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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Big Data, Challenging HR Beliefs, Empowering Worker Success

Big Data, Challenging HR Beliefs, Empowering Worker Success | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Work history does not matter as much as we think it does, and bosses matter more — these are findings from an emerging field called work-force science."

  

...Work-force science, in short is what happens when Big Data meets H.R.

   

....“This is absolutely the way forward,” says Peter Cappelli, director of the Center for Human Resources at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. “Most companies have been flying completely blind.”

  

Today, every e-mail, instant message, phone call, line of written code and mouse-click leaves a digital signal. These patterns can now be inexpensively collected and mined for insights into how people work and communicate, potentially opening doors to more efficiency and innovation within companies.



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...research ...found that the most important characteristic for sales success is a kind of emotional courage...even after initially being told no.


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For example:


...Tim Geisert, chief marketing officer for I.B.M.’s Kenexa unit, observed that an outgoing personality has traditionally been assumed to be the defining trait of successful sales people.

But its research, based on millions of worker surveys and tests, as well as manager assessments, has found that the most important characteristic for sales success is a kind of emotional courage, a persistence to keep going even after initially being told no.



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...numbers and grades alone did not prove to spell success at Google and are no longer used as important hiring criteria....

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For years, [Google] candidates were screened according to SAT scores and college grade-point averages, metrics favored by its founders. But numbers and grades alone did not prove to spell success at Google and are no longer used as important hiring criteria....

Google has found that the most innovative workers — also the “happiest,” by its definition — are those who have a strong sense of mission about their work and who also feel that they have much personal autonomy.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This may explain a few things, and encourage more focus on the hiring process and less on over-managing what comes after.  ~  D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 21, 2013 11:04 PM

There are many implications for using the results for also helping individuals find more successful and satisfying career paths as well.  ~  D

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Will they Pay? Degrees & UnBundling: Massive online courses not a game changing innovation > Competency building is

Will they Pay?  Degrees & UnBundling: Massive online courses not a game changing innovation > Competency building is | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Higher ed disrupters:  It may not be what it seems, Alice.   It's the unbundling and competency building that makes the difference.


As shared on this curation stream, with higher education seeming like one of the next bubbles to burst, due to high cost, ossified bureacracies and the like, there is more to the story.


The context, if you've missed it, is further below.   Meanwhile, here's a few other things to consider having to do with profitability, the value of a degree & unbundling - several key concepts for these changing times for higher education:


Excerpted:


If you build it, will they pay?

...when the chattering class meets Professor Thrun, it’s love at first sight. The notion that they might take a Stanford course for free recalls their youthful days at similar elite universities


...educational romantics already have degrees. And when Udacity begins charging even modest fees for its courses, Professor Thrun may find this group resistant to paying for lifelong learning.


"Degrees are definitely not disappearing; they’re not even in decline."

...in developing economies, where there is truly a hunger for knowledge in any form and where the degree may not yet be as central to the evaluation of prospective employees [like it is in the US], the wage premium from a bachelor’s degree is even higher [than the US]:

  • 124 percent in Mexico,
  • 171 percent in Brazil and
  • 200 percent in China,
  • compared with a mere 62 percent in the U.S.
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Unbundling & Building Success in Competencies are the Innovation

Salman Khan's popular on-line Khan Academy videos teach a single concept.

  • Stanford Professor Thrun’s (reference below) online course builds on Khan’s innovation, and the resulting andragogy is remarkable.


Professor Thrun had to say in his announcement, excerpted:


We really set up our students for failure. We don’t help students to become smart.


Grades are the failure of the education system.  ...So rather than grading students, my task was to make students successful.


We changed the course so the questions were still hard, but students could attempt them multiple times. And when they finally got them right, they would get their A+. And it was much better.


Today, when someone fails, we don’t take time to make them a strong student. We give them a C or a D, move them to the next class. Then they’re branded a loser, and they’re set up for failure. This medium has the potential to change all that.


Context, excerpted:

The news media has been abuzz over two higher education developments:


1) MIT announces an extension of its successful OpenCourseWare initiative and that it will offer certificates to students who complete courses. MITx will allow students to access content for free. Students who wish to receive a certificate will be charged a modest fee for the requisite assessments,  issued under the name MIT.


2) Sebastian Thrun, an adjunct professor of computer science at Stanford who invited the world to attend his fall semester artificial intelligence course and who ended up with 160,000 online students, announced he had decided to stop teaching at Stanford and direct all his teaching activities through Udacity, a start-up he co-founded that will offer online courses from leading professors to millions of students.


He called the experience of reaching so many students life-changing: “Having done this, I can’t teach at Stanford again. I feel there’s a red pill and a blue pill. And you can take the blue pill and go back to your classroom and lecture your 20 students. But I’ve taken the red pill, and I’ve seen Wonderland.”


