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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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5 Factors and Adoption Rate Tools to Predict Change Success with your Innovation – VinJones

5 Factors and Adoption Rate Tools to Predict Change Success with your Innovation – VinJones | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
The excerpted post below is part of a two part series that offers change and innovation adoption rate tools.


What I like about Kevin's 2-part series is that it is not about the unconvincing ROI, return on investment metric. It is about the powerful effect of stories, examples and case studies that inspire and "spark ...imagination.


His first post focuses on the five (5) factors to use to predict the rate of adoption. The second post offers tools and templates to give you an adoption rate measurement.

___________________________


Contrary to popular belief, an ROI will not convince them. ...it is stories and examples and case studies which spark their imagination. ~ Kevin Jones, vinJones.com

___________________________


Also keep in mind that change and innovation are quite different from each other. This is particularly highlighted in our two curation streams: Innovation in Institutions, Will it Blend? and the one you are reading, Change Leadership Watch.


We are also highlighting Kevin's tools on CMRsite.com, a non-partisan change management resources site.


Excerpts:


The Adoption Index
One of my favorite books is Diffusion of Innovations by Everett M. Rogers. Although this largely academic book was originally written in 1962, it hasn’t lost any of its usefulness. It explains why innovations and technologies are adopted, or not, and at what rate.


1)“Relative advantage is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as better than the idea it supersedes."


The degree of relative advantage may be measured in economic terms, but social prestige factors, convenience, and satisfaction are also important factors.”


2)“Compatibility is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as being consistent with the existing values, past experiences, and needs of potential adopters.


3)“Complexity is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as difficult to understand and use.”


Read the full post for all five factors and the link to part 2 of the series that offers adoption rate tools.



via vinjones.com

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Cohabitation, academics & industry: Midwestern colleges launch Innovation campuses, public-private collaboration

Cohabitation, academics & industry: Midwestern colleges launch Innovation campuses, public-private collaboration | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"'Innovation campuses' are springing up everywhere" especially in the Midwest.

 

...the intentional cohabitation of academics and industry is key to all of them, something university leaders say made the ambitious and expensive projects palatable to legislators and voters even as the economy and higher ed appropriations shrunk.

 

Here's sampling of what is under contruction, via Inside Higher Ed:

 

...many [are] in the Midwest and almost all involving fancy new buildings and partnerships between public colleges and private corporations.

 

Public research universities have long had ties to state industries, and technology transfer is widespread in higher education.


The new innovation campuses include:


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP), Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Industries Not Worth Saving - U.S. Whaling: An Innovation Story for Today, The Atlantic

Industries Not Worth Saving - U.S. Whaling: An Innovation Story for Today, The Atlantic | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"An extinct business offers surprisingly current lessons about the triumph of technology, the future of work, and the inevitable decline of industries that might not be worth saving."


--------------------------------

...the vessel's technology had become so easy to maneuver, even an unwashed cannibal could use it.

--------------------------------- 


In context, consider the companion predatory for-profit higher education news - taking advantage of the GI bill for returning vets and producing, for some vets, what turns out to a worthless degree, with considerable debt, and slim job prospects.


Excerpts: 


BLUBBER!    Fat had never made a city so flush.

In the mid-nineteenth century, New Bedford, Mass., was the center of the whaling universe and the richest city per capita in the United States -- if not in the world, according to one 1854 American newspaper. The US whaling industry grew by a factor of fourteen between 1816 and 1850.


Innovations in winch technology made it easier to pull in or let out large sails, reducing the number of skilled workers needed to man a vessel.


...Winch tinkerings practically made the book Moby Dick possible. Melville could realistically populate his book with shady, far-flung, ragtag characters precisely because the vessel's technology had become so easy to maneuver, even an unwashed cannibal could use it.


