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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Scientists capture first images of molecules before and after reaction

Scientists capture first images of molecules before and after reaction | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Using atomic force microscopy, chemists for the first time can capture images of molecules before and after they react, which will allow them to better tune reactions to get the products they want.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I can see clearly now...down to the molecule! ~  Deb

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Innovation Leadership Lesson: The Difference Between Google and Apple

Innovation Leadership Lesson: The Difference Between Google and Apple | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Google and Apple - what makes for innovation and what are the lessons learned?

 

...Google could have made the decision to stay solely focused on search, but they had the foresight to move beyond the certainty of what is to pursue new opportunity by focusing on what if.


Apple on the other hand, while once the leading innovator in their space, has ceded that position to other more aggressive players like Samsung, HTC , and yes, Google.


Where Apple went wrong is they began to confuse version releases and feature improvements with innovation.  


Via Susan Bainbridge, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

How innovation wasn't, via Mike Myatt, at Apple vs. Google.  Interesting take worth a look.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 17, 2013 1:23 PM

Confusing version releases with innovation Apple?  Mike Myatt takes on "offense and defense."  And so goes the comparisons of two very different cultures and the leaders at the top.  ~  D

Ante Lauc's curator insight, May 17, 2013 11:56 PM

I would like that a new firm create their synthesis.

Denize Piccolotto Carvalho's curator insight, May 20, 2013 8:15 AM

Interesting...

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What Nassim Taleb Misses About Technology and Innovation

What Nassim Taleb Misses About Technology and Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"What Nassim Taleb misses about technology and innovation is that its purpose is not to entertain the delicate tastes of the chattering classes, but to improve the lives of us all.  ...What’s more, most of technology’s black swans are positive ones."


Excerpts: The Usefulness Of Useless Things


What Mr. Taleb fails to understand is that technologists are supremely aware that most of their efforts will come to nothing


_______________________

What, I wonder, would Mr. Taleb make of Edison’s 9,999th try?


_______________________


...They are, in fact, searching out black swans (to use Mr. Taleb’s own parlance), in full knowledge that they will spend most of their time rushing up blind alleys.  


What, I wonder, would Mr. Taleb make of Edison’s 9,999th try?

The truth is that useless things often end up very useful indeed.  Modern information technology did not originate with engineers, but has its roots in an obscure academic crisis, whose major figures, such as Cantor, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Gödel and others never dreamed that their work would have important practical consequences.


...What Mr. Taleb seems to miss is that these are ...people dedicated to following their dreams and willing to put their own skin in the game to do so.


What’s more, most of technology’s black swans are positive ones. 

As [Greg Satell] recently wrote in the Harvard Business Review, “Innovation is a particularly sticky problem because it so often remains undefined.”  You can’t simply focus on the technologies that are sure bets, but must take into account the entire matrix (pictured in the article, four quadrants.)

 

... the logical consequence of his argument) is that we should remain in the upper right quadrant, where both the problem and the domain are well defined and he would presumably assign the lowest value on basic research and disruptive innovation, which have no clear applicability.


Yet it is there that we break truly new ground.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've shared news about Taleb's perspective on Change Leadership Watch. It's now paired with this innovation perspective about the place of failure! a compelling view.  ~ D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 28, 2013 8:16 PM

This is a follow-up on the "Anti-Fragile" post below.  The author discusses failure is an important part of the process leading to success, as author Greg Satell explains via the nature of innovation.  


This seems to be a worthy new perspective and critique of Taleb's work, also listed in our Innovation and Institutions curation stream.  ~  Deb

Bill LeGray's comment, April 29, 2013 8:26 AM
Good thoughts verey deeply buried within the Social Media mileau. BUT not so deep I will not try to follow the Change Leadership Watch, and other excellent Forums provided by Scoop It. In fact, while quite broad, the entire Innovatioon and Institutions stream may be worth a look now and then. Deb; "Thanks for leading the way for creativity, process changes, and obtaining "better" innovations and institutions with more properly responsive institutional outcomes."
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, April 30, 2013 12:37 PM
Thanks for the comment Bill. Best to you.
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MOOCs, Blended Learning on Stage with Charlie Rose - Online Education

MOOCs, Blended Learning on Stage with Charlie Rose - Online Education | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"I will say the blended model, ...with certainty, is revolutionizing, higher education." "...access to a Master Teacher..."  ~ Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania


Charlie interviews:

  • Anant Agarwal, CEO of edX;
  • Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania;
  • Joel Klein, former New York City Schools chancellor and CEO of Amplify and
  • Tom Friedman of the New York 


Related posts by Deb:

  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

A blend of views discuss MOOCs and on-line education.  Note the access and pacing comments of Anant Agarwal from edX and what he's implying.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 26, 2013 11:22 AM

Pacing the learning, removing the exclusive, high expense of the classic 4 year degree, access to "Master Teachers," are some the the advantages.

