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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Three Tenets of Mastering the Unknown, Leadership through Ambiguity

Three Tenets of Mastering the Unknown, Leadership through Ambiguity | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
“Those who struggle with ambiguity sometimes reach for false certainties just to appear decisive.”

If it is about sense-making in ambiguous business situations, I’m intrigued.


Randall White & Sandra Shullman have classic and newer information on dealing with ambiguity in leadership, both in 2010 and in 2012.


Highlights:


Using LSP  (Learning Sensory Preparedness) to succeed in your business:


1. LEARN:  Learn to make a decision with incomplete information.


    2. SENSE:   Train your mind to be fluid and attuned to faint signals of impending change. 

     
    3. PREPARE:   Examine five ideas or trends that you know nothing about, but that will affect the business in three to five years.


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    The original 2010 post of this article by both authors included the comment that mindset — more than personality and behavior — forms an observable pattern among some of the most successful leaders and that a fearless approach to uncertainty is required.  ~  Deb

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    Fasten Your Seatbelts: Google's Driverless Car Is Worth Trillions - Forbes

    Fasten Your Seatbelts: Google's Driverless Car Is Worth Trillions - Forbes | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    "Google's driverless car has broad implications for society, for the economy and for individual businesses. Just in the U.S., the car puts up for grab some $2 trillion a year in revenue..."

    Excerpt:

    We consistently underestimate the implications of a change in technology—Kodak, Blockbuster, Borders, Sears, etc.—


    Many industries face the kind of disruption that may beset the auto industry


    [This blogger will be doing a series on] the ripple effects that the driverless car may create ~  disruptive technology  ~ the dangers and the opportunities that one creates. 

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Forecasting the future is tricky, however, Google has made some major shifts (their unified User Interface, UI), and why wouldn't the inventors of the Google Maps be on the trail for something even more revolutionary?  ~  Deb

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    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 26, 2013 4:01 PM

    Why wouldn't the inventors of the Google Maps be on the trail for something even more revolutionary?  ~  Deb

    PS:  Also listed on Innovations and Institutions ScoopIt news.

    Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, January 27, 2013 4:40 AM

    We have been talking about this oin the Harvard Trends Books: as the drones on the air, we will have driveless cars on the ground. Or at least, drive easy cars.

     

    It´s a complete new market for the next 30 years, starting probably like 2020 

     

    Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

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    Decisions Smarts: Why 'Big Data' Should Be The Word Of The Year, not YOLO

    Decisions Smarts: Why 'Big Data' Should Be The Word Of The Year, not YOLO | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    Excerpts:


    What's new is the way data is generated and processed. ...We kick up clouds of it wherever we go. Cellphones and cable boxes; Google and Amazon, Facebook and Twitter; cable boxes and the cameras at stoplights; the bar codes on milk cartons...
     

    {When] those little chunks are aggregated ~ they turn into Big Data; then the software called analytics can scour it for patterns.

    Epidemiologists watch for blips in Google queries to localize flu outbreaks; economists use them to spot shifts in consumer confidence.

    Police analytics comb over crime data looking for hot zones; security agencies comb over travel and credit card records looking for possible terrorists.
     

    This was the year we held the first Big Data election, too. The Republicans may have had more money, but the Obama campaign had better voter data and analytics.

    • That gave them an edge in identifying likely supporters and finding the best ways to reach what they call "low-information" independents — which turned out to include running ads on Jimmy Kimmel and the rerun cable network TV Land. 


    • And it was Big Data analytics that Nate Silver used to correctly predict the election outcome in all 50 states, skunking the pundits in the process.
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    A pleasure to read, this NPR opinion piece takes "Big Data" and makes it accessible, gives great examples, and asks a key question:   What are patterns for? ~ Deb

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    Ten (10) Tech Trends That Will Change 2013 Business, Innovation Opportunities

    Ten (10) Tech Trends That Will Change 2013 Business, Innovation Opportunities | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    Excerpts from10 top technology trends that may shape your 2013 business creativity and innovation.


    Excerpts:



    1. Big data goes mainstream.


    Paul Daugherty, CTO at Accenture, predicts that 2013 will be the year that many companies plunge into big data in a big way, which doesn't ensure success, notes M. Eric Johnson, director of the Center for Digital Technology at Dartmouth University.
       

    "…we will continue to see a good deal of disappointment, …a lot of companies are clueless about how to unlock the value …in their data."

      
    2. The digital enterprise emerges.
    A confluence of technologies and systems is ushering in an era of digital acceleration. Clouds, mobile technology and social media increasingly make proprietary hardware and software platforms irrelevant.
       