Other featured innovations:

  • Americans sailed bigger and better ships, guided by smarter ocean cartography and more precise charts.
  • ...whale captains were innovators in employee compensation. 
  • ...tinkerings with harpoon technology led to the invention of the iron toggle harpoon, an icon of 19th-century whaling.


Decline wasn't in the rise of the oil/petroleum economy, it was:

  • US workers got too darn expensive, and other countries stole our share of the whale business.
  • Between the 1860s and the 1880s the wages of average US workers grew by a third, making us three times more expensive than your typical Norwegian seaman.
.
Click the title link for the full article.
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Negative Innovation: Predatory For-Profit Colleges & GI Bill Money continues, new legislation pending

Negative Innovation:  Predatory For-Profit Colleges & GI Bill Money continues, new legislation pending | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Frontline's expose' (PBS, Frontline)  highlights predatory practices aimed at returning military veterans."  


Weakened legislation has been passed.  More robust legislation is pending, finally, aimed at curbing what sponsors call aggressive marketing of subpar, profit-motive programs.


The abuses include:

  • volume oriented higher-education program recruiting, 
  • inaccurate verbal statements from recruiters about transferable credits that conflict with binding legal documents, and 
  • political wangling about legislation to stop the abuses that, if weakened, can be highly profitable to the politically connected.  

That these for-profit higher education institutions have taken aim at returning war veterans is the most appalling.  Innovation doesn't come with morality guidelines.  That rests solely within leadership ethics.


Excerpt 1:  EXPOSÉ Online [The PBS] film ...Educating Sergeant Pantkze, features, how in recent years, for-profits have increased efforts to attract veterans after the passage of a robust new post-9/11 GI Bill in 2008.   Frontline has also covered for-profit practice in an earlier expose' in 2010, in a program entitled College.Inc.


Excerpt 2:  Predatory for-profit schools
Military columnist Tom Philpott, a former Coast Guardsman, has led the criticism of what he calls the “predatory for-profit schools” that “rob veterans of their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits.” He quotes Theodore (Ted) L. Daywalt, chief executive officer and president of VetJobs, an online job search firm for military veterans, as saying that he learned about the problem through working with disappointed vets who thought they had used their GI Bill to earn credible degrees only to learn they were “worthless.”


“The eighth for-profit company among the top 10 institutions getting GI Bill payments is Kaplan, owned by The Washington Post. Its Post-9/11 GI Bill payments climbed in 12 months from $17 million to $44 million,” noted Philpott. 


Source 2:  http://www.canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/43648

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The World’s 50 Most Innovative Companies 2012 | Fast Company

The World’s 50 Most Innovative Companies 2012 | Fast Company | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Fast Company's annual guide to the businesses that matter most, the ones whose innovations are having an impact across their industries and our culture.


This interactive list also includes the top 10 by industry.  How does your organization stack up?



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Finishing – The 7th unique trait of a corporate intrapreneur - Innovation Excellence, Institutions

Finishing – The 7th unique trait of a corporate intrapreneur - Innovation Excellence, Institutions | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Can corporate cultures truely support entrepreneurial thinking, which is intraprenuership?  


This series of posts features Steve Todd's view of the 7 elements of intrapreneuring.  


Excerpt from #7, which gives a good overview of the full series:


A brief review: the first three habits (productivity, initiative, and collaboration) accelerate idea generation in a corporation.


The next three habits (3-Box time Management, Plus-2 Visibility, and Bridge Building) allow an intrapreneur to move forward and ultimately receive corporate approval for completing their idea.


The trait of finishing closes a circle that connects with the first trait of productivity. Intrapreneurs finish because they are productive; it is, after all, their foundational trait.

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Will they Pay? Degrees & UnBundling: Massive online courses not a game changing innovation > Competency building is

Will they Pay?  Degrees & UnBundling: Massive online courses not a game changing innovation > Competency building is | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Higher ed disrupters:  It may not be what it seems, Alice.   It's the unbundling and competency building that makes the difference.