An alternative view of higher education was forecast by a guest blogger on my own website who built his own degree at a much lower cost, listed above, "Right Sizing..."   ~ Deb

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Big Data, Challenging HR Beliefs, Empowering Worker Success

Big Data, Challenging HR Beliefs, Empowering Worker Success | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Work history does not matter as much as we think it does, and bosses matter more — these are findings from an emerging field called work-force science."

  

...Work-force science, in short is what happens when Big Data meets H.R.

   

....“This is absolutely the way forward,” says Peter Cappelli, director of the Center for Human Resources at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. “Most companies have been flying completely blind.”

  

Today, every e-mail, instant message, phone call, line of written code and mouse-click leaves a digital signal. These patterns can now be inexpensively collected and mined for insights into how people work and communicate, potentially opening doors to more efficiency and innovation within companies.



____________________________


...research ...found that the most important characteristic for sales success is a kind of emotional courage...even after initially being told no.


____________________________



For example:


...Tim Geisert, chief marketing officer for I.B.M.’s Kenexa unit, observed that an outgoing personality has traditionally been assumed to be the defining trait of successful sales people.

But its research, based on millions of worker surveys and tests, as well as manager assessments, has found that the most important characteristic for sales success is a kind of emotional courage, a persistence to keep going even after initially being told no.



____________________________


...numbers and grades alone did not prove to spell success at Google and are no longer used as important hiring criteria....

____________________________



For years, [Google] candidates were screened according to SAT scores and college grade-point averages, metrics favored by its founders. But numbers and grades alone did not prove to spell success at Google and are no longer used as important hiring criteria....

Google has found that the most innovative workers — also the “happiest,” by its definition — are those who have a strong sense of mission about their work and who also feel that they have much personal autonomy.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This may explain a few things, and encourage more focus on the hiring process and less on over-managing what comes after.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 21, 2013 8:04 PM

There are many implications for using the results for also helping individuals find more successful and satisfying career paths as well.  ~  D

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Innovate or Die: The Future of Business, Brian Solis Facts, Slideshare

"In the circle of life, connected consumerism is the new reality.  Those businesses that don't disrupt their own markets will find their markets disrupted for them."  ~ Brian Solis


Visual POW infographics from Brian Solis' new book, What's the Future of Business.


Relevant posts from Deb:

    

       

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Brian Solis features what is needed to influence responsive strategy in branding, including taking aim at your generation culture and ideas for adapting to what is next.  


Is your company adaptabile enough to stay healthy, growth or not?  


~  Deb

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Competition Powers Creativity: Cisco's "BIG" Jolt For Startups ~ Fast Company

Competition Powers Creativity: Cisco's "BIG" Jolt For Startups ~ Fast Company | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"How Jenny Griffiths inspired winning innovation in her futurefacing clothesbuying company Snap Fashion."


Griffiths's "BIG" Moment


In April 2012, Cisco announced the inaugural British Innovation Gateway, or “BIG” Awards, an annual contest offering $135,000 in prize money, an additional $75,000 in marketing, public relations, and legal support, plus a 12-month mentorship with Cisco’s own in-house business coaches for a company working in an undiscovered, tech-savvy niche.

In September, Griffiths won it all with a pretty basic message. As her 60-second spot put it: See something you love, want, need? Get your phone out… 


That’s led to some of the more widespread attention she’s been seeking. The U.K. Apple app store made Snap Fashion a featured download, which helped boost user traffic: The app has since had more than 10,000 downloads and the site attracts tens of thousands of users.


Mega-retailers that seemed unreachable before (think: Net-A-Porter) now cold call her to get more involved with the service. 


Griffiths plans to use the CISCO contest windfall and mentorship to expand. This year, she is releasing an Android app, building better platform compatibility with likes of iPads and iPad Minis, recruiting local designers to the site, and unveiling a men’s section.


