Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Google Reveals Its 9 Principles of Innovation

Google Reveals Its 9 Principles of Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

What makes Google the holy grail of productivity and creativity? Take a look at their nine core principles of innovation.  


Excerpts:


1. INNOVATION COMES FROM ANYWHERE

...top down as well as bottom up, and in the places you least expect.


...a medical doctor on Google’s staff argued persuasively that Google had a moral obligation to extend help to those typing searches under the phrase "how to commit suicide." He ignited the charge to adjust the search engine's response so that the top of the screen reveals the toll free phone number for the National Suicide Prevention Hotline. The call volume went up by nine percent soon thereafter. The same change has been adopted in many other countries.


3. AIM TO BE TEN TIMES BETTER

..aim...to improve things by ten percent, you will only see incremental change. ...think 10 times improvement, and that will force you to think outside the box.


...n 2004, Google started its Google Books project and set forth a challenge to organize all the world's information and digitize all the books ever printed in history.


...Google has now scanned 30 million of the 130 million books they first set out to scan, and dozens of libraries around the world are participating in the project.


4. BET ON TECHNICAL INSIGHTS

Every organization has unique insights, and if you bet on it, it leads to major innovation. Google engineers, not the auto industry, came up with the idea of driverless cars after seeing that millions of traffic deaths come from human error.


The others?

2. FOCUS ON THE USER.


5. SHIP AND ITERATE


6. GIVE EMPLOYEES 20 PERCENT TIME


7. DEFAULT TO OPEN PROCESSES


8. FAIL WELL


9. HAVE A MISSION THAT MATTERS



Related posts by Deb:

     

Messing up a Change Implementation with Someone Else’s Learning Culture?

       

3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way


           

A Two Step, Two Video Dance towards Loose – Tight Change & Innovation Leadership

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This inspiring list can stimulate great discussions at all levels for what YOU want in your own culture, mission and vision and management practices.

One caution to note, culture change is not for amateurs.   Take a look at the article references I've listed above for some of the reasons why.

~  Deb 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:00 AM

From our Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?  curation news:  This list can inspire useful discussions at all levels for what YOU want in your own culture, mission and vision and management practices.

One caution, having a meeting on such a topic or deciding to change culture is not for amateurs.   Take a look at the article references I've listed above for some of the reasons why.

~  Deb 

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World for What It Is, or What It Could Be? Elon Musk, Tesla Motors

World for What It Is, or What It Could Be? Elon Musk, Tesla Motors | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

We need people who can execute ...including mastering acceleration.


Elon Musk

Recently featured in a Wall Street Journal article, Musk is compared to Steve Jobs, another visionary, and is then discussed as follows:


Elon Musks's ambitions soar even higher...


His electric-car company Tesla Motors aims to remake the way we drive, while the ultimate goal of his rocket company SpaceX, he said, is to travel to Mars and help build a self-sustaining base there.


______________________

We need people who can execute. Too often people jump ship before they see an idea through...

______________________


Skepticism?  ...each time Mr. Musk delivers a better, less-expensive electric car or launches another rocket successfully, he proves his doubters wrong.


...he co-founded a multibillion-dollar company called PayPal.


...Musk...taught himself to code and program software by the age of 12.


After ...leaving a PhD program at Stanford, Musk dedicated himself to the three important problems that would most affect the future of humanity.  "One was the internet, one was clean energy, and one was space."


All three are revolutionary spaces, and to work in all three most certainly requires an individual willing to completely reinvent himself and his expertise to change course as needed.


We need people who can execute. Too often people jump ship before they see an idea through and don't even begin to master the competency of acceleration before they are onto the next thing.


Related posts from Deb:

     



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Originally posted on my Change Leadership Watch stream, it also is highly instructive to the innovation theme, especially with the lessons of staying-the-course with the new idea and execution.  ~ Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 10, 2013 11:01 AM

The Tesla story has elements of sensing the future that can be instructive for anyone in a change space including innovation.  ~  D

Suggested by Julien Rio
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Innovation and the Unknown Can be Very Difficult to Market

Innovation and the Unknown Can be Very Difficult to Market | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"In a fast moving world, how to make sure your innovation meets the success it deserves?"


...Doctor Levi Spear Parmly invented dental floss in 1815, the innovation was great! He found a perfect way to remove the dirt remaining between the teeth that no brush could reach. His product was responding to a real problem.


Unfortunately, even though the problem was real, people were unaware of it. Therefore, this great innovation that sounds like an obvious solution nowadays hasn't been on the market before 1882, 67 years later. Sometimes innovation solves problems for which people are unaware of a real need.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Good examples & good points about what it takes to make sure your innovation see the light of day in a busy, 6 seconds of video world.  


Henry Ford is said to have created the middle class, therefore the modern consumer of stuff, to his chagrin, by raising the rate of pay of his workers to greatly reduce turnover.  Bringing something new to the world, once known and embracing a newly discovered need, such as to travel from town to town, can change the world, if the marketing helps the innovation be known and accepted.~ Deb

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The 2011 Global Innovation 1000: Why Culture is Key to Performance

The 2011 Global Innovation 1000: Why Culture is Key to Performance | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Certain companies succeed in producing innovative new products and services, and in so doing generate superior financial results.

Our 7th annual Global Innovation 1000 study has consistently demonstrated that the success of these companies is not a matter of how much these companies spend on research and development, but rather how they spend it.

This year, we took under consideration two particular qualities — strategic alignment and a culture that supports innovation — that truly innovative companies have put in place that allow them to outperform the competition.
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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from What I Wish I Had Known
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For J.C. Penney, a Tough Lesson in Listening, to Whom and Shopper Psychology

For J.C. Penney, a Tough Lesson in Listening, to Whom and Shopper Psychology | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Because of the quirks of human psychology, simplifying pricing isn’t so simple. J.C. Penney learned that lesson the hard way.


...consumers are conditioned to wait for deals and sales, partly because they do not have a good sense of how much an item should be worth to them and need cues to figure that out.


Just having a generically fair or low price, as Penney did, said Alexander Chernev, a marketing professor at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, assumes that consumers have some context for how much items should cost. But they don’t.




Via Anita
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Connected to the last post regarding