    Bill Briggs, global lead of Deloitte Digital and deputy chief technology officer for Deloitte Consulting. "There is an immense interrelationship among various digital technologies. They are profoundly reshaping business and creating enormous opportunities."
        

    3. Social media gets sophisticated.

            
    "…the combination of mobility, social and location-based services has the ability to transform the enterprise."

         

    4. Clouds are everywhere.

       
    "The cloud means that you can …create a sum greater than the individual parts, …[which] also translates into greater agility and flexibility."

        

    5. IT stocks talent.

       
    Organizations are loading up on IT talent and building centers of technology excellence to spur innovation.

       

    …Last September, General Motors said that it plans to hire as many as 1,500 workers to staff a new computer technology center near Detroit. Other major companies have made similar announcements in recent months.

       
    6. IT means business.

       
    "We're at the point where you cannot separate business strategy from technology strategy," explains Deloitte's Briggs.  

    "Siloed organizations cannot act in the highly agile manner that's necessary," Georgetown's Prashant warns. He says that organizations must create cross-functional teams and engage in practices that help IT and business executives become more fluent in each other's domains.

        

    7. The post-PC era takes hold.  

       
    "It's vital to deliver the full fidelity of services and offerings across mobile platforms," says David Reilly, managing director of Bank of America's Technology Infrastructure organization. 2013 will be a year in which IT executives must focus on creating a consistent experience across devices and browsers.

        

    8. Consumerization rules.
    Confront the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) movement and the consumerization of IT to support smartphones, tablets and other employee devices.

        

    9. Organizations get serious about cyber-security.
    Cyber-threats are increasing…Ernst & Young's Nichols says that organizations must examine security in a more holistic manner, including examining the cloud, partners and mobile systems.

    The good news is that tools are becoming more sophisticated, and the coming year may be as a turning point.


    10. Analytics is for everyone.

       

    "We are quickly reaching a point of maturity…" …Analytics software is allowing more agile and effective decision making in business. This trend will continue to accelerate in 2013.

         

    Read the full article here.


    Photo credit: by UggBoy UggGirl - Flickr

        

    Similar articles from Deb's blog:

        

         


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:
    • Technology continues as an accelerator to business and a foil for creativity and innovation.  This is a great list to add to the trends cited in Change Leaders Watch.
           
    • It's also a good trend watch mix for what's next in our VUCA world  (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous), although this list helps it be a tad less so.

       
    ~  Deb 

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    Top 10 Innovations 2012 | The Scientist Magazine®

    Top 10 Innovations 2012 | The Scientist Magazine® | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
    The Scientist’s 5th installment of its annual competition attracted submissions from across the life science spectrum. Here are the best and brightest products of the year.


    Here's an excerpt from 2 of the Top 10:


    1 - BioFab - GEN9

    Making synthetic genes to program microorganisms used to require a lot of time, expense with robots and other equipment.  Gen9 has developed BioFab, a new system that can quickly and cheaply produce tens of thousands of double-stranded DNA fragments of between 500 and 1,000 base pairs in length.


    The ability to synthesize large numbers of genes in parallel at low cost could transform the field of computational protein design,” says molecular engineer David Baker of the University of Washington, who is a customer and a member of the Gen9 advisory board.


    The company has about 20 customers—half from industry, half from academia. ...By 2013, Gen9 hopes to singlehandedly surpass the world’s current capacity to manufacture synthetic DNA.


    2 - Ion Proton System - Life Technologies

    Twelve years ago, it cost $1 billion to sequence a single human genome. By next year, using Life Technologies’ Ion Proton machine, it will take less than a day and cost $1,000 (not including analysis costs, of course).


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    Martha Stewart, Stacy London (What Not to Wear) via Mashable's Innovation Index

    Martha Stewart, Stacy London (What Not to Wear)  via Mashable's Innovation Index | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    "It's always fun when celebrities play in the innovation space, as they're doing with Mashable's 2012 Innovation Index, which just launched."


    Why not some fun with Martha & Stacy + Mashable's new Innovation Index process?


    Excerpted:


    Each curator is responsible for a category, and is charged with choosing five nominees for the most-innovative mantle in that category. There are 15 categories in all.


    The nominees can be companies, products, technologies or events. Mashable chooses fourteen curators, with readers getting to apply for the 15th slot. The winner of the curator slot will find out on Nov. 26.


    Readers then vote on which nominee in each category should be considered the most innovative.

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    Intuit: The Thirty-Year-Old Startup - Experiment and Innovate

    Caroline Donahue shares how Intuit works to constantly experiment and innovate for its customers.