...Cisco hasn’t offered to buy the company--at least, not yet. They seem to be betting that the example of a homegrown startup making it on its own in London will be more powerful encouragement to the legions of startups now sprouting in East London.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Cisco's contests within a contest serve important roles in innovation and entrepreneurship internationally, including showcasing examples like Jenny Griffiths.  ~  Deb

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Infographic: Meditation in Schools Across America

Infographic: Meditation in Schools Across America | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
"As a growing body of research points to positive outcomes from meditation in schools, programs are spreading across the country."Infographic: Maili Holiman

What do you think about this Schools That Work story? We'd love to hear from you!


Tweet your answer to @edutopia, comment below, or email us.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Meditation and mindfulness is growing as a sensible way to remove interference and amp-up the learning.  Very smart!  ~ D

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Precision Innovation: 3D-Printed Skull Implant Ready for Operation

Precision Innovation:  3D-Printed Skull Implant Ready for Operation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

3D printing technology has helped replace 75 percent of a patient's skull with the approval of U.S. regulators. The 3D-printed implant can replace the bone in people's skulls damaged by disease or trauma, according to Oxford Performance Materials.


______________________


"We see no part of the orthopedic industry being untouched by this..." 


______________________



The company announced it had received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its skull implant on Feb. 18, 2013— a decision that led to the first U.S. surgical operation on March 4.


"We see no part of the orthopedic industry being untouched by this," said Scott DeFelice, president of Oxford Performance Materials.


DeFelice's company is already selling 3D-printed implants overseas as a contract manufacturer.


But the FDA decision has opened the door for U.S. operations using the implants. [Video: A 3D Printer of Your Own]


3D printing's advantage comes from taking the digitally scanned model of a patient's skull and "printing" out a matching 3D object layer by layer.


The precise manufacturing technique can even make tiny surface or edge details on the replacement part that encourage the growth of cells and allow bone to attach more easily.

 

About 300 to 500 U.S. patients could use skull bone replacements every month, according to DeFelice. The possible patients include people with cancerous bone in their skulls, as well as car accident victims and U.S. military members suffering from head trauma.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

What are the implications?  For 3-D printing, it seems vast. ~ Deb

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External Business Intelligence Boosts Innovation and Profits

External Business Intelligence Boosts Innovation and Profits | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Companies can become more innovative and profitable by analyzing external sources of information such as social media, a new survey from Arthur D. Little says.


Using external data helps companies develop fresher ideas for products and services, said Rick Eager a partner at the firm. “Businesses get used to operating and thinking in a certain way and data gets filtered through the patterns of how we always do things,” Mr. Eager said. “When you always use the same channels for business intelligence, like internal sales figures, you are limited in what you can come up with.”


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

When you are in it, you can't see it.  ~  Deb

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Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks

Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen literally wrote the book on technology disruption...and he thinks Apple, Tesla Motors, venture capitalists and most of the nation’s colleges and universities should be afraid."

  

The author of The Innovator’s Dilemma said Wednesday that all of them could be killed by less advanced competitors in the same way that many once dominant technology companies have been in the past.

  

...He believes that and the commoditization of smartphones threaten Apple in the long run.

  

...“For 300 years, higher education was not disruptable because there was no technological core."

  

“But now online learning brings to higher education this technological core, and people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.'

__________________

    

...people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.

__________________


...“there is a different business model that is disrupting this in addition to online learning. It’s on-the-job education. ...you come in for a week and we’ll teach you about strategy and you go off and develop a strategy.  


...You learn it and you use it. These are very different business models and that’s what’s killing us.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've posted this to BOTH Change Leader Watch & here.  On the Innovations & Institutions stream, I'll be adding examples of organizations that are adapting to this disruption in academe and the other industries mentioned.  ~  Deb

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Marie Jeffery's comment, February 11, 2013 8:13 AM
KMInstitute.org
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, February 17, 2013 1:30 PM
Thanks for your comments Marie. Knowledge Management is quite an industry, with various opinions of the traction it holds in business. I am most curious as to where it is headed.
Patrick J Scanlon's curator insight, March 12, 2013 2:58 PM

If you don't like change.  You will like irrelevance even less #media #higherEd #VC

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Innovation and the Unknown Can be Very Difficult to Market

Innovation and the Unknown Can be Very Difficult to Market | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"In a fast moving world, how to make sure your innovation meets the success it deserves?"