As shared on this curation stream, with higher education seeming like one of the next bubbles to burst, due to high cost, ossified bureacracies and the like, there is more to the story.


The context, if you've missed it, is further below.   Meanwhile, here's a few other things to consider having to do with profitability, the value of a degree & unbundling - several key concepts for these changing times for higher education:


Excerpted:


If you build it, will they pay?

...when the chattering class meets Professor Thrun, it’s love at first sight. The notion that they might take a Stanford course for free recalls their youthful days at similar elite universities


...educational romantics already have degrees. And when Udacity begins charging even modest fees for its courses, Professor Thrun may find this group resistant to paying for lifelong learning.


"Degrees are definitely not disappearing; they’re not even in decline."

...in developing economies, where there is truly a hunger for knowledge in any form and where the degree may not yet be as central to the evaluation of prospective employees [like it is in the US], the wage premium from a bachelor’s degree is even higher [than the US]:

  • 124 percent in Mexico,
  • 171 percent in Brazil and
  • 200 percent in China,
  • compared with a mere 62 percent in the U.S.
.

Unbundling & Building Success in Competencies are the Innovation

Salman Khan's popular on-line Khan Academy videos teach a single concept.

  • Stanford Professor Thrun’s (reference below) online course builds on Khan’s innovation, and the resulting andragogy is remarkable.


Professor Thrun had to say in his announcement, excerpted:


We really set up our students for failure. We don’t help students to become smart.


Grades are the failure of the education system.  ...So rather than grading students, my task was to make students successful.


We changed the course so the questions were still hard, but students could attempt them multiple times. And when they finally got them right, they would get their A+. And it was much better.


Today, when someone fails, we don’t take time to make them a strong student. We give them a C or a D, move them to the next class. Then they’re branded a loser, and they’re set up for failure. This medium has the potential to change all that.


Context, excerpted:

The news media has been abuzz over two higher education developments:


1) MIT announces an extension of its successful OpenCourseWare initiative and that it will offer certificates to students who complete courses. MITx will allow students to access content for free. Students who wish to receive a certificate will be charged a modest fee for the requisite assessments,  issued under the name MIT.


2) Sebastian Thrun, an adjunct professor of computer science at Stanford who invited the world to attend his fall semester artificial intelligence course and who ended up with 160,000 online students, announced he had decided to stop teaching at Stanford and direct all his teaching activities through Udacity, a start-up he co-founded that will offer online courses from leading professors to millions of students.


He called the experience of reaching so many students life-changing: “Having done this, I can’t teach at Stanford again. I feel there’s a red pill and a blue pill. And you can take the blue pill and go back to your classroom and lecture your 20 students. But I’ve taken the red pill, and I’ve seen Wonderland.”


Read more via InsideHigherEd.com


Photo credit: DaBok, Flickr cc

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Beware the Entrepreneur's Recoil, Toxic to Innovation

Beware the Entrepreneur's Recoil, Toxic to Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"When we pull back, stop innovating ourselves and rebuff innovation and creativity from employees, we create an idea-killer emotional virus that destroys the very culture that got us where we are. "


Great piece on dealing with the cycles of innovation, success, risk.  Entrepreneurs get to be SO good at dealing with barriers, problems, set-backs and failures that success itself becomes another hurdle to overcome.


Excerpted, Jonathan Fields:


One of the biggest misses in the entrepreneurial process and mind is the assumption that mindset and willingness to embrace risk and creativity are fixed traits. In fact, the more successful most people become, the more they abandon the very mindset that fueled their success.


I call this the Entrepreneur’s Recoil.


So when you start a business, you adopt a do or die, all-in mindset. You come up with and are open to crazy ideas in the name of creating breakout businesses. And you’re willing to act on them. Because, beyond ego, even if you fail, the fall really won’t cause that much pain.


But, then something happens. You succeed.


Your mindset begins to shift into what famed psychologist and winner of the Nobel Prize for behavioral psychology, Daniel Kahneman, calls loss aversion mode.


