Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Disruptive Technology and Innovation Requires Change Management & New Talent Strategy

Disruptive Technology and Innovation Requires Change Management & New Talent Strategy | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
HR professionals know that anything that causes business disruptions is certain to have implications for human resource management, including the growth of 3-D printing.


I admit I'm looking forward to it. I think the 3-D printer is such a disruptive technology that I want to be in on the fun.


______________________
   

...The teenager found the plans on the Internet. Imagine, open-sourced body parts!

    

______________________

   


The news reports range from 3-D printing an iPhone case to high-heel shoes, or models of body parts on which doctors can practice.


...my favorite use of the technology so far goes to a teenager who used a 3-D printer at a local library to build a prosthetic hand for a boy who was born without fingers. The hand opens and closes and can even hold a pencil. The teenager found the plans on the Internet. Imagine, open-sourced body parts!


Implications for HR leaders? 
  

McKinsey recently issued a report highlighting some of the business disruptions that are likely to result from this new technology.



______________________

   

... there may be very specific, and difficult to find, talent requirements for such a shift, and begin to devise a talent-development and sourcing strategy to meet the [need]

   

______________________

   

3-D technology  -- aka additive manufacturing -- is likely to accelerate product development.  ... Value may not come from manufacturing a product; it may come from being able to add uniqueness to the design alone.

   

  • Don't wait until someone tells you it might have an impact: Know the business well enough to raise the issue if no one has mentioned it already. 
     
  • Help the executive team consider the strategic implications of the technology and whether it can be leveraged to the business' advantage or whether the business needs to be prepared to meet new forms of competition.
    
  • Recognize that there may be very specific, and difficult to find, talent requirements for such a shift, and begin to devise a talent-development and sourcing strategy to meet the skilled-worker needs of a new manufacturing strategy.

 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a quality article emphasizing the need to be ready for adaptive change, perhaps fast.  As author Susan R. Meisinger suggests, be "not only be prepared to manage the change, ...be leaders within the organization in embracing and driving change."  I'd add, create a learning environment now with leadership at all levels to empower your ability to change together.  Share what's important to be ready.  ~  D

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Bill Gates Futuring and HR/Recruiting Stuck in a Time Warp

Bill Gates Futuring and HR/Recruiting Stuck in a Time Warp | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Bill Gates has been in the media of late with “My Plan to Fix the World’s Biggest Problems.”


Gates’ solution is about continuous improvement.  However ...as Gates’ says, this is simple in concept, but often difficult to execute.  

  


Excerpts:
  
While times have changed for most business functions, it seems that the HR and recruiting departments are stuck in a time warp, circa 1975.

  

1) Stop using skills and experience-based job descriptions.... Instead require the hiring manager to define the job in terms of 6-8 measurable performance objectives.


2) Measure the hiring manager’s ability to attract, develop and retain top people.


3) Never interview more than four people for any job.


4) Define Quality of Hire before the person’s hired based on a performance-based job description.


Related article from Deb:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The author of this article uses HR and recruiting as an example of old practices that need updating as good hires (and good talent development and succession planning) are the front door to smart, high performance cultures.

Balanced scorecards began to be used for the very reason of taking HR's people hire impact into a balanced account of measurement, beyond finance to internal business, learning and growth.


Using performance based job descriptions and innovation (refurbishing boring jobs) can be transforming to organizations still working from a 70's model of HR.

Be aware, overdoing metrics also has drawbacks, such auto companies over-relying on measurement, via ill-conceived management purges (that also appeared age-driven.)  Staffers served in roles as mentors that also produced lower numbers in their metrics because they were taking time to help newly hired and learning youngers.  The lack of a systemic focus lowered productivity and morale at the same time.  

~ Deb

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Spaces for Innovation
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The world's most creative cities > Does it translate to Innovation?

The world's most creative cities > Does it translate to Innovation? | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Tel Aviv, London, Sydney, Stockholm and Shanghai are booming with talent.


Because creativity is cultural.  [And so} the Martin Prosperity Institute at U of T’s Rotman School of Management has been studying the complex web of factors that encourage and sustain innovation in regions around the world.


The institute’s Global Creativity Index, first published in 2004,  measures a nation’s innovation potential, focusing on what it calls the Three Ts: technology, talent and tolerance.