...Doctor Levi Spear Parmly invented dental floss in 1815, the innovation was great! He found a perfect way to remove the dirt remaining between the teeth that no brush could reach. His product was responding to a real problem.


Unfortunately, even though the problem was real, people were unaware of it. Therefore, this great innovation that sounds like an obvious solution nowadays hasn't been on the market before 1882, 67 years later. Sometimes innovation solves problems for which people are unaware of a real need.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Good examples & good points about what it takes to make sure your innovation see the light of day in a busy, 6 seconds of video world.  


Henry Ford is said to have created the middle class, therefore the modern consumer of stuff, to his chagrin, by raising the rate of pay of his workers to greatly reduce turnover.  Bringing something new to the world, once known and embracing a newly discovered need, such as to travel from town to town, can change the world, if the marketing helps the innovation be known and accepted.~ Deb

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Bill Gates Futuring and HR/Recruiting Stuck in a Time Warp

Bill Gates Futuring and HR/Recruiting Stuck in a Time Warp | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Bill Gates has been in the media of late with “My Plan to Fix the World’s Biggest Problems.”


Gates’ solution is about continuous improvement.  However ...as Gates’ says, this is simple in concept, but often difficult to execute.  

  


Excerpts:
  
While times have changed for most business functions, it seems that the HR and recruiting departments are stuck in a time warp, circa 1975.

  

1) Stop using skills and experience-based job descriptions.... Instead require the hiring manager to define the job in terms of 6-8 measurable performance objectives.


2) Measure the hiring manager’s ability to attract, develop and retain top people.


3) Never interview more than four people for any job.


4) Define Quality of Hire before the person’s hired based on a performance-based job description.


Related article from Deb:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The author of this article uses HR and recruiting as an example of old practices that need updating as good hires (and good talent development and succession planning) are the front door to smart, high performance cultures.

Balanced scorecards began to be used for the very reason of taking HR's people hire impact into a balanced account of measurement, beyond finance to internal business, learning and growth.


Using performance based job descriptions and innovation (refurbishing boring jobs) can be transforming to organizations still working from a 70's model of HR.

Be aware, overdoing metrics also has drawbacks, such auto companies over-relying on measurement, via ill-conceived management purges (that also appeared age-driven.)  Staffers served in roles as mentors that also produced lower numbers in their metrics because they were taking time to help newly hired and learning youngers.  The lack of a systemic focus lowered productivity and morale at the same time.  

~ Deb

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Need a Job? Invent It & Learn from Finland

Need a Job? Invent It & Learn from Finland | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Finding a job is so 20th century. That is why young people today need to be more “innovation ready” than “college ready.”


We need lab schools where students earn a high school diploma by completing a series of skill-based ‘merit badges’ in things like entrepreneurship. And schools of education where all new teachers have ‘residencies’ with master teachers and performance standards — not content standards — must become the new normal throughout the system.”


Who is doing it right?


“Finland is one of the most innovative economies in the world,” he said, “and it is the only country where students leave high school ‘innovation-ready.’  They learn concepts and creativity more than facts, and have a choice of many electives — all with a shorter school day, little homework, and almost no testing.

[In the US, look at the] growing number of ‘reinvented’ colleges like the Olin College of Engineering, the M.I.T. Media Lab and the ‘D-school’ at Stanford where students learn to innovate.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The new economy is not about corporate jobs.  Haven't we seen that coming?  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 21, 2013 1:50 PM

Thomas Friedman is giving us perspective on what's here now and what's coming.  Solo-preneurs, entrepreneurs, the power of the network is becoming core to work in the new economy.   Hiding away in corporate job structures has been vaporizing, more quickly than the almost overnight shift from big cars to smaller ones in the 70s.  Are you ready?  Are your kids ready?  ~  Deb

 

Dominik Bláha's curator insight, September 24, 2013 12:45 PM

Yes!

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The Tipping Point between Structure & Innovation

The Tipping Point between Structure & Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Somewhere between the two extremes exists a tipping point – a place where full creativity and the lack of structure reaches a balance with purposeful, valuable and necessary structures and processes."


____________________

Balancing structure and freedom, processes and creativity is an art, not a science.  ____________________

Move much more toward additional structure and you begin to limit and stifle creativity and innovation outcomes. 