1)  Rather than being driven by what you can build, create and have, you are overwhelmed by a fear of losing what you’ve already amassed.


2) Loss avoidance cultivates a strong negative creativity bias that makes us say no to innovative ideas.


When we pull back, stop innovating ourselves and rebuff innovation and creativity from employees, we create an idea-killer emotional virus that destroys the very culture that got us where we are. It breeds loss-aversion, fear and scarcity, which is death to innovation and expansion.


So...

Take a step backand ask a big question -
“Am I operating from a place of creative opportunity or loss aversion?”


Photo credit:  sean dreilinger, Flickr

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Midsize Firms Focus on Technology & Business Processes for Growth - IndustryWeek, January 2012

Midsize Firms Focus on Technology & Business Processes for Growth - IndustryWeek, January 2012 | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Innovation in mid-size companies?  If they are to grow, global is a key path.  Right now, the reports are about technology and business processes.


"Executives attribute productivity increases to business process improvements and tech investments.  Strategic hiring is lower on the list."


Technology spending trumps hiring for most executives at midsize companies as they seek to control labor costs while boosting productivity, Deloitte reported in its Mid-market Perspectives survey.


Of those executives surveyed, 70% said productivity has increased since the recession began. But the two most-cited reasons for the increase in productivity were improved business processes and technology.


Thirty-eight percent (38%) of respondents said "strategic hiring in critical areas" offers a path to higher productivity. But 45% of executives responding said the need for their companies to become more productive is restraining new hiring.


The survey, conducted by OnResearch in July and August, questioned 696 executives at midsize U.S. companies with annual revenues between $50 million and $1 billion.



Photo:  RobotTown at TEDxDetroit 2011, by D. Nystrom

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Why Get a Pricey Diploma When a Badge Will Do? | Forbes

Why Get a Pricey Diploma When a Badge Will Do? | Forbes | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Against the backdrop of a student loan bubble, the high cost of four-year college, and an extremely difficult job market, alternate forms of skill certification are gaining steam."


Khan Academy, which provides free online lectures to K-12 learners, and OpenStudy, which runs college-level online study groups based on OpenCourseWare – the MIT content backbone to the exciting MITx interactive platform  – are already providing badges for student contribution to discussions, excellence in answering questions, and in providing help to fellow students.


Don’t sneer at these “softer skills.” By rewarding cooperative learning, such badges mirror the team-oriented environment at many corporations (especially tech-heavy workplaces).


Moreoever, the proposed low-cost MITx “certificate” for completion of a course or a set of courses is really just another form of badge. If successful, this free-course-plus-badge model would be a huge step towards a self-directed, self-tailored, free and certified online university experience.


However, it’s not all rosy in Badge Land. Commentators like Alex Reid, associate professor of English at the University of Buffalo, question the effect that badges will have on a traditional liberal arts education.


“Extrinsic rewards like badges might be good incentives for certain kinds of rote behaviors or to get someone to try something new. But, as I understand it, they have a negative impact on creative, problem-solving activities (i.e. the kinds of things we really need our students to learn to do),” wrote Reid, in a scathing post entitled “Welcome To Badge World.”


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The United States Is Destroying Its Education System, Truth?

The United States Is Destroying Its Education System, Truth? | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Provocative! Themes include:  analysis paralysis, money as the goal, corporate greed, and classism.   It's not politics, it's education.


Excerpted:

 

A nation that destroys its systems of education, degrades its public information, guts its public libraries and turns its airwaves into vehicles for cheap, mindless amusement becomes deaf, dumb and blind.

 

It seems the USA:

  • prizes test scores above critical thinking and literacy.
  • celebrates rote vocational training and the singular, amoral skill of making money.
  • churns out stunted human products, lacking the capacity and vocabulary to challenge the assumptions and structures of the corporate state.
  • funnels them into a caste system of drones and systems managers.
  • transforms a democratic state into a feudal system of corporate masters and serfs.
.
The author, Shannon Smith, is the Associate Director at EDUCAUSE. She lists: Author. Historian. Ed Techie. Innovator. Tribal College Faculty. Progressive.

