Soon-Shiong did, and Sanford is taking whatever this doctor prescribes. They shake hands eagerly on a deal to deploy the technology at a children’s hospital in Phoenix, Ariz.

Even after the demonstration, though, exactly what Sanford is buying remains unclear. As seen over Soon-Shiong’s shoulder, the demos look fantastic. But no outsider I spoke to had actually laid hands on all the pieces of the technology. There is no real business plan. No pricing model. All they have is Soon-Shiong’s word, which is a tricky thing. While he’s undeniably brilliant, Soon-Shiong is equally undeniably a blowhard, a view shared widely across the medical spectrum (his Twitter TWTR +4.54% handle:
@solvehealthcare). “The marketing is three years ahead of the engineering,” says John Halamka, one of the first people to ever have his genome sequenced and the chief information officer of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. “What works on paper, what works in the lab and what works in a complex academic medical center are very different things.” He later adds: “Patrick is a showman of sorts, and for him to claim,  ’I have solved the problems that everyone else over the last 20 years hasn’t been able to solve…’ ”

It bothers me, too. Soon-Shiong’s sparkling headquarters, a futuristic amalgamation of metal and glass where some of his 800 employees scurry about, sits in L.A.’s Culver City neighborhood, which has birthed dozens of Hollywood fantasies, including The Wizard of Oz. Accordingly, I’ve spent the past ten months trying to pull back the curtain. Soon-Shiong has allowed me an exclusive, detailed look inside his efforts–the Manhattan Project of medicine–just as he was closing the deal that will see them put into action for the first time at Providence Health & Services, a 34-hospital, not-for-profit Catholic health ministry in Oregon, California, Alaska, Washington State and Montana. And I talked to dozens of outsiders.

What was universal: the scope of Soon-Shiong’s undertaking. “When we went to see him and got a look at what they’re planning to implement, we were dazzled,” says Gillies McKenna, head of the department of oncology at Oxford University. “If you can make this work, and I agree it will be very difficult, he’s looking at an exponential increase in the amount of data we can base decisions on.” Soon-Shiong explains it this way: “We will have more information at our fingertips than we ever had in the history of mankind–every day. Not once a month, a week. Every day.” Such omniscience has the potential to reverse the perverse incentives–which emphasize treatments rather than results–driving America’s annual health costs past $3 trillion. It could also cure most of what ails us, even cancer.

 

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Four-year 100,000 genomes project, run by Genomics England... well underway

Four-year 100,000 genomes project, run by Genomics England... well underway | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

A project aiming to revolutionise medicine by unlocking the secrets of DNA is under way in centres across England.

Prime Minister David Cameron has said it "will see the UK lead the world in genetic research within years".

The first genetic codes of people with cancer or rare diseases, out of a target of 100,000, have been sequenced.

Experts believe it will lead to targeted therapies and could make chemotherapy "a thing of the past".

They argue that understanding DNA will soon play a role in every aspect of medicine from cancer to cardiology.

Tumours are caused by mutations in DNA which lead to abnormal cells growing unchecked.

Advances in genetics have shown that breast cancer is not one disease but at least 10 - each with a different cause, life expectancy and needing a different treatment.

Targeted drugs exist such as Herceptin, which is given only if a patient's breast tumour has a certain mutation.

The four-year 100,000 genomes project, run by Genomics England, which was set up for the purpose, is aiming to make such breakthroughs on a massive scale.

 

Pilots have been set up at centres across England - including sites in Newcastle, Cambridge and London - and the first genome was sequenced on 30 May.

The project has passed the 100 mark, with the aim of reaching 1,000 by the end of the year and 10,000 by the end of 2015.

Just one human genome contains more than three billion base pairs - the building blocks of DNA.

It is by looking for subtle differences between genetic codes which lead to disease that researchers believe can fuel the next big breakthroughs.

The genome of a patient's tumour will be scoured for differences with the genetic code of their healthy tissue.

People with rare diseases, usually children, will have their DNA compared with that of close relatives.

University scientists and a drug companies will be allowed to access the data for their research.

 

Fifteen thousand families with rare diseases will take part in the project.

Edward Sherley-Price has first-hand experience of just how little is known about some conditions.

His 11-year-old daughter Alysia has regular seizures.

She was diagnosed with a developmental delay before her second birthday, but the cause was unknown.

It took until 2013 for genetic testing to discover what was wrong - a rare genetic mutation known as STXBP1.

The family say getting a diagnosis has given them a renewed sense of optimism.

The 100,000 Genomes Project could help people like Alysia by identifying a specific mutation, which lead to taking part in future drug trials.

Sir John Chisholm, executive chair of Genomics England, said: "In Britain we were the discoverers of the structure of DNA, we were huge players in the human genome project and now the time has come for the next major step forward.