Move much more toward freedom and creativity and you lose the ability to manage, develop and commercialize ideas. Where does the tipping point reside?


Your innovation activities need enough structure to identify and commercialize great ideas effectively, but not so much structure that people are stymied or slowed by processes, forms and decisions. 


In organizations where purposeful innovation is fairly new, the tipping point is closer to the regimented side, since there are few widely distributed capabilities or tools. As an organization gains experience innovating, the structure and rigidity become less important, as innate skills and culture learn to shape and manage ideas more effectively.


Related posts by Deb:



   
Photo:  by lambdachialpha Flickr CC
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's the art of deciding how to get the balance right: SO MANY businesses along with newbie or ill-informed managers stifle creativity, resulting in rampant mediocrity, morale problems and talent loss. Turn it around from victim, persecutor roles to encourager, challenger, collaborator, coach of your innovators.  ~  D

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The Nature of the Future – Review | Harold Jarche

The Nature of the Future – Review | Harold Jarche | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Marina Gorbis identifies unique human skills [that] should be the core of any public education program.


  • Sensemaking
  • Social and emotional intelligence
  • Novel and adaptive thinking
  • Moral and ethical reasoning


As Gorbis write... “Learning is Social”.


We need to learn how to work better with machines, letting machines do what they are good at.


Gorbis shows how machines and average people can outperform experts at playing chess. 


“Weak human + machine + better process

was superior to a strong computer alone

and, more remarkably,superior to a

strong human + machine + inferior process.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's not just the skills, it's the social and the process, lest all the talk about MOOCs and universities and skill training lead to engineering and accounting.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 26, 2013 11:39 AM

Sensemaking of MOOCs and adaptive learning.  Trust a smart process.  ~ Deb

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Be Constructive—Not Invasive—With Big Data, The WSJ Experts Stream

Be Constructive—Not Invasive—With Big Data, The WSJ Experts Stream | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Two perspectives:  1) ...the real risk in a hyper-data world is use that crosses the line between constructive and invasive, and 2) that people will use it naively, and to mistake correlation.

   

Angela Ahrendts:  The security dimensions of Big Data are well rehearsed, and protection must be a given. ...the real risk in a hyper-data world is use that crosses the line between constructive and invasive.

  

For us, Big Data must be about serving our customers’ interests, rather than our own.

      

….Customer information should work for the customer, making every retail experience a great retail experience...    Appropriately protected and intelligently used, we believe it can do just that.

  

Angela Ahrendts (@AngelaAhrendts) is the CEO of Burberry.


____________________

Figuring out what causes what, and why and under what circumstances is hard work. Big Data is a tool for this work, not a substitute for it.

____________________


Andrew McAfee:  ... Big data’s great promise is that it’ll get us out of ....decision-making by HiPPO—the Highest-Paid Person’s Opinion. ... In the same way that witch doctors gave way to actual doctors as medicine became a science, HiPPOs will in many domains give way to data-driven decision making.


Many people accurately perceive that Big Data will give rise to privacy concerns, but I want to highlight a different risk:


  • That people will use it naively, and to mistake correlation (“as the geese fly away, the weather gets colder”) with causation (“the geese are causing winter!”). Figuring out what causes what, and why and under what circumstances is hard work. Big Data is a tool for this work, not a substitute for it.


Andrew McAfee ( @amcafee ), a principal research scientist at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the co-author of the e-book “Race Against the Machine: How the Digital Revolution is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity, and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy.”



Recent posts by Deb:  

  


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've already received a comment on my LinkedIn stream about the invasiveness of big data and employee email.  Here's two more perspectives on using Big Data well.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 25, 2013 7:41 AM

This article from this past April offers a way to see beyond the "shiny new toy" syndrome of the Big Data buzzwords, to help it be the tool it's meant to be.  ~  Deb

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What's Next? Union / Management collaboration: Creating Healthy, Fit Organizations

What's Next?  Union / Management collaboration:  Creating Healthy, Fit Organizations | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

What makes for a healthy, "anti-fragile" (adaptable, responsive) organization today?   I've posted by SideShare from my recent presentation to the Michigan Management Labor Association's (MMLA) presentation on Healthy Organizations and Wellness.


For unions and management, planning for the future:


“The best way to predict the future is to invent it.” – Alan Kay

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

A vid on a Nike "Fuel Band" is included, as many presentations were about Wellness programs successes and challenges, as well as preparing for the next phases of the Affordable Care Act.  ~  Deb

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Where and When does Big Make Sense?

