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Be Constructive—Not Invasive—With Big Data, The WSJ Experts Stream

Be Constructive—Not Invasive—With Big Data, The WSJ Experts Stream | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Two perspectives:  1) ...the real risk in a hyper-data world is use that crosses the line between constructive and invasive, and 2) that people will use it naively, and to mistake correlation.

   

Angela Ahrendts:  The security dimensions of Big Data are well rehearsed, and protection must be a given. ...the real risk in a hyper-data world is use that crosses the line between constructive and invasive.

  

For us, Big Data must be about serving our customers’ interests, rather than our own.

      

….Customer information should work for the customer, making every retail experience a great retail experience...    Appropriately protected and intelligently used, we believe it can do just that.

  

Angela Ahrendts (@AngelaAhrendts) is the CEO of Burberry.


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Figuring out what causes what, and why and under what circumstances is hard work. Big Data is a tool for this work, not a substitute for it.

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Andrew McAfee:  ... Big data’s great promise is that it’ll get us out of ....decision-making by HiPPO—the Highest-Paid Person’s Opinion. ... In the same way that witch doctors gave way to actual doctors as medicine became a science, HiPPOs will in many domains give way to data-driven decision making.


Many people accurately perceive that Big Data will give rise to privacy concerns, but I want to highlight a different risk:


  • That people will use it naively, and to mistake correlation (“as the geese fly away, the weather gets colder”) with causation (“the geese are causing winter!”). Figuring out what causes what, and why and under what circumstances is hard work. Big Data is a tool for this work, not a substitute for it.


Andrew McAfee ( @amcafee ), a principal research scientist at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the co-author of the e-book “Race Against the Machine: How the Digital Revolution is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity, and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy.”



Recent posts by Deb:  

  


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've already received a comment on my LinkedIn stream about the invasiveness of big data and employee email.  Here's two more perspectives on using Big Data well.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 25, 2013 7:41 AM

This article from this past April offers a way to see beyond the "shiny new toy" syndrome of the Big Data buzzwords, to help it be the tool it's meant to be.  ~  Deb

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Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems

Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Recent research reveals that people are more capable of mental novelty when thinking on behalf of others than for themselves.

 

Great piece on enriching the field of view and other perspectives, something we also encourage in executive coaching.  


________________________


...abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. ...But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite.

________________________


Excerpts:

 

Over the years, social scientists have found that abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. That means that if we care about innovation we need to be more abstract and therefore more distant. But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite. We intensify our focus rather than widen our view. We draw closer rather than step back.

 

That's a mistake, Polman and Emich suggest. "That decisions for others are more creative than decisions for the self... should prove of considerable interest to negotiators, managers, product designers, marketers and advertisers, among many others," they write.

 

Dan Pink's suggestions, excerpted:

  

• Recruit more independent directors.   Begin with corporate governance. 

~ having independent directors on the boards of public companies. 

 

• Rethink the structure of your firm.

Perhaps loose alliances of distantly connected people

 

• Harness the power of peers.

....assemble a small group of peers – all from different industries – and gather periodically to exchange ideas and offer solutions from new perspectives.

 

• Find a problem-swapping partner.

Find a friend or colleague with whom you can occasionally swap problems...

 

• Disasssociate yourself.

Imagine you're doing it for someone else...


Full article here

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Creating your Own Luck to Build a Successful Innovation Culture, the Innovator's Mindset

Creating your Own Luck to Build a Successful Innovation Culture, the Innovator's Mindset | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Is it a mindset of creating your own luck that sets innovative organizations apart?"


Do the featured characteristics of innovative cultures in organizations follow the make-your-own-luck characteristics listed in this article?   See if you agree that it's about having a certain mindset translated to culture:


Excerpted:


...Having a positive, innovator’s mindset actually CREATES success, and luck.


In The Luck Factor (Miramax, 2003) professor Richard Wiseman, from the University of Hertfordshire, details his research providing the following insight – Luck (or success) comes to those who embrace and embody four essential principles:


Creating luck by noticing and acting on opportunities,
Expecting that one can create luck through perseverance,
‣ Making decisions which are informed by the well honed intuition, and
‣ Resisting the negative by finding and even creating the bright side of every situation


The post author, Bradley Bendle, also cites several other recent innovation books including a model from Andy Stefanovich in Look at More (Jossey-Bass, 2011) and his five M’s framework (Mood, Mindset, Mechanisms, Measurement, Momentum.)


Like other posts on his site, the post is rich in citations plus the author's own spin and distillation based on his innovation readings including his view of the Innovator’s Mindset as being comprised of following six reinforcing domains:


1) Alertness
2) Curiousness
3) Willingness
4) Joy
5) Desire
6) Drive



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Simple solution innovations that saved infant lives in Mumbai ~ including Bubble Wrap | Kinsey

Simple solution innovations that saved infant lives in Mumbai ~ including Bubble Wrap | Kinsey | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

From Kinsey:  There's no doubt that groundbreaking inventions and discoveries have moved the world forward, but sometimes, a small innovation can be just as powerful.

