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Innovations in e-Learning
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Lynn University to drop Blackboard Learn in favor of iTunes U | Inside Higher Ed

Lynn University to drop Blackboard Learn in favor of iTunes U | Inside Higher Ed | Innovations in e-Learning | Scoop.it

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Carl Straumsheim: "Lynn University will phase out its learning management system for the next stage of its tablet-centric evolution. Beginning this fall, the university’s daytime undergraduate courses will be managed through Apple’s course management software, iTunes U.

The move makes Lynn one of only a handful of institutions that offer more than a select few courses through iTunes U, and is noteworthy because Lynn will trade a more comprehensive system, Blackboard Learn, for a product lacking key features such as analytics, attendance tracking and gradebooks...Lynn will likely develop its own systems to track what iTunes U doesn’t,...

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Flush With $80M, Desire2Learn Buys ‘Anti-Sharepoint For Students’ Platform Wiggio, Its 2nd Acquisition In 2 Months | TechCrunch

Flush With $80M, Desire2Learn Buys ‘Anti-Sharepoint For Students’ Platform Wiggio, Its 2nd Acquisition In 2 Months | TechCrunch | Innovations in e-Learning | Scoop.it
The EdTech space is growing fast -- from every angle -- talent is starting to cross over from consumer-facing companies, schools are looking to go digital, national policy is changing and student debt is out of control.
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Course-Management Companies Challenge MOOC Providers - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Course-Management Companies Challenge MOOC Providers - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Innovations in e-Learning | Scoop.it

Two software companies that sell course-management systems, Blackboard and Instructure, have entered the race to provide free online courses for the masses.

On Thursday both companies plan to announce partnerships with universities that will use their software to teach massive open online courses, or MOOC’s. The companies hope to pull in their own college clients to compete with online-education players like Udacity and Coursera.

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A Post-LMS World (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE

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What’s wrong with canned courses? Just one thing. « Lisa’s (Online) Teaching Blog

What’s wrong with canned courses? Just one thing. « Lisa’s (Online) Teaching Blog | Innovations in e-Learning | Scoop.it

"As we see colleges like Rio Salado and for-profits like National, Argosy, and Walden “Universities” create huge online programs, we see more and more courses designed by “teams” and taught by associate faculty/staff. When online learning began, of course, faculty created their own courses and taught them, but there were efficiencies to be had by creating one course and having it be reused by everyone. Publishing companies were quick to start creating their own courses to go with their textbooks, complete with Blackboard cartridges and/or their own learning management systems (I was asked by at least one of them to write a course they could sell). And now Google and Pearson are teaming up with their own “free” LMS (you’ll pay with your personal and marketing information) so that people can “share” courses (in their LMS’s format) under a Creative Commons license (Attribution only, of course, so they can be sold later — it wouldn’t do to have them be Non-Commercial and Share Alike).

 

Sense my disgust? To me, these are all canned courses, made to last a long time and be consumable by anyone, but more importantly, taught by anyone. We continue to sojourn, often voluntarily and with enthusiam, into the Land with No Professor, as detailed elegantly by Alex Wright in his From ivory tower to academic sweatship of 2005.'

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