Where and When does Big Make Sense? | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"An insider's view of the advance readers' edition of The End of Big: How the Internet Makes David the New Goliath by the super-smart Nicco Mele."

The book releases here in the U.S. on April 23, 2013. 


We are all struggling to figure out which big institutions make sense....And ...which are best torn down.


....While there are many exciting aspects of the end of big, ...there are also threats.   ....The rise of fringe groups such as the Tea Party and WikiLeaks are a result of the end of big because the Web rewards extremist views.


____________________

Without the Washington Post, would Woodward and Bernstein have emerged independently?

____________________


In journalism, if we no longer have big news gathering organizations, who is going to fund the big investigative story?


Without the Washington Post, would Woodward and Bernstein have emerged independently? Without the Watergate Scandal how would history have differed? These are questions worth asking.


The End of Big was not self-published. Nicco talks a lot about micro publishing but went with a big publisher (St. Martin's Press) for his own book.


But at the same time, Nicco is running EchoDitto his own small business and he also has a small publishing operation (his blog). 


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

A thoughtful post, a 2013 book that provokes new perspectives on "right-sizing"economics and culture in an environment with volatile markets. ~  Deb

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Success Case Study: Pitching a Learning Tool Directly to Professors

Success Case Study:  Pitching a Learning Tool Directly to Professors | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Instead of convincing universities to take a chance on its classroom engagement platform, Top Hat Monocle made direct contact with professors who asked students to also pick up the tab.


...most students carried mobile devices...which could be used for in-class interaction. [The founders] ...developed a prototype product that focused on quizzing and polling students, and pilot-tested the prototype in two classes.


_____________________

Large organizations have a very long sales cycle ... catch them outside of [their] budget cycle, you may not get another chance for a year or two.

_____________________



“Selling to large organizations like universities, governments and big corporations is difficult and time-consuming. Large organizations have a very long sales cycle and if you catch them outside of a budget cycle, you may not get another chance for a year or two.”



THE SOLUTION

The founders decided to “consumerize the classroom” by focusing on individual professors, rather than universities. This made sense because the value proposition was focused on the classroom and because professors have much latitude in making adoption decisions.

THE RESULT


This academic year, it is being used by 2,000 professors and more than 150,000 students at 300 universities worldwide. More than 80 per cent of these universities are in the United States.


The company has 75 employees, offices in three countries, and has been able to raise another $9.1-million in financing.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

If you've seen drug companies advertising in the media directly to you, vs. your doctor or health system, you've seen another angle on this.  How do innovative ideas take hold in your institution today?  ~  Deb

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The Professors, Yes, the MOOC Hype is Worth It: Disruption in Higher Ed

The Professors, Yes, the MOOC Hype is Worth It:  Disruption in Higher Ed | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Professors were asked, do they believe MOOCs "are worth the hype." 79% said yes.


===


In the largest survey of instructors who have taught massive open online courses, The Chronicle heard from critics, converts, and the cautious.

 

Hype around these new free online courses has grown louder and louder since a few professors at Stanford University drew hundreds of thousands of students to online computer-science courses in 2011.


Since then MOOCs, which charge no tuition and are open to anybody with Internet access, have been touted by reformers as a way to transform higher education and expand college access.


Many professors teaching MOOCs had a similarly positive outlook: Asked whether they believe MOOCs "are worth the hype," 79 percent said yes.


Via Smithstorian, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Related posts by Deb:


      
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 18, 2013 9:40 AM

There is some synchroncity here that this article is showing up while I'm listening to a professor at UM talk about Harvard choosing a MOOC for accounting for their entry level accounting (Brigham Young) and outsourcing professors.

Can paths to efficiency and worker health co-exist?

Professor:  Wally Hopp, Associate Dean for Faculty and Research Herrick Professor of Manufacturing, Ross School of Business   Positively Lean: A Path to Efficiency and Energization?