"One hundred thousand sequences is a very large step; it's a huge commitment."

Genomics England will be based at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Cambridge, which is already a world-recognised centre of genetics research.

'Every bit of medicine'

Prof Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust, said: "I can see a future where genetics is going to come into every bit of medicine from cardiology to oncology to infectious diseases."

He said there were already targeted therapies for some breast, lung, bowel and blood cancers.

"Twenty years from now there's going to be a plethora of those, we will have a series of mutations which academics and industry will have developed therapies for, which will be targeted at you and specific for that cancer."

He said chemotherapy, which attacks all dividing cells in the body, would be replaced with such therapies.

"We will look back in 20 years' time and think of blockbuster chemotherapy [as] a thing of the past and we'll think 'Gosh, what an era that was'."

 

David Cameron has announced a series of investments across government, industry and charities totalling £300m.

He said: "I am determined to do all I can to support the health and scientific sector to unlock the power of DNA, turning an important scientific breakthrough into something that will help deliver better tests, better drugs and above all better care for patients.

"I believe we will be able to transform how devastating diseases are diagnosed and treated in the NHS and across the world."

NHS England chief executive Simon Stevens said: "The NHS is now set to become one of the world's 'go-to' health services for the development of innovative genomic tests and patient treatments, building on our long track record as the nation that brought humanity antibiotics, vaccines, modern nursing, hip replacements, IVF, CT scanners, and breakthrough discoveries from the circulation of blood to the existence of DNA."

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Artificial Pancreas Approved by FDA Marks a Global First

Artificial Pancreas Approved by FDA Marks a Global First | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Medtronic Plc will bring to market the world’s first artificial pancreas, after U.S. regulators cleared the device for diabetics to automatically monitor blood sugar and supply insulin, replicating what a healthy version of the organ does on its own.


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Major news in #diabetes
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Buyers Guide: A close look at 8 population health platforms

Buyers Guide: A close look at 8 population health platforms | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it


Healthcare IT News reviews software designed to provide actionable intelligence from Caradigm, Enli, Forward Health, Medicision, Medicity, Transcend Insights, WellCentive and ZeOmega.



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MIT engineers human cells to store ‘memories’ in DNA | #Research 

MIT engineers human cells to store ‘memories’ in DNA | #Research  | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it


Score another win for CRISPR. Scientists at MIT are using the ever-intriguing genome-editing system to engineer human cells capable of recording and reporting the intensity and duration past events. The analog memory storage system builds upon past work developed by scientists that programmed cells to flip DNA sections when events – like exposure to specific chemicals – occurred. What sets the new research apart, however, is the addition exposure duration and intensity to the cell-reported information. The older research has also largely been relegated to bacteria. Moving the technology to human cells means, among other things, a potential method for studying the ways in which cellular events like gene regulation impact disease, according to MIT associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and of biological engineering, Timothy Lu. The researchers are also able to get a bit fancier with things, with cells capable of recording multiple different input sources – in the case of this demo, doxycycline (an antibiotic and the lactose-like molecule, IPTG. All of the information allows for a much closure study on the impact of infections and diseases like cancer. It could also potentially be used to follow the role of specialized cells during development from an embryo to full-grown adult



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Gust MEES's curator insight, August 18, 2016 2:30 PM

Score another win for CRISPR. Scientists at MIT are using the ever-intriguing genome-editing system to engineer human cells capable of recording and reporting...

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=MIT

 

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The healing power of AI

The healing power of AI | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence originally aspired to replace doctors. Researchers imagined robots that could ask you questions, run the answers through an algorithm..
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New “Neural Dust” sensor could be implanted in the body

University of California, Berkeley engineers have built the first dust-sized, wireless sensors that can be implanted in the body, bringing closer the day when a Fitbit-like device could monitor internal nerves, muscles or organs in real time.

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NIH Precision Medicine Effort to Explore New tools for integrating patient data with information about contextual factors that influence health outcomes

NIH Precision Medicine Effort to Explore New tools for integrating patient data with information about contextual factors that influence health outcomes | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

