Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
3.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Where innovation is happening beyond the stuff of small start-ups & tech companies. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation and careers, SUBSCRIBE to REVELN.com/Tools/
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Streamlining by Going Online with Faculty Promotion and Tenure Resources

Streamlining by Going Online with Faculty Promotion and Tenure Resources | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Facing the administrative burden of promotion/tenure for roughly 240 candidates each year, the University of Florida developed an online promotion and tenure work process.

   

....Outcomes
After only a year and a half of full implementation, outcomes have included:

  • a 90 percent reduction in paper, 
  • a reduction in printing and administrative costs, 
  • a marked reduction in work time for faculty and staff, 
  • consistency and conformance within the tenure review process, 
  • easier accessibility to promotion and tenure packets for academic reviewers, 
  • improved transparency at all review levels, and 
  • the ability for tenure candidates to monitor their progress throughout the cycle. 

      
The cost savings for the first year alone was nearly $203,000.


Related posts by Deb:
      

         

        


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here's a university that did something to update the wasteful and inefficient tenure review process.  This included reducing paper-intensive practices by 90% and providing progress reports to tenure candidates.

     

It remains to be seen how other universities handle the larger promotion and tenure process in the 21st century, connected with changes in higher education as a whole.  ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

The Facebook Business Model, Really? University Courses, Build Now, Money Later

The Facebook Business Model, Really?  University Courses, Build Now, Money Later | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Something ununusual is happening in usually glacially-paced universities; they are investing in a start-up strategy: "Build fast and worry about money later."

  

There is some controvery that access to free courses does not a degree make, and that, after all, this could be a grand marketing scheme with questionable motives. Degrees are still in demand as much as they ever were.

  

_____________________

   

"[It's] a new educational plutocracy where the "rich" are enabled and embraced, and the middling and lower classes are given scraps ...so that they can participate, but perhaps not really benefit.  ~  Stacey Simmons

_____________________

    


"By denying qualified people (meaning those who have completed the work) access to degrees or some other endorsement, institutions are establishing a new educational plutocracy where the "rich" are enabled and embraced, and the middling and lower classes are given scraps by which they might educate themselves so that they can participate, but perhaps not really benefit, and certainly never enter the world of the elite. ~ Stacey Simmons, one of Fast Companies "Most Creative People"

  

If you've seen the movie: The Social Network, you'll know that that using Facebook as a business model is not unknown to higher education. However something ununusual is happening in usually glacially-paced universities; they are investing in a start-up strategy: "Build fast and worry about money later."

   

Excerpted:    

   

Coursera is following an approach popular among Silicon Valley start-ups: Build fast and worry about money later. Venture capitalists—and even two universities—have invested more than $22-million in the effort already.

   

_____________________


But, does it change their lives for the better?
_____________________


"Our VC's keep telling us that if you build a Web site that is changing the lives of millions of people, then the money will follow," says Daphne Koller, the company's other co-founder, who is also a professor at Stanford.

    

====


Deb: But, does it change their lives for the better?  Stanford, of course, had one of the first professors to jump ship to offer a large, free course to the world.  


  • Sebastian Thrun, an adjunct professor of computer science at Stanford who invited the world to attend his fall semester artificial intelligence course and who ended up with 160,000 online students, announced he had decided to stop teaching at Stanford and direct all his teaching activities through Udacity, a start-up he co-founded that will offer online courses from leading professors to millions of students.


Stacey Simmons, CEO & Founder at Omnicademy, questions the motivations of offering free courses if degrees from prestigious institutions are not accessible to the many.  On the other hand, it could be an amazing new education model, per her TED conversation here.

     
    
My own alma mater, University of Michigan, has been among the first to invest.

Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education, How an Upstart Company Might Profit from Free Courses


More about Deb's tools & skills are here:
Planning & Strategy Retreats
Presentation Videos
Deb's mothership:  The REVELN website

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Game-based Learning & Higher Education, Jane McGonigal & TED | Online Universities

Game-based Learning & Higher Education, Jane McGonigal & TED | Online Universities | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

McGonigal’s hypothesis for higher education is that, if we can create engaging and fun games based on meaningful real world problems, we have the ability to leverage an incredible amount of energy and passion to solve the world’s biggest problems.


Urgent Optimism, Social Fabric, Blissful productivity and Epic Meaning are the four tenets proposed by game designer Jane McGonigal in her TED talk.  


Game-based learning is beginning to happen in the public schools. The work of Katie Salen and her Quest2Learn school in NYC and the work of University of Wisconsin gaming researcher Kurt Squire are two notable examples of the power of gaming in education and the impact that it can have on learning.