Via Smithstorian
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7 Steps to a Culture of Innovation | Josh Linkner, Michigan Success Story

7 Steps to a Culture of Innovation | Josh Linkner, Michigan Success Story | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Most companies fail to unleash their most valuable resources: human creativity, imagination, and original thinking. They lack a systematic approach to building a culture of innovation, and then wonder why they keep getting beaten to the punch."


Josh speaks from tested experience.  His 7 steps include:


1. Fuel Passion

2. Celebrate Ideas

3. Foster Autonomy

4. Encourage Courage


Josh Linkner is a five-time entrepreneur, venture capitalist, professor, and The New York Times best-selling author of Disciplined Dreaming – A Proven System to Drive Breakthrough Creativity. You can read more about him at www.JoshLinkner.com.

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The Faculty Project offers Free Online Courses from Elite College Faculty | Inside Higher Ed

The Faculty Project offers Free Online Courses from Elite College Faculty | Inside Higher Ed | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Bricks and mortar institutions:  meet online disruptors in the academy.  Udemy is the next shoe dropping with its Faculty Project, online courses offered by professors at a number of top institutions.

 

This announcement comes right on the heels of news about a Stanford professor leaving his tenured job in order to reach bigger audiences that have flocked to his artificial intelligence course online.

 

Excerpt:

Udemy, a company that allows anyone to create and sell courses through its online platform, has announced a new area of its site, called The Faculty Project, devoted to courses by professors at a number of top institutions, such as Colgate, Duke University, Stanford University, Northwestern University, Vanderbilt University, the University of Virginia, Dartmouth College and Vassar College. While Udemy is a for-profit enterprise, the Faculty Project courses will be free.

 

The goal is to “elevate the brand,” according to Gagan Biyani, Udemy’s president and co-founder. The company says it has no immediate plans to monetize the Faculty Project, and would never do so without the input and permission of its faculty contributors.


Via Smithstorian, Keith Hampson PhD
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Open Source Tackles eHealthcare Records In Places Microsoft Can't

Open Source Tackles eHealthcare Records In Places Microsoft Can't | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

" if a midwife is juggling three deliveries at a time, recording the details isn’t high on the list of priorities," especially in underdeveloped countries.


This use of open source technology reminds me of a systemic innovation by a doctor who's innovation cut premature infant mortality almost in half in Mumbai.  Innovation in underdeveloped countries has lessons for us all.


Excerpt:


eHealth Nigeria is using an open source health records system to create digital records of births a happening across northern Nigeria each day.


Under the aegis of their nonprofit, eHealth Nigeria, Castle and Thompson have built a digital records system meant to eventually serve healthcare facilities across northern Nigeria, but it doesn't use the sort of specialized health care software in U.S. or even everyday database software.


There's no Kaiser software. And no Microsoft.


The system is based on OpenMRS, an open source health records system designed specifically for use in underdeveloped regions. 



Read more via wired.com, click on the article title / link for the full story

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Bell Labs: A Hive of Invention - NYTimes.com

Bell Labs: A Hive of Invention - NYTimes.com | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
A selection of its most important innovations in the decades leading to the breakup of its parent company, AT&T, in 1984, and how they helped lead to some of the latest technologies....
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Innovation in the US via Bell Labs Miracles

Innovation in the US via Bell Labs Miracles | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Bell Labs offers many lessons about how our country’s technology companies — and our country’s innovative edge — actually came about from companies like Bell Labs.

For a long stretch of the 20th century, Bell Labs was the most innovative organization in the world.