The National Institutes of Health is ponying up $31 million over five years to launch a new research program to explore the potential for precision medicine to help reduce health disparities. NIH’s effort includes the development of new tools and analytic methods for integrating patient data with information about contextual factors at the community and population levels that influence health outcomes, such as economic, social and political conditions. Regina James, director of clinical and health services research at the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD), says new tools and analytics, and data integration are one of five priority areas that so-called Transdisciplinary Collaborative Centers (TCCs) will focus on as part of their work. “We’re hoping that the TCCs will bring to bear their knowledge and expertise to begin to integrate the social contextual factors that go beyond biologic and clinical markers to really make it relevant for populations that are underserved,” says James. At the same time, she adds that another priority research area for NIMHD’s precision medicine initiative is the development of pharmacogenomic tools to identify critical biomarkers for disease progression and drug responses in diverse populations. TCC cooperative agreement awards, each providing as much as $1.5 million in direct costs annually over five years (plus applicable indirect costs), have been made to three academic institutions: Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., and Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. The TCCs will focus on at least one priority research area to address one or more documented health disparities for populations, which include Blacks/African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Each academic center will support two to three multidisciplinary research projects examining complementary aspects of precision medicine, focusing on interactions between biological, behavioral and contextual predictors of disease vulnerability, resilience and response to therapies in patients from disadvantaged communities. Unfortunately, racial-ethnic minorities as well as socio-economically disadvantaged and rural populations in the U.S. continue to experience a disproportionate share of many diseases and adverse health conditions. However, precision medicine holds great promise for reducing these health disparities through better targeted prevention and treatment strategies, according to James. “We want to make sure that precision medicine can actually benefit all Americans,” she says. “For those Americans who might be disproportionately affected by health issues or have poor health outcomes, we want to ensure that the science is also addressing those populations.” While James contends that NIMHD’s precision medicine program shares the vision of President Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative, she emphasizes that its effort is not connected to the PMI longitudinal research cohort of 1 million or more U.S. volunteers that NIH is currently rolling out. “These are two separate initiatives,” says James. “The money that Congress allocated for the PMI cohort is different. This is funding from the Institute itself to specifically focus on precision medicine research on health disparities.”

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EY - Blockchain reaction: Tech plans for critical mass

EY - Blockchain reaction: Tech plans for critical mass | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

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Blockchain is the first native digital medium for peer-to- peer value exchange, establishing the rules - in the form of globally distributed computations.


Blockchain’s diverse business and industry possibilities are ultimately limited only by everyone’s collective imagination. The following seven scenarios demonstrate the breadth of the technology’s potential impact. • Embedded health. As in the embedded finance scenario, a blockchain could host a health care information ecosystem including providers, payers and patients, along with their related data (electronic health records, pharmaceutical data, real-time health telemetry from wearable activity trackers, etc.). Payments could run seamlessly among the insurer, patient and provider. Even though no one party owns or controls all the information, smart contracts could define circumstances in which private information is shared, such as releasing medical information to emergency responders treating accident victims. Further, “Feedback from wearables could either reduce or increase a person’s premium in real time, depending on the reward system established by the insurer,” says Champion de Crespigny.

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Researchers stored an OK Go music video on strands of DNA

Researchers stored an OK Go music video on strands of DNA | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it
DNA storage could transform our computing lives within a decade.

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=DNA

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 12, 2016 5:50 AM
DNA storage could transform our computing lives within a decade.

 

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http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=DNA

 

 

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Here's Van Gogh's Starry Night Recreated with 'DNA Origami'

Here's Van Gogh's Starry Night Recreated with 'DNA Origami' | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it
Vincent van Gogh’s “Starry Night” seems to have a special appeal for scientists, who have recreated it using bacteria, among other media, in the past. Now scientists at Caltech have made their own tiny version of the painting—a dime’s width across—out of folded DNA molecules. Some day the same technique could be used to build teensy biosensors, or for targeted drug delivery.
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NantHealth raised $320 million to bolst it's offers- a cloud-based, clinical decision support platform used by at least 250 hospitals

NantHealth raised $320 million to bolst  it's offers- a cloud-based, clinical decision support platform used by at least 250 hospitals | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

NantHealth raised $320 million in a round led by Kuwait Investment Authority (KIA) with participation from Verizon, Celgene, BlackBerry, and Blackstone. KIA contributed $250 million to the round, according to Nant. This brings the company’s total funding to north of $400 million.

KIA also invested $100 million in NantHealth earlier this year — in May. BlackBerry’s investment in the company was announced in April.

NantHealth offers a cloud-based, clinical decision support platform used by at least 250 hospitals, according to the company. Nant offers a range of services, including a population health platform and a suite of products built to provide a learning system for the treatment of cancer.

In addition to the funding, NantHealth announced that former WebMD COO, United Healthcare CIO, and VantageMed CEO Steve Curd was hired as NantHealth’s Chief Operating Officer. The company also hired former Strand Diagnostics President and Genomics Health Vice President of US Sales Laura Beggrow as NantHealth’s executive vice president of commercialization.