    Via Karen Steffensen
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    What It Takes to Be a Serial Innovator INSIDE established companies

    What It Takes to Be a Serial Innovator INSIDE established companies | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    "Researchers discuss the characteristics of people who successfully develop significant innovations in established companies."


    Why serial innovators are fairly rare:  The low percentage make sense as the qualities needed are difficult to nourish in many corporate cultures.


    Excerpt:


    Serial innovators, whom the authors define as people who develop and bring to market at least two successful breakthrough products in an established company, are not all that common.


    Griffin, Price and Vojak estimate that they represent anywhere from one in 50 members of an R&D and engineering staff at a smaller organization to one in 200 at a larger organization — and perhaps as few as one in 500 at most Fortune 200 companies.


    ___________________________________


       ...willingness and ability to “cross the bridge,” ...taking on the organizational politics required to convince others ...of the value of their innovation

    ___________________________________


    Typical characteristics of serial innovators:

      

    • a track record of technical excellence (which helps them gain freedom to innovate within their organizations) and 
        
    • a strong focus on solving important problems for customers (which helps them choose commercially relevant problems to tackle). 
      
    • They also have a willingness and ability to “cross the bridge,” as the authors put it, from merely inventing a good solution to taking on the organizational politics required to convince others in the company of the value of their innovation. 

         

    • curiosity and 
       
    • systems thinking => integrate disparate data and information, creatively connect the dots in logical and powerful ways.

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    Envisioning the Future of Ed Tech: Emerging Trends

    Envisioning the Future of Ed Tech:  Emerging Trends | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    This visual suggests emerging technologies likely to influence education in the upcoming decades.


    Some of the driving trends behind the technologies can already be observed.


    Via Anne Whaits, Donna Murdoch, Marcel Lebrun, Emmanuel Zimmert, michel verstrepen
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    Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems

    Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
    Recent research reveals that people are more capable of mental novelty when thinking on behalf of others than for themselves.

     

    Great piece on enriching the field of view and other perspectives, something we also encourage in executive coaching.  


    ________________________


    ...abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. ...But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite.

    ________________________


    Excerpts:

     

    Over the years, social scientists have found that abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. That means that if we care about innovation we need to be more abstract and therefore more distant. But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite. We intensify our focus rather than widen our view. We draw closer rather than step back.

     

    That's a mistake, Polman and Emich suggest. "That decisions for others are more creative than decisions for the self... should prove of considerable interest to negotiators, managers, product designers, marketers and advertisers, among many others," they write.

     

    Dan Pink's suggestions, excerpted:

      

    • Recruit more independent directors.   Begin with corporate governance. 

    ~ having independent directors on the boards of public companies. 

     

    • Rethink the structure of your firm.

    Perhaps loose alliances of distantly connected people

     

    • Harness the power of peers.

    ....assemble a small group of peers – all from different industries – and gather periodically to exchange ideas and offer solutions from new perspectives.

     

    • Find a problem-swapping partner.

    Find a friend or colleague with whom you can occasionally swap problems...

     

    • Disasssociate yourself.

    Imagine you're doing it for someone else...


    Full article here

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    Startups spurn Innovation District as rents rise - Boston landlords, what were you thinking?

    Startups spurn Innovation District as rents rise - Boston landlords, what were you thinking? | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
    Startups spurn Innovation District as rents rise...


    Well now, innovation becomes a high rent district?  Since when did courting start-ups go with raising the rents by 40 percent in the last year?


    Boston, now really!


    Excerpts:


    The issue, however, had more to do with the terms of the lease than with price, he said. Landlords in the Innovation District were looking for leases of two years or more, which isn’t reasonable for fast-changing startups, Vigeant said.


    Case in point: Tracelytics announced today that it has been acquired by a fellow Boston tech company, AppNeta.

    Abroad101, which had been based in the Innovation District at the MassChallenge office for the past two years, also opted to focus on other parts of the city in the search for their new office, president Mike Stone said. The startup settled on an office on South Street in the Leather District, which the company moved into this week.

    In a tweet Wednesday, Erica Farthing, event producer at event planning company Assembly Boston, summed up the situation this way: “Confused why the Fort Point ‘innovation district’ is now priced too high for most start ups. Riddle me that!”

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    Innovators Help Business Change From Within - MarketWatch

    Innovators Help Business Change From Within - MarketWatch | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    "Sustainable business innovation & leadership capacity:  The Aspen Institute's 4th cohort of fellows who promote business growth with a sustainable society launches."  