"The GCI is really trying to help regions understand where they are," explains Kevin Stolarick, research director of the Martin Prosperity Institute. "Even when times are good, you have to worry about what comes next."


These  five cities —and some of their start-ups—are on the docket for having very bright futures.


Via Karen Steffensen
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The Tipping Point between Structure & Innovation

The Tipping Point between Structure & Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Somewhere between the two extremes exists a tipping point – a place where full creativity and the lack of structure reaches a balance with purposeful, valuable and necessary structures and processes."


____________________

Balancing structure and freedom, processes and creativity is an art, not a science.  ____________________

Move much more toward additional structure and you begin to limit and stifle creativity and innovation outcomes. 


Move much more toward freedom and creativity and you lose the ability to manage, develop and commercialize ideas. Where does the tipping point reside?


Your innovation activities need enough structure to identify and commercialize great ideas effectively, but not so much structure that people are stymied or slowed by processes, forms and decisions. 


In organizations where purposeful innovation is fairly new, the tipping point is closer to the regimented side, since there are few widely distributed capabilities or tools. As an organization gains experience innovating, the structure and rigidity become less important, as innate skills and culture learn to shape and manage ideas more effectively.


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Photo:  by lambdachialpha Flickr CC
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's the art of deciding how to get the balance right: SO MANY businesses along with newbie or ill-informed managers stifle creativity, resulting in rampant mediocrity, morale problems and talent loss. Turn it around from victim, persecutor roles to encourager, challenger, collaborator, coach of your innovators.  ~  D

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HR is ripe for social disruption. Innovating HR structure to support peer learning, innovative organizations

HR is ripe for social disruption.  Innovating HR structure to support peer learning, innovative organizations | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Is it finally time for Social HR? What's out there that uses social systems to revitalize how people are recruited and learn, grow and develop within organizations?


If organizations tend to be hidebound against change, Human Resources (HR) is even more so, in spite of the trendy strategic HR spin of the early 2000's . Consider HR's roots, which persist today: labor relations, compensation, employment/personnel and the number of lawyers on staff.


Here's some fresh thinking about embracing social as a new definer of HR systems from Gautam Ghosh.


Excerpted, adapted:


Recruitment:  HR has been quick to leverage social media to “Broadcast” vacancies. The next level would be actively creating and nurturing communities of practice shaped around skills where hiring managers can gauge level of skills of people and also develop them (Disclaimer: The author works with BraveNewTalent, a platform that helps organizations do that)


Knowledge Sharing: Forget the idea of databases acting as “repositories” of knowledge, internal social networks can capture employees work activity as social intranets  – and team members can follow what others are doing on their activity streams. Newer tools like Opzi and MindQuilt can also emerge as a enterprise version of Quora, the popular Q&A site.


HR policies: Using a social tool which leverages crowdsourcing ideas from employees can help HR in co-creating processes and policies – and raise acceptability when they are finally rolled out. Dell’s EmployeeStorm is a great example by which employees give ideas on everything in the company.


From the autho, Gautam Ghosh, a Product Evangelist and India Marketing Lead at BraveNewTalent specializing in the areas of HR, organization development and learning and employee engagement. He has worked as a HR Generalist and a Learning and Development Executive in firms like Deloitte, Dell, Hewlett Packard and Satyam Computer Services."

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Talent is irrelevant ? (and so 1971 ) What makes for a talented group and innovative result?

Talent is irrelevant ? (and so 1971 ) What makes for a talented group and innovative result? | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

At least, the author admits, talent is less relevant TODAY in this blog post:


  • Less work is being done by individuals and more work is being done by groups. 
  • Nobel prizes are increasingly awarded to multiple individuals, research papers increasingly cite numerous individuals
  • Inside our organizations more projects and objectives are anchored to groups of people. 
==

Individual ability / competence / talent are one variable among many in the equation. Putting a group of talented individuals at a table together does not make a talented group.


Relational skills, communication skills, empathy, flexibility…all of these are part of the equation as well.  And so is diversity.


Very likely our three most wasted assets inside the organization are knowledge, perspectives and heuristics…the stuff inside a persons brain, the mash up of their identity and experience.


When you bring a group together to do serious work, the bigger your aggregate collection of knowledge, perspectives and heuristics is, the more likely you are to have access to the tools necessary to generate an optimal result and the less likely you are to be limited and compromised by shared blind spots.

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