Complexity, systems thinking & collaboration > elements of the Bells Labs major contributions to the world via transistors, solar technology and much more.
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RELENTLESS! Reinventing Higher Education, Southern New Hampshire University @SNHU via Fast Company

RELENTLESS!  Reinventing Higher Education,  Southern New Hampshire University @SNHU via Fast Company | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"As president of Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU), LeBlanc is ...using technology to transform an 80-year-old college into a modern education powerhouse."


I tweeted about @SNHU over a year ago, as I was intrigued they had an MBA in Social Media.  However, it led to a conversation with several people at the institution.  


After experiencing a considerable amount of the hidebound nature of the ivory tower of higher education, the experience I had with SNHU was a breath of fresh air, informed by data and, could it be, skilled process?


New England is the land of the ivies.   So much the better for @SNHU (their twitter handle) to leverage what they do as they think & implement differently.


Stay tuned, an interview may soon follow...


Excerpts:

Founded in 1932 as the New Hampshire School of Accounting and Secretarial Science, SNHU was a modest school when Le­Blanc joined as president in 2003, recognized for its culinary arts, business, and justice programs. Its online program was, as LeBlanc puts it, "a sleepy operation on a nondescript corner of the main campus. I thought it was squandering an opportunity."


That little operation has turned into SNHU’s Center for Online and Continuing Education (COCE), the largest online-degree provider in New England.


Its 10,600 students are enrolled in 120 graduate and undergraduate programs and specialties, everything from a sustainability-focused MBA to a creative-writing BA.


Fifty more programs will be launched this year, and the COCE recently tested TV ads in national markets such as Raleigh, North Carolina; Milwaukee; and Oklahoma City.


LeBlanc hopes that by 2014 SNHU will boast the country’s biggest online not-for-profit education system.

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Two Of New York's Hottest Entrepreneurs Explain Why Doing Social Good Is Great For Your Business

Two Of New York's Hottest Entrepreneurs Explain Why Doing Social Good Is Great For Your Business | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Be excellent to each other."


Here's why the companies were so successful, according to the founders:


Neil Blumenthal, co-founder of Warby Parker:


We find that 50 percent of the people coming to our site come from word of mouth, and because we do good, we feel like that's a big part of generating that buzz.


Lincoln Brown, co-founder of SoJo Studios:


We have around 450,000 players — around 2.5 percent of them pay for goods in the game. We give around 50 percent of our profits — but no less than 20 percent of our revenue — to social good.


It turns social games from a guilty pleasure into something gamers feel good about playing.


Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/two-of-new-yorks-hottest-entrepreneurs-explain-why-doing-social-good-is-actually-great-for-your-business-2012-2#ixzz1mHmi0oxS

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HR is ripe for social disruption. Innovating HR structure to support peer learning, innovative organizations

HR is ripe for social disruption.  Innovating HR structure to support peer learning, innovative organizations | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Is it finally time for Social HR? What's out there that uses social systems to revitalize how people are recruited and learn, grow and develop within organizations?


If organizations tend to be hidebound against change, Human Resources (HR) is even more so, in spite of the trendy strategic HR spin of the early 2000's . Consider HR's roots, which persist today: labor relations, compensation, employment/personnel and the number of lawyers on staff.


Here's some fresh thinking about embracing social as a new definer of HR systems from Gautam Ghosh.


Excerpted, adapted:


Recruitment:  HR has been quick to leverage social media to “Broadcast” vacancies. The next level would be actively creating and nurturing communities of practice shaped around skills where hiring managers can gauge level of skills of people and also develop them (Disclaimer: The author works with BraveNewTalent, a platform that helps organizations do that)


Knowledge Sharing: Forget the idea of databases acting as “repositories” of knowledge, internal social networks can capture employees work activity as social intranets  – and team members can follow what others are doing on their activity streams. Newer tools like Opzi and MindQuilt can also emerge as a enterprise version of Quora, the popular Q&A site.