    This program looks like it can make a significant leadership impact within institutions who desire to innovate in a healthy, sustainable way.  Aspen fellows are selected based on peer nomination.


    Excerpts:


    _________________


    "There is a clear public call for business to create long-term value for shareholders, communities, employees and the planet. We need innovative leaders who can tackle this challenge."


    _________________


    The Aspen Institute Business and Society Program today announces the fourth class of First Mover Fellows, individuals who are working within companies to unite business growth with a sustainable society in the products and services they are developing.


    The 21 Fellows chosen this year come from a wide variety of industries including finance (Citigroup and BlackRock); energy (GE Energy); retail (Walmart); technology (Microsoft, HP and AOL); clothing (Levi Strauss and Nike); executive search (Egon Zehnder International); and advertising (Arnold Worldwide).


    _________________


    The 12-month Fellowship...is built around the core themes of innovation, leadership, reflection and community.

    _________________


    "The work of these remarkable business innovators demonstrates the array of opportunities companies have to achieve financial success and positive social and environmental impacts," says Nancy McGaw, director of the First Movers Fellowship Program.


    The 12-month Fellowship, which includes three seminars, is built around the core themes of innovation, leadership, reflection and community.


    The program offers individuals a chance to become part of a growing community of innovators who share a passion about their work and belief in new possibilities for business. It also serves as an innovation lab where Fellows develop the skills to make their innovations real and successful in their organizations.


    The program offers both a leadership development opportunity for the Fellows and an organizational development strategy for their companies.


    "Today there is a clear public call for business to create long-term value for shareholders, communities, employees and the planet. We need innovative leaders who can tackle this challenge," explains McGaw. "This Fellowship program focuses on how to build this kind of leadership capacity within business."


    Candidates for the fellowship must be nominated by their peers.

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    Here Come The Intrapreneurs - Forbes

    Here Come The Intrapreneurs - Forbes | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    "There is a third way, and it's called being an intrapreneur."


    Yes, you can innovate from the inside, but as in many organizations, it depends on culture, climate, placement, experience, network, and many other factors.


    ___________________________


    a large organization that becomes complacent and loses sight of the benefits of having an entrepreneurial streak built into their massive global systems can find themselves disrupted in short order. ~ David Armano

    ___________________________


    Here's a recent Forbes interview take on an older idea, intrapreneuring, that has been around awhile.  It's always worth a look, if it might tip the scales in favor of your organization being more intrapreneurial.


    Excerpted:


    From the full post by David Armano, executive VP, Global Innovation & Integration at Edelman.


    while entrepreneurialism seems to be enjoying a golden age of sorts, it isn’t for everyone.


    An intrapreneur is someone who has an entrepreneurial streak in his or her DNA, but chooses to align his or her talents with a large organization in place of creating his or her own.


    ...several years ago when I struck up a conversation with an older gentleman at a train station and I described what I did for a living, he said something I’ll never forget: “Oh, you’re an intrapreneur–so was I.”


    ...Some of my peers who are doing work in the social business industry also are intrapreneurs whether they suspect it or not:  

    • Scott Monty of Ford, 
    • Ekaterina Walter of Intel, 
    • Richard Binhammer of Dell, 
    • Pete Blackshaw of Nestlé, 
    • Bonin Bough of Kraft and 
    • Frank Eliason of Citi, to name a few.


    The start-up community has successfully demonstrated that the modern world needs entrepreneurs.


    But this only makes intrapreneurs more critical, because in a world filled with fast-moving change, a large organization that becomes complacent and loses sight of the benefits of having an entrepreneurial streak built into their massive global systems can find themselves disrupted in short order.


    This is where intrapreneurs come in handy. Smart organizations will seek out individuals who like to invent, innovate and want to be on the front lines of change. 


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    Bill Gates Futuring and HR/Recruiting Stuck in a Time Warp

    Bill Gates Futuring and HR/Recruiting Stuck in a Time Warp | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    Bill Gates has been in the media of late with “My Plan to Fix the World’s Biggest Problems.”


    Gates’ solution is about continuous improvement.  However ...as Gates’ says, this is simple in concept, but often difficult to execute.  

      


    Excerpts:
      
    While times have changed for most business functions, it seems that the HR and recruiting departments are stuck in a time warp, circa 1975.

      

    1) Stop using skills and experience-based job descriptions.... Instead require the hiring manager to define the job in terms of 6-8 measurable performance objectives.


    2) Measure the hiring manager’s ability to attract, develop and retain top people.


    3) Never interview more than four people for any job.


    4) Define Quality of Hire before the person’s hired based on a performance-based job description.