Examples:  Henry Ford, Joe at GM Powertrain, FelPro (300% ROI on Employee Benefits, no turnover > sold to Federal Mogul)


Key themes in the blend:

  • Share the gain
  • Appeal to pride
  • Cultivate a community
  • Pursue a higher purpose <motivation>  (Sugar water or change the world)

 

Apple >> Change the world

Patagonia  >> Corporate responsibility  (Don't buy what you don't need)
University of Michigan  Uncommon education for the common man  (President James Burrill Angell) 


Questions:

  • Is the key challenge aligning organization & employee benefits from efficiency gains?
  • Or is it cultivating a sense of higher purpose?
  • Or something completely different?    
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The Science of Success with Innovation Research

The Science of Success with Innovation Research | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"She started her own creativity and innovation consultancy company to do what was NOT being done, – using academic research to improve innovation in companies"


Amantha Imber wondered why the research she had read was not being applied to help firms innovate.


What was the use of having a body of scientific research, including proven drivers to innovation, if it was not being used to help companies grow?


“There was a gap between academic research and what happens ‘in the real world’,” she says.


_____________________

"..staff need to feel a sense of challenge. They also need to have the resources to deliver."

_____________________

Six years later the consultancy she founded, Inventium, is advising some of the world’s best-known corporations, including Coca-Cola Amatil, American Express, Qantas and Commonwealth Bank of Australia.


Inventium won this year’s BRW Client Choice Award for best management consulting firm. The awards are run by Beaton and are based on responses from more than 40,000 professional services clients to ensure their independence.


...“People talk about trying to build a culture of innovation. From analysis we know what sorts of elements need to be present,” Imber says.

“One of the most important is that staff need to feel a sense of challenge. They also need to have the resources to deliver.

People need to feel that risk-taking is allowed and failure is not terrible, but rather an opportunity to learn.”


She says there are keys to transforming ideas into realities.


“Crush assumptions,” she says. “Whenever we set out to solve a problem, we have assumptions that fence in our thinking.


By deliberately crushing assumptions and asking ‘What if the opposite was true?’ you can significantly increase your  creativity.”


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Quite the success story. Congratulations to Amantha Imber and the companies she's helped be successful. ~ Deb

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6 Emerging Technologies in Higher Education

6 Emerging Technologies in Higher Education | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Six (6) emerging technologies are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years."


The work is by the NMC Horizon Project, a decade-long research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in higher education.


Trends included in the short list of major changes in higher education include:

  • Flipped Classroom, 
  • MOOCs, Mobile Apps, 
  • Tablet Computing, 
  • Augmented Reality, 
  • Game-Based Learning, 
  • The Internet of Things, 
  • Learning Analytics, 
  • 3D Printing, 
  • Flexible Displays, 
  • Next Generation Batteries, 
  • Wearable Technology.  


The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI), an EDUCAUSE Program.


Related posts by Deb via REVELN:


   



Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Academe is one of the biggest, most obvious targets of disruptive innovation, and on-the-job education is an aspect of it, via the previous post by Christensen.  Here's what Educause has to say about it.  See my Social, peer learning & curation stream to learn about "Peer Learning Circles."  ~  D

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Chris Varley: Innovation: The Elephant in the Room

Chris Varley: Innovation: The Elephant in the Room | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

...Get to the task at hand:  Defining innovation in a way that is both meaningful and actionable


An innovation is a non-obvious solution to a problem (whether real or perceived) that, once it takes hold in the marketplace, not only becomes obvious but also becomes the new standard.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a smart piece on defining innovation, useful to institutions and anyone dealing with the devil in the details of definitions:


With some disruptive art history to illustrate, Chris Varley does a the job of breaking the definition of innovation down to its main parts and setting it up to some scrutiny.  ~  Deb

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Three Tenets of Mastering the Unknown, Leadership through Ambiguity

Three Tenets of Mastering the Unknown, Leadership through Ambiguity | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
“Those who struggle with ambiguity sometimes reach for false certainties just to appear decisive.”

If it is about sense-making in ambiguous business situations, I’m intrigued.


Randall White & Sandra Shullman have classic and newer information on dealing with ambiguity in leadership, both in 2010 and in 2012.


Highlights:


Using LSP  (Learning Sensory Preparedness) to succeed in your business:


1. LEARN:  Learn to make a decision with incomplete information.


    2. SENSE:   Train your mind to be fluid and attuned to faint signals of impending change. 

     
    3. PREPARE:   Examine five ideas or trends that you know nothing about, but that will affect the business in three to five years.


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    The original 2010 post of this article by both authors included the comment that mindset — more than personality and behavior — forms an observable pattern among some of the most successful leaders and that a fearless approach to uncertainty is required.  ~  Deb

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