HR policies: Using a social tool which leverages crowdsourcing ideas from employees can help HR in co-creating processes and policies – and raise acceptability when they are finally rolled out. Dell’s EmployeeStorm is a great example by which employees give ideas on everything in the company.


From the autho, Gautam Ghosh, a Product Evangelist and India Marketing Lead at BraveNewTalent specializing in the areas of HR, organization development and learning and employee engagement. He has worked as a HR Generalist and a Learning and Development Executive in firms like Deloitte, Dell, Hewlett Packard and Satyam Computer Services."

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Open Innovation & Organizational Boundaries, in Institutions, Will it Blend? — HBS Working Knowledge

Open Innovation & Organizational Boundaries, in Institutions, Will it Blend? — HBS Working Knowledge | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Open innovation, enabled by low-cost communication and the decreased costs of memory and computation, has transformed markets and social relations.


As the authors illustrate, it will be challenging to manage contrasting modes of innovation, and that is exactly what is needed in organizations that expect to innovate and are systemically, culturally, not set up to help this happen. 



Excerpts:

Open innovation, in contrast to firm-centered innovation, is radically decentralized, peer based, and includes intrinsic and pro-social motives.


The authors of this working paper use in-depth examples from Apple, NASA, and Lego to argue that open innovation will at least complement, if not increasingly substitute for, more traditional innovation modes.


This is within the contexts of increasing modularity and decreased communication costs.   (DN:  Just look at digital communication today.  Think ahead 4 months to 1 year of what's next.)


Emerging theories must be informed by these contrasting innovation modes and the implications for governance, incentives, intellectual property, managerial choice, professional and organizational identity, and organizational cultures.


Key concepts include:


  • Leaders and senior teams can take advantage of contrasting innovation modes, paradoxical organizational requirements, and associated dynamic boundaries.

.

  • Leaders need to execute strategic choices with the systems, structures, incentives, cultures, and boundaries tailored to open and firm-based innovation modes.
.
  • Multiple types of boundaries will increasingly be employed to manage innovation, from traditional to complex intra firm boundaries (such as ambidextrous designs), to webs of interdependence with partners and potentially anonymous communities.
.
  • Senior teams must build their capabilities to deal with contradictions as well as their organization's ability to embrance contradictions.  


A link to the full working paper, downloadable by Assistant Professor, Karim R. Lakhani & colleague is here.


Source:  Karim R. Lakhani is an assistant professor in the Technology and Operations Management unit at Harvard Business School.  


This link was also recommended by Jeffrey DeGraff at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, and I also think it's right on, even if the language is quite academic.  It will make you think about your institutional systems, and refresh your vocabulary.    ~  Deb

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3 snapshots of Chinese innovation: GM, Semiconductors, AstraZeneca | McKinsey

3 snapshots of Chinese innovation: GM, Semiconductors, AstraZeneca | McKinsey | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Chinese innovation is evolving in diverse ways and at an uneven pace across a range of different industries.


1) GM China president Kevin Wale explains the importance of team-based innovation efforts in China and describes GM’s rapidly growing Advanced Technical Center in Shanghai. He also observes that innovation in China’s auto industry is more about commercialization models than technical achievements.


What China does better than any place else in the world is to innovate by commercialization, as opposed to constant research and perfecting the theory, like the West.


When the Chinese get an idea, they test it in the marketplace. They’re happy to do three to four rounds of commercialization to get an idea right, whereas in the West companies spend the same amount of time on research, testing, and validation before trying to take products to market.


2) The semiconductor industry is a powerful example of the tension surrounding China’s potential for innovation.  For two decades they have sought to create a more potent domestic semiconductor industry—with mixed results.


3) AstraZeneca's R&D focuses on unique disease mechanisms in China.  Certain diseases have high prevalence and, in many cases, could have different populations or different disease etiologies, presenting a white space on which R&D innovation can focus.