    Related article from Deb:


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    The author of this article uses HR and recruiting as an example of old practices that need updating as good hires (and good talent development and succession planning) are the front door to smart, high performance cultures.

    Balanced scorecards began to be used for the very reason of taking HR's people hire impact into a balanced account of measurement, beyond finance to internal business, learning and growth.


    Using performance based job descriptions and innovation (refurbishing boring jobs) can be transforming to organizations still working from a 70's model of HR.

    Be aware, overdoing metrics also has drawbacks, such auto companies over-relying on measurement, via ill-conceived management purges (that also appeared age-driven.)  Staffers served in roles as mentors that also produced lower numbers in their metrics because they were taking time to help newly hired and learning youngers.  The lack of a systemic focus lowered productivity and morale at the same time.  

    ~ Deb

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    Boeing 787 Dreamliner, Disruptive Innovation and Competitive Advantage

    Boeing 787 Dreamliner, Disruptive Innovation and Competitive Advantage | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
    Grounded 787 Dreamliner was inevitable, perhaps welcome by Boeing. Let them solve issues, to retain competitive advantage from disruptive innovation


    Excerpt:

    One misstep and Boeing’s competitive advantage could go away.


    ______________________
       
    Misguided over-attention and uncompromising scrutiny is just what a competitor needs to steal...Boeing’s competitive advantage

    ______________________
       

    Boeing’s insightful decision to focus on fuel economy over size and supersonic speed was and still is a well-aligned decision for the industry, airports, customers and the economy.


    Misguided over-attention and uncompromising scrutiny is just what a competitor needs to steal all the knowledge and innovation gained at the expense of Boeing’s engineering effort, trial and testing.


    Boeing’s competitive advantage would be gone, in a snap.


    Boeing would be held hostage by regulators, lawyers, and hearings as they defended the 787 Dreamliner.


    Boeing could be completely absorbed....reducing available minds focused on solving issues and potential speed of innovation we saw in the lifecycles of every Boeing aircraft to date.



    Read more: http://steinvox.com/blog/2013/01/24/boeing-787-dreamliner-disruptive-innovation-and-competitive-advantage/#ixzz2J20GzGZK
     


    From Deb, completely absorbed?  Fight back:




    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Perhaps it's time to bring Whole-Scale Change back to Boeing, one of the large group methods that nourished innovation and creativity back in the Dannemiller Tyson days.  ~  Deb

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    Big Data Predictions for 2013

    Big Data Predictions for 2013 | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    Several innovations will come in 2013 that will change the value of Big Data exponentially. Other technology innovations are just waiting for smart start-ups to put them into good use.

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Institutions are one the place that centralization and big data make sense. IBM is already on this trail in Canada for government communication.  ~  Deb

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    beyondthearc's curator insight, January 6, 2013 4:31 PM

    Will 2013 be the year that companies take full advantage of big data?

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    Six Stages to Achieving a Big Data and Innovation Culture

    Six Stages to Achieving a Big Data and Innovation Culture | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
    Companies are realizing analytics are actually at the center of their company, whereas before analytics was just at the edge. According to Bruno Aziza of SiSense, that’s having an impact.


    Aziza’s credentials are robust. Prior to SiSense, he ran data analytics programs at Microsoft, Apple and Business Objects (now a SAP company). He is the co-author of two books in the business analytics space, one of them the best-selling tome, Drive Business Performance: Enabling a Culture of Intelligent Execution(Wiley, 2008).


     He is a fellow at the Advanced Performance Institute, an independent advisory group specializing in organizational performance, and he has over 12,800 Twitter followers at @brunoaziza.


    Excerpts:


    …there are six cultural stages, kind of like the five stages of grief, except that …the higher you go the better shape you’re in.

      

    1) Increased Visibility > looking at data but not able to tell what the data is telling them.

      

    2) Move Beyond Gut Feel > understand the data, apply judgment to it so you’re able to react to information faster than anybody else.

    In these first two stages, the types of problems you’re trying to solve are backwards looking analysis. you’re building infrastructure so you understand where your data comes from and what happened yesterday.

       

    3) Plan for Success > “Here is what success means.”

       

    4) Execute on Strategy > align our strategy to our knowledge, our ability to adjust based on success or failure on certain actions. Very few companies are at this stage.

       

    5) Power to Compete > you are able to compete, taking strategic market share from the market you’re in, or adjacent markets.

       

    6) Culture of Performance >  which is more of the North Star rather than a place where you end up:  “Run it like you own it.”