“Our new leadership team has the expertise, relationships and deep knowledge necessary to drive NantHealth forward and make our vision of transforming the healthcare system and delivering truly personalized medicine a reality,” NantHealth CEO and Founder Patrick Soon-Shiong said in a statement. “Their addition to the company along with KIA’s continued investments show the strength and confidence in NantHealth’s ability to deliver on 21st century medicine and value-based population health care.”

NantHealth is something of a rollup since it includes a number of acquisitions over the years, like medication adherence offering Vitality GlowCaps and the home health technology provider Boston Life Labs. Nant Health also invested $8 million in Fluential, in November 2013, a stealthy but longstanding company working on “of speech optimization and deep language understanding tools for mobile devices, wearables and consumer ‘personal assistant’ applications.”

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Health agency calls for review of drug evaluation in NHS - FT.com

Health agency calls for review of drug evaluation in NHS - FT.com | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Kendal may be synonymous with the Lakeland walks beloved of its adopted son  Alfred Wainwright, the famed guide book writer, but in other respects it is an  enemy of health and wellbeing.

As home of the Kendal Mint Cake (recipe: mainly sugar) and a producer of pipe  tobacco and snuff since 1792, the Cumbrian town of 28,000 people has probably  contributed more than its fair share of sickness to the rest of the country

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Roche's new breast cancer drug, Kadcyla, has been criticised by the UK's health spending watchdog Nice for being too expensive Its estimated price tag of £90,000 per patien

Roche's new breast cancer drug, Kadcyla, has been criticised by the UK's   health spending watchdog Nice for being too expensive   Its estimated price tag of £90,000 per patien | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

Roche's new breast cancer drug, Kadcyla, has been criticised by the UK's   health spending watchdog Nice for being too expensive.

Its estimated price tag of £90,000 per patient easily makes its the most   expensive drug for advanced breast cancer that has been submitted to Nice in   recent years.

<noframes>Interactive chart: Advanced breast cancer drugs recently rejected by Nice</noframes>

It is perhaps unfair to compare Kadcyla directly with other advanced breast   cancer drugs since it is the first of its kind by delivering a powerful   chemotherapy agent directly to cancer cells.

Kadcyla has been shown to extend the lives of patients by an extra six months,   on top of the two year survival that can be achieved with the current   standard treatment. And because the drug delivers chemotherapy straight to   the cancer cells, it carries fewer side effects.

To account for this, Nice tries to adjust drug prices for the effectiveness of   the medicine using its quality adjusted life years (QALY) measurement. But   even by this scale, Kadcyla is among the more expensive treatments:

<noframes>Interactive chart: Advanced breast cancer drugs recently rejected by Nice</noframes>

Roche says it offered a discount - the exact figure has been kept under wraps   - but that it would have had to drop the price by 60pc to satisfy Nice's   value-for-money criteria.

But why was the drug so expensive in the first place?

Jennifer Cozzone, head of health economics and pricing at Roche, told the   Telegraph that the price was determined by two major considerations.

First, the "value" that the medicine represents to the entire   healthcare system, including the benefit to the patient as well as whether   the drug could help save money elsewhere by, for example, cutting hospital   admissions.

Second, the level of investment that goes into a medicine. Ms Cozzone did not   reveal the precise cost to Roche of developing Kadcyla, but said that it has   taken 30 years to develop, half of which was the basic scientific legwork   before the drug was even tested in humans.

A frequently cited figure in the drugs industry is that it costs around $1bn   (£595m) to get a drug to market. Pharmaceutical giants commonly argue that   their high drug prices are necessary to ensure they can continue to invest   in next generation medicines research.

She also argued that several other European countries, such as Finland,   Denmark, Austria, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland, have given Kadcyla the   green light. However Nice has countered that this is not a fair comparison   since patients contribute more towards the cost of their drugs in many of   these countries.

Roche now hopes that Nice will change its mind about Kadcyla and has launched   an appeal against the decision. But the underlying conundrum - that the NHS   simply cannot afford the drug industry's latest cancer medicines - will   probably require a much more radical solution.

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Tablets vs. paper: how the Philippines halved the cost of healthcare delivery

Tablets vs. paper: how the Philippines halved the cost of healthcare delivery | Innovations in Healthcare | Scoop.it

A project in the Philippines has reduced the cost of collecting healthcare information and delivering public health messages to the poorest families by almost half over five years, a university study has found.

 

ACCESS, a non-profit think tank, has trained the government’s community health teams to collect health information on families using tablets, replacing paper forms which they had been using since 2011.

 

The health workers can now use a mobile and web app to summarise the data collected and automatically generate reports. The City Health Office can also directly access the reports online and share them with other government agencies.


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Andrew Spong's curator insight, July 30, 2014 6:44 AM

A lesson in how effective technology can be in delivering great results from an HEOR perspective when legacy EHR vendors don't get in the way.