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The Yin and the Yang of Corporate Innovation, Apple & Google CEO shifts in leaders

The Yin and the Yang of Corporate Innovation, Apple & Google CEO shifts in leaders | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Apple and Google take very different paths to innovation, but the gap between their approaches may be closing ."


The New York Times, interviews John Kao, an innovation adviser to corporations and governments — and a jazz pianist — pre-performance and talk at the pending 2012 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.


A few excerpts:

The Google model relies on rapid experimentation and data.  It takes a bottom-up approach to customers as participants and partners in product design.


The Apple model is more edited, intuitive and top-down.  Regarding market research into Apple designs, Steve Jobs' standard answer was none. “It’s not the consumers’ job to know what they want,” he would add.


From these yin/yang cultures, we have this final quote in the article:


In the months after Larry Page, the Google co-founder, took over as chief executive last April, the company eliminated a diverse collection of more than two dozen projects, a nudge toward top-down leadership.


And Timothy D. Cook, Apple’s C.E.O., will almost surely be a more bottom-up leader than Mr. Jobs.


“What we’re likely to see,” Mr. Kao says, “is Google and Apple each borrowing from the playbook of the other.”

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Growth Limits: 'Paradigm-shifting innovation is what we need' - Hindu Business Line

Growth Limits: 'Paradigm-shifting innovation is what we need' - Hindu Business Line | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Growth is going to come only through innovation, focusing on poor countries. In the current environment you can grow aggressively only by inventing and innovating.


Prof. Vijay Govindarajan is widely regarded as one of the world's leading experts on strategy and innovation.


Excerpts:


The innovation agenda, people are also realising, has to be in poor countries. Because, ...the world's overall population of about seven billion now, there are three billion who are rich enough for the products which have already been invented.


But the four billion poor, who are non-consumers of just about everything, have to be brought into the consuming base.


...Reverse innovation first requires that you innovate in the poor country. That is step one.


Step two is to take it to other emerging markets. Step three is to bring it to the US or other rich countries. Most companies haven't even reached step one. That itself is a big one because American companies still think of India as poor and ‘therefore they want cheap products'.


They have to change that mindset; they are coming from a different mindset of innovations. They have to first think about changing the innovation paradigm itself and then about how to take it to other countries.


Two important traps Indian companies should absolutely avoid. The first trap is to ‘dumb-down' the technology and make something cheap. No. That is not what people want. People want technology-rich products, but also at the right price.


The Apple Nano is one example.


Keywords: Prof Vijay Govindarajan, Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth, American multinationals, product innovations, dumb-down technology, Flexibility, credibility

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Can you Disrupt Your Own Culture Structure? | Four Key Innovation Contradictions

Can you Disrupt Your Own Culture Structure? | Four Key Innovation Contradictions | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Innovation is fraught with contradictions.  Is there room for innovation's natural contradictions in your organization culture?  


A handy indicator is looking at your organization's people policies (HR) as a quick capacity test. 


Four Key Innovation Contradictions excerpted, Innovation Excellence:


1) Innovation requires a business to embrace processes and methods that are far different from the efficient, effective processes that sustain short term profitability. Innovation creates new, risky, uncertain concepts that will pay off in quarters if not years.


2) While executives want innovation, they don’t want the disruption or investment strain required which creates dissonance in the teams that are actively trying to do interesting innovation work, and leads to confusion and then cynicism.


3) Transparency, visibility and commitment are key. Doing innovation work is tough, and doing it without the full support of the senior team, constantly demonstrated, means that many innovators have far fewer resources than they need.


4) The contradiction between what we TELL people to do and what we PAY people to do when we do nothing [or too little] to change how these individuals are evaluated, compensated and rewarded. 

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Dave Snowden Classic: Apollo 13, Creativity is not Innovation, Pressure, starvation & perspective shift is.

A common mistake in management today is to confuse creativity and innovation.


Dave's classic video illustrates his 3 principles for innovation:

Pressure, starvation and perspective shift produces innovation.

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