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Some data driven, high performance companies may be over obsessed with data. The author describes six (6) stages of becoming, including "achieving a Culture of Performance as more of the North Star rather than a place where you end up." ~ D

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    The Strategic Value of Unrealistic Goals - Accounting meets Vision & Innovation

    The Strategic Value of Unrealistic Goals - Accounting meets Vision & Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    "'Strategic intent" lets companies make big, bold bets, regardless of resources.'"

       

    The author, Vijay Govindarajan, went from professor of accounting to a new role as researcher on strategy and innovation, based on an article "Strategic Intent" by Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad's circa 1989.

        

    ________________________

       

    Strategic intent takes the long view - to operate from the future backward, disregarding the resource scarcity of the present.

    ________________________


       

    His point is huge for innovation to succeed:  

       

    • Strategic intent takes the long view -  to operate from the future backward, disregarding the resource scarcity of the present.
       

    Excerpts:

       
    There are two views on strategy. The conventional view is that the firm should assess its resources and match resources with opportunities.

       

    • If Canon had followed that advice in the early 1970s, it would have never taken on Xerox. 
       

    Hamel and Prahalad have an entirely different point of view. According to them, the firm should expand its resource base to meet its ambition.

       

    ________________________

       

    ...[a] firm should expand its resource base to meet its ambition

    ________________________

       

    ...In accounting, we always argued that "realistic" goals are the best, since they are achievable and as such are better motivators. I've even contributed to this literature on goal setting.

       

    But according to Prahalad and Hamel, firms should set unrealistic goals, not realistic goals.

        

    ...the more I reflected on the article, the more it made sense. Realistic goals promote incremental moves; only unrealistic goals provoke breakthrough thinking.

       

    JFK's audacious goal in the early 1960s when the U.S. fell behind the Soviet Union in the technology race: "this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth."

       

    • JFK's intent produced many breakthrough technologies.

       

    In a similar way, "Strategic Intent" inspired me to think about mountains and not molehills as I shaped my research agenda around breakthrough innovation.

       

    Read the full article here:

       

    From Deb, a companion article on Strategic Agility is here.   Regarding resources, note:

       

    • Resource Fluidity: the internal capability to reconfigure business systems and redeploy resources rapidly,
       
    • Collective Commitment e.g. Leadership Unity: the ability of the top team to make bold decisions –fast, without being bogged in “win-lose” politics at the top.

    Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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    Is Your Region Innovative, Productive, Creative, or Just Populated?

    Is Your Region Innovative, Productive, Creative, or Just Populated? | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    "A new study gauges the relative contribution of U.S. metros to innovation, the creative  class, economic growth and just population."


    At a glance, this may make resonate with what you know aout your regions.  ~ Deb


    Excerpts:


    Charted:  how regions contribute to four key categories of regional economic development — population, innovation, creativity, and economic output.  The study calculated a metro's share of the U.S. total for each of the four categories.


    There's some debate in the commentary about the charting.  A full report via .pdf is featured.


     

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    Getting the Balance Right: The innovation ecosystem, Infographic

    Getting the Balance Right:  The innovation ecosystem, Infographic | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    "The right innovation mix, core, adjacent, and transformational  depends on your business and your needs."


    Excerpted:


    There are three main components of an organisation’s innovation ecosystem. Getting the balance right between these three components is crucial:

       

    1) Balance/Mix of innovation types

      

    2) Structure (process, capabilities, culture, funding)

       

    3) Metrics & tracking


    • Core innovation is the largest amount of effort (70%) ...typically more incremental improvements

      

    • Adjacent innovation, riskier.  can involve taking existing products to new markets or, more commonly, developing value-add products or services to existing core 
      
    • Transformational innovation, highest risk - new products and services, new markets – big changes to the business


    Read the full article here.

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    If Steve Jobs Worked For You, You’d Probably Fire Him - Innovators and Administrators Don't Mix

    If Steve Jobs Worked For You, You’d Probably Fire Him - Innovators and Administrators Don't Mix | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    "Steve Jobs, in another incarnation (somebody with that level of talent and ability to think differently) is out there working for someone right now and is about to get fired."  ~ Greg Fraley

       

    Oh yes, so true.

       

    This is textbook as to how to frustrate, annoy, and bother management (versus leadership.) Those who manage or work with the early Steve Jobs type might also be threatened, or intimidated that someone in your shop is displaying "think different" and NOT towing the company  (org.) line and/or paying regular obeisance to top administrative leadership.  
       
    From one of the comments on Greg's post:  "Manager types are trained to do one thing - manage a company created by someone else. Founder personality and management personality stand far apart."
       