Read more via InsideHigherEd.com


Photo credit: DaBok, Flickr cc

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Thrivers who Beat Innovation's Toll on the American Corporation | Wall Street Journal

Thrivers who Beat Innovation's Toll on the American Corporation | Wall Street Journal | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Creative destruction is looming over companies like Kodak and Barnes & Noble, focusing American executive minds on two questions:

  1. Are large companies able to innovate quickly enough in an age of rapid disruption?
  2. And if they can, how do they do it?


This WSJ article offers up what I've seen as a recurring theme: 

  • The large companies that do manage to survive are ruthless about change.
  • The most successful ones aren't afraid to cannibalize their big revenue generators to build new businesses.


Thrivers: 

  • Johnson & Johnson, founded in 1886
  • International Business Machines Corp. just celebrated its 100th birthday
  • 35-year-old Apple Inc. has transformed itself from a small PC maker into a kingpin of mobile devices
  • Google Corp., founded in 1998, is finding new ways to grow beyond its core search engine advertising business


Top executives at successful big companies are a lot like those at small companies, said James W. Breyer, a partner at Facebook Inc. investor Accel Partners and a director at Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Dell Inc.


Mr. Breyer described these executives as very smart, and able to diversify into new businesses while staying focused on a company's core.




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Global Innovation Challenge: 160 Yr. Old Parent Challenges Freudenberg North America to Target Zero Manufacturing Waste

Global Innovation Challenge:  160 Yr. Old Parent Challenges Freudenberg North America to Target Zero Manufacturing Waste | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Freudenberg's North America companies are targeting zero manufacturing waste in response to a challenge set by parent corporation, Freudenberg and Co., during a recent internal Global Innovation Forum on raw materials and innovation."


Going green in the North America continues to be an important business goals for companies, including the long time global veteran, Freudenberg and Company.


Excerpt:


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Freudenberg has a 160-year history of conducting its business with integrity and a commitment to the welfare of its plant communities.

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In an ambitious drive to reach zero manufacturing waste ...Freudenberg North America's 16 companies will pursue processes that focus on ...recycling, lower water and energy consumption and increased use of sustainable materials over the next decade.


"All of the companies are engaged in implementing processes and programs that will improve the environmental sustainability of their products and plants," said Leesa Smith, president, Freudenberg North America Limited Partnership.


"The confluence of new environmental challenges and this long-standing corporate culture is pushing our people to develop green industrial innovations that will help solidify our success - and the health of our communities - into the next century."


Freudenberg-NOK Sealing Technologies, in Plymouth, Mich., is pursuing dozens of technological innovations aimed at reducing the company's reliance on scare natural resources, lowering vehicle emissions, improving engine and transmission performance, supporting development of wind and solar energy and incorporating more recycled content in its products.


Some examples from the Plymouth company:


  • Low Emission Sealing Solutions (LESS) components use one quarter of the energy a conventional radial shaft seal uses, thereby reducing fuel consumption and lowering vehicle emissions.


  • FluoroXprene® fluoroelastomers are a unique group of newly-developed materials that bridge the technology gap between PTFE and rubber while substantially reducing CO2 emissions and energy usage. FluoroXprene materials are completely recyclable. 
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  • The company is also pursuing ultraviolet (UV)-curable sealants that will reduce energy consumption, lower Co2 emissions and reduce cycle times.


Read the full press release story here.

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Beware the Entrepreneur's Recoil, Toxic to Innovation

Beware the Entrepreneur's Recoil, Toxic to Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"When we pull back, stop innovating ourselves and rebuff innovation and creativity from employees, we create an idea-killer emotional virus that destroys the very culture that got us where we are. "


Great piece on dealing with the cycles of innovation, success, risk.  Entrepreneurs get to be SO good at dealing with barriers, problems, set-backs and failures that success itself becomes another hurdle to overcome.


Excerpted, Jonathan Fields:


One of the biggest misses in the entrepreneurial process and mind is the assumption that mindset and willingness to embrace risk and creativity are fixed traits. In fact, the more successful most people become, the more they abandon the very mindset that fueled their success.


I call this the Entrepreneur’s Recoil.


So when you start a business, you adopt a do or die, all-in mindset. You come up with and are open to crazy ideas in the name of creating breakout businesses. And you’re willing to act on them. Because, beyond ego, even if you fail, the fall really won’t cause that much pain.


But, then something happens. You succeed.


Your mindset begins to shift into what famed psychologist and winner of the Nobel Prize for behavioral psychology, Daniel Kahneman, calls loss aversion mode.


1)  Rather than being driven by what you can build, create and have, you are overwhelmed by a fear of losing what you’ve already amassed.


2) Loss avoidance cultivates a strong negative creativity bias that makes us say no to innovative ideas.


When we pull back, stop innovating ourselves and rebuff innovation and creativity from employees, we create an idea-killer emotional virus that destroys the very culture that got us where we are. It breeds loss-aversion, fear and scarcity, which is death to innovation and expansion.


So...

Take a step backand ask a big question -
“Am I operating from a place of creative opportunity or loss aversion?”


Photo credit:  sean dreilinger, Flickr

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