Big Data, Challenging HR Beliefs, Empowering Worker Success | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Work history does not matter as much as we think it does, and bosses matter more — these are findings from an emerging field called work-force science."

  

...Work-force science, in short is what happens when Big Data meets H.R.

   

....“This is absolutely the way forward,” says Peter Cappelli, director of the Center for Human Resources at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. “Most companies have been flying completely blind.”

  

Today, every e-mail, instant message, phone call, line of written code and mouse-click leaves a digital signal. These patterns can now be inexpensively collected and mined for insights into how people work and communicate, potentially opening doors to more efficiency and innovation within companies.



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...research ...found that the most important characteristic for sales success is a kind of emotional courage...even after initially being told no.


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For example:


...Tim Geisert, chief marketing officer for I.B.M.’s Kenexa unit, observed that an outgoing personality has traditionally been assumed to be the defining trait of successful sales people.

But its research, based on millions of worker surveys and tests, as well as manager assessments, has found that the most important characteristic for sales success is a kind of emotional courage, a persistence to keep going even after initially being told no.



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...numbers and grades alone did not prove to spell success at Google and are no longer used as important hiring criteria....

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For years, [Google] candidates were screened according to SAT scores and college grade-point averages, metrics favored by its founders. But numbers and grades alone did not prove to spell success at Google and are no longer used as important hiring criteria....

Google has found that the most innovative workers — also the “happiest,” by its definition — are those who have a strong sense of mission about their work and who also feel that they have much personal autonomy.