    It's part of why Simon Sinek has a huge following, thinking differently.  It is STILL rare in org. culture in this disrupted business world.
       
    For example, Simon has often repeated this nugget:
       
    Apple:  NOT, What we do, great computers.  Want to buy one?
       
    RATHER:  Everything we do, we believe in challenging the status quo, we believe thinking differently. The way we challenge the status quo is making products that are beautifully designed, simple to use & user friendly.  We happen to make computers.  Want to buy one?
       
    Reference:  http://www.scoop.it/t/change-leadership-vision/p/2268713217/it-s-got-to-be-about-why-not-how-how-great-leaders-inspire-action-simon-sinek
       
    Excerpted:

       

    Steve Jobs, in another incarnation (that is, somebody with that level of talent and ability to think differently) is out there working for someone right now and is about to get fired. New Steve might be working for you right now. Look closely at your list of trouble makers, [if you haven't downsized or fired them already.]

       

    Read Greg's full post here.


    More about Deb's world is here:

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    Presentation Videos

    Deb's REVELN website



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    The Facebook Business Model, Really? University Courses, Build Now, Money Later

    The Facebook Business Model, Really?  University Courses, Build Now, Money Later | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    Something ununusual is happening in usually glacially-paced universities; they are investing in a start-up strategy: "Build fast and worry about money later."

      

    There is some controvery that access to free courses does not a degree make, and that, after all, this could be a grand marketing scheme with questionable motives. Degrees are still in demand as much as they ever were.

      

    _____________________

       

    "[It's] a new educational plutocracy where the "rich" are enabled and embraced, and the middling and lower classes are given scraps ...so that they can participate, but perhaps not really benefit.  ~  Stacey Simmons

    _____________________

        


    "By denying qualified people (meaning those who have completed the work) access to degrees or some other endorsement, institutions are establishing a new educational plutocracy where the "rich" are enabled and embraced, and the middling and lower classes are given scraps by which they might educate themselves so that they can participate, but perhaps not really benefit, and certainly never enter the world of the elite. ~ Stacey Simmons, one of Fast Companies "Most Creative People"

      

    If you've seen the movie: The Social Network, you'll know that that using Facebook as a business model is not unknown to higher education. However something ununusual is happening in usually glacially-paced universities; they are investing in a start-up strategy: "Build fast and worry about money later."

       

    Excerpted:    

       

    Coursera is following an approach popular among Silicon Valley start-ups: Build fast and worry about money later. Venture capitalists—and even two universities—have invested more than $22-million in the effort already.

       

    _____________________


    But, does it change their lives for the better?
    _____________________


    "Our VC's keep telling us that if you build a Web site that is changing the lives of millions of people, then the money will follow," says Daphne Koller, the company's other co-founder, who is also a professor at Stanford.

        

    ====


    Deb: But, does it change their lives for the better?  Stanford, of course, had one of the first professors to jump ship to offer a large, free course to the world.  


    • Sebastian Thrun, an adjunct professor of computer science at Stanford who invited the world to attend his fall semester artificial intelligence course and who ended up with 160,000 online students, announced he had decided to stop teaching at Stanford and direct all his teaching activities through Udacity, a start-up he co-founded that will offer online courses from leading professors to millions of students.


    Stacey Simmons, CEO & Founder at Omnicademy, questions the motivations of offering free courses if degrees from prestigious institutions are not accessible to the many.  On the other hand, it could be an amazing new education model, per her TED conversation here.

         
        
    My own alma mater, University of Michigan, has been among the first to invest.

    Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education, How an Upstart Company Might Profit from Free Courses


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    Better Thinking by Not Thinking: Accessing your Unconsciousness - Liz Guthridge

    Better Thinking by Not Thinking:  Accessing your Unconsciousness - Liz Guthridge | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    "Where do you do your best thinking? Anywhere but your desk, if you’re like most knowledge workers and leaders. And probably not at work either. Not thinking, but relaxing into your unconscious can produce better thinking."

     

    Change colleague Liz Guthridge has a winner of a post on accessing quality thinking by simply not thinking for a spell.  Techniques of mindful meditation, rest (or siesta, as I'd prefer from my Argentine side), as well as just stepping away for a break can contribute to a fresh view and insights from the deep well of our unconscious. ~ DN

     

    Excerpts:

     

    _________________________

     

    Individuals tend to get good ideas while driving, exercising, reading, meditating or talking to others.

    _________________________

     

    That’s because we automatically tap into our unconsciousness to do most of our thinking. It doesn’t require effort on our part, as David Rock explains. Even better, our unconsciousness—which can seem as vast as the Milky Way—makes powerful connections for us.