However, educational institutions are notoriously slow to change. The good news is that they may not be able to hold back a wave of change that is about to crest. Gaming has become an increasingly important part of culture and its spread into public education means that students entering college in the next several years are going to have an expectation that gaming will be a part of the college curriculum.


If higher education does not adapt to meet this demand, it may find itself in even deeper trouble than it already is as potential students seek alternative paths to have their interests satisfied. If an initiative such as the MacArthur Foundation’s digital badges takes hold, game-based learning may become an acceptable, even accredited, alternative path to higher education.


If that happens, the dams will burst and the most significant changes in education since the Industrial Revolution will sweep away previous notions of what learning looked like.


Photo credit:  by annais, Flickr Creative Commons


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Success Case Study: Pitching a Learning Tool Directly to Professors

Success Case Study:  Pitching a Learning Tool Directly to Professors | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Instead of convincing universities to take a chance on its classroom engagement platform, Top Hat Monocle made direct contact with professors who asked students to also pick up the tab.


...most students carried mobile devices...which could be used for in-class interaction. [The founders] ...developed a prototype product that focused on quizzing and polling students, and pilot-tested the prototype in two classes.


_____________________

Large organizations have a very long sales cycle ... catch them outside of [their] budget cycle, you may not get another chance for a year or two.

_____________________



“Selling to large organizations like universities, governments and big corporations is difficult and time-consuming. Large organizations have a very long sales cycle and if you catch them outside of a budget cycle, you may not get another chance for a year or two.”



THE SOLUTION

The founders decided to “consumerize the classroom” by focusing on individual professors, rather than universities. This made sense because the value proposition was focused on the classroom and because professors have much latitude in making adoption decisions.

THE RESULT


This academic year, it is being used by 2,000 professors and more than 150,000 students at 300 universities worldwide. More than 80 per cent of these universities are in the United States.


The company has 75 employees, offices in three countries, and has been able to raise another $9.1-million in financing.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

If you've seen drug companies advertising in the media directly to you, vs. your doctor or health system, you've seen another angle on this.  How do innovative ideas take hold in your institution today?  ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

RELENTLESS! Reinventing Higher Education, Southern New Hampshire University @SNHU via Fast Company

RELENTLESS!  Reinventing Higher Education,  Southern New Hampshire University @SNHU via Fast Company | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"As president of Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU), LeBlanc is ...using technology to transform an 80-year-old college into a modern education powerhouse."


I tweeted about @SNHU over a year ago, as I was intrigued they had an MBA in Social Media.  However, it led to a conversation with several people at the institution.  


After experiencing a considerable amount of the hidebound nature of the ivory tower of higher education, the experience I had with SNHU was a breath of fresh air, informed by data and, could it be, skilled process?


New England is the land of the ivies.   So much the better for @SNHU (their twitter handle) to leverage what they do as they think & implement differently.


Stay tuned, an interview may soon follow...


Excerpts:

Founded in 1932 as the New Hampshire School of Accounting and Secretarial Science, SNHU was a modest school when Le­Blanc joined as president in 2003, recognized for its culinary arts, business, and justice programs. Its online program was, as LeBlanc puts it, "a sleepy operation on a nondescript corner of the main campus. I thought it was squandering an opportunity."


That little operation has turned into SNHU’s Center for Online and Continuing Education (COCE), the largest online-degree provider in New England.


Its 10,600 students are enrolled in 120 graduate and undergraduate programs and specialties, everything from a sustainability-focused MBA to a creative-writing BA.


Fifty more programs will be launched this year, and the COCE recently tested TV ads in national markets such as Raleigh, North Carolina; Milwaukee; and Oklahoma City.


LeBlanc hopes that by 2014 SNHU will boast the country’s biggest online not-for-profit education system.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Universities should be innovative, academic says

Universities should be innovative, academic says | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
‘Meeting the needs of society is crucial'...

"Universities have to work and stitch around the community's needs. Otherwise we will continue to be seen as ivory towers."

Research incubators
Universities also have to move from the realm of research to commercial business opportunities, said Gabriel, and this means taking ideas beyond the laboratory.

Ways to do this include technology transfer offices and seeking funding to build research incubators but these activities need to have the end user in mind.

Gabriel said Abu Dhabi and the UAE, which has seen new institutions and companies established, are in a position to do things and think about who benefits from teaching and research.

According to Gabriel, universities can achieve economic success by having:

* Specialisation and differentiation — recognising true institutional excellence
Focused graduate programme expansions that feed into priority areas

* New approach to faculty contract length and compensation to attract and retain top-notch researchers and scientists

* Incorporate intellectual property approaches that maximise economic benefit and encourage entrepreneurs.
more...
No comment yet.