Simple, low-cost innovations can yield dramatic gains. Instead of expensive technology, these solutions require only a deep understanding of the problem, a strong desire to create change, and a lot of common sense.


Using this kind of thinking, Armida Fernandez cut infant mortality almost in half at a Mumbai hospital that serves the city’s poorest residents.


Click on the title to read the full story.

 

Photo credit:  mollypop via Flickr CC

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Useful perspective that the technology tools may be the problem, and solving it with bubble wrap.

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What It Takes to Be a Serial Innovator INSIDE established companies

What It Takes to Be a Serial Innovator INSIDE established companies | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Researchers discuss the characteristics of people who successfully develop significant innovations in established companies."


Why serial innovators are fairly rare:  The low percentage make sense as the qualities needed are difficult to nourish in many corporate cultures.


Excerpt:


Serial innovators, whom the authors define as people who develop and bring to market at least two successful breakthrough products in an established company, are not all that common.


Griffin, Price and Vojak estimate that they represent anywhere from one in 50 members of an R&D and engineering staff at a smaller organization to one in 200 at a larger organization — and perhaps as few as one in 500 at most Fortune 200 companies.


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   ...willingness and ability to “cross the bridge,” ...taking on the organizational politics required to convince others ...of the value of their innovation

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Typical characteristics of serial innovators:

  

  • a track record of technical excellence (which helps them gain freedom to innovate within their organizations) and 
    
  • a strong focus on solving important problems for customers (which helps them choose commercially relevant problems to tackle). 
  
  • They also have a willingness and ability to “cross the bridge,” as the authors put it, from merely inventing a good solution to taking on the organizational politics required to convince others in the company of the value of their innovation. 

     

  • curiosity and 
   
  • systems thinking => integrate disparate data and information, creatively connect the dots in logical and powerful ways.

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Better Thinking by Not Thinking: Accessing your Unconsciousness - Liz Guthridge

Better Thinking by Not Thinking:  Accessing your Unconsciousness - Liz Guthridge | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Where do you do your best thinking? Anywhere but your desk, if you’re like most knowledge workers and leaders. And probably not at work either. Not thinking, but relaxing into your unconscious can produce better thinking."

 

Change colleague Liz Guthridge has a winner of a post on accessing quality thinking by simply not thinking for a spell.  Techniques of mindful meditation, rest (or siesta, as I'd prefer from my Argentine side), as well as just stepping away for a break can contribute to a fresh view and insights from the deep well of our unconscious. ~ DN

 

Excerpts:

 

_________________________

 

Individuals tend to get good ideas while driving, exercising, reading, meditating or talking to others.

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That’s because we automatically tap into our unconsciousness to do most of our thinking. It doesn’t require effort on our part, as David Rock explains. Even better, our unconsciousness—which can seem as vast as the Milky Way—makes powerful connections for us.

  

...Offices are not brain-friendly settings.

  

Her steps to access include:

  

1. Quiet your brain. Start by putting aside all of the electronic gadgets that stimulate you and your brain. You also may want to close your eyes.

  

2. Let your mind wander. (DN:  Mindfulness practices teaches us to observe thoughts, but to NOT engage them.)

  

3. Put yourself in a positive state. 

 

4. Do something else other than work on the issue, problem or dilemma you’re facing. 

  

===

  

Read Liz's post in full here, which includes my commentary on accessing both the Jungian appreciation of the unconcious and using tools, like the MBTI used at the second level of functioning.


~  Deb


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Open Source Tackles eHealthcare Records In Places Microsoft Can't

Open Source Tackles eHealthcare Records In Places Microsoft Can't | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

" if a midwife is juggling three deliveries at a time, recording the details isn’t high on the list of priorities," especially in underdeveloped countries.


This use of open source technology reminds me of a systemic innovation by a doctor who's innovation cut premature infant mortality almost in half in Mumbai.  Innovation in underdeveloped countries has lessons for us all.


Excerpt:


eHealth Nigeria is using an open source health records system to create digital records of births a happening across northern Nigeria each day.


Under the aegis of their nonprofit, eHealth Nigeria, Castle and Thompson have built a digital records system meant to eventually serve healthcare facilities across northern Nigeria, but it doesn't use the sort of specialized health care software in U.S. or even everyday database software.


There's no Kaiser software. And no Microsoft.


The system is based on OpenMRS, an open source health records system designed specifically for use in underdeveloped regions. 



Read more via wired.com, click on the article title / link for the full story

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