      

    ...Offices are not brain-friendly settings.

      

    Her steps to access include:

      

    1. Quiet your brain. Start by putting aside all of the electronic gadgets that stimulate you and your brain. You also may want to close your eyes.

      

    2. Let your mind wander. (DN:  Mindfulness practices teaches us to observe thoughts, but to NOT engage them.)

      

    3. Put yourself in a positive state. 

     

    4. Do something else other than work on the issue, problem or dilemma you’re facing. 

      

    ===

      

    Read Liz's post in full here, which includes my commentary on accessing both the Jungian appreciation of the unconcious and using tools, like the MBTI used at the second level of functioning.


    ~  Deb


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    Global Innovation Challenge: 160 Yr. Old Parent Challenges Freudenberg North America to Target Zero Manufacturing Waste

    Global Innovation Challenge:  160 Yr. Old Parent Challenges Freudenberg North America to Target Zero Manufacturing Waste | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    "Freudenberg's North America companies are targeting zero manufacturing waste in response to a challenge set by parent corporation, Freudenberg and Co., during a recent internal Global Innovation Forum on raw materials and innovation."


    Going green in the North America continues to be an important business goals for companies, including the long time global veteran, Freudenberg and Company.


    Excerpt:


    ____________________________


    Freudenberg has a 160-year history of conducting its business with integrity and a commitment to the welfare of its plant communities.

    ____________________________


    In an ambitious drive to reach zero manufacturing waste ...Freudenberg North America's 16 companies will pursue processes that focus on ...recycling, lower water and energy consumption and increased use of sustainable materials over the next decade.


    "All of the companies are engaged in implementing processes and programs that will improve the environmental sustainability of their products and plants," said Leesa Smith, president, Freudenberg North America Limited Partnership.


    "The confluence of new environmental challenges and this long-standing corporate culture is pushing our people to develop green industrial innovations that will help solidify our success - and the health of our communities - into the next century."


    Freudenberg-NOK Sealing Technologies, in Plymouth, Mich., is pursuing dozens of technological innovations aimed at reducing the company's reliance on scare natural resources, lowering vehicle emissions, improving engine and transmission performance, supporting development of wind and solar energy and incorporating more recycled content in its products.


    Some examples from the Plymouth company:


    • Low Emission Sealing Solutions (LESS) components use one quarter of the energy a conventional radial shaft seal uses, thereby reducing fuel consumption and lowering vehicle emissions.


    • FluoroXprene® fluoroelastomers are a unique group of newly-developed materials that bridge the technology gap between PTFE and rubber while substantially reducing CO2 emissions and energy usage. FluoroXprene materials are completely recyclable. 
    .
    • The company is also pursuing ultraviolet (UV)-curable sealants that will reduce energy consumption, lower Co2 emissions and reduce cycle times.


    Read the full press release story here.

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    Shiny Syndrome: In Medicine, Falling for Fake Innovation

    Shiny Syndrome:  In Medicine, Falling for Fake Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
    We need to stop glorifying every new technology as an innovation.


    An opinionator post that is a cause for pause, when innovation turns into pseudo-innovation, higher cost and no improved results, or worse yet, poorer results.


    Excerpted:


    THE sleek, four-armed “da Vinci” robot has been called a breakthrough technology for procedures like prostate surgery. “Imagine,” the manufacturer says, “having the benefits of a definitive treatment but with the potential for significantly less pain, a shorter hospital stay, faster return to normal daily activities.”


    _______________________


    ...this is a pseudo-innovation — a technology that increases costs without improving patients’ health.

    _______________________


    Critics of the health care reform act say such innovations will be stifled by the new law, with its emphasis on cost control and the comparative effectiveness of new pills and devices.


    However...


    The da Vinci robot costs more than a million dollars, has never been shown by a randomized trial to improve the outcomes of prostate surgery. A 2009 study showed that while patients had shorter hospital stays and fewer surgical complications like blood loss when they underwent this kind of robotic surgery, they later “experienced more … incontinence and erectile dysfunction.” Similar problems are occurring with robotic surgery for other cancers.



    The Affordable Care Act will not reward this kind of innovation. But by providing incentives for hospitals to reduce infections, errors and readmissions, giving doctors more information on the comparative effectiveness of medical interventions and emphasizing preventive care over expensive services, the act will stimulate a panoply of true medical innovations. These may not be flashy; they might not even be visible to patients. But they will improve health care and lower costs.


    Source:  http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/27/in-medicine-falling-for-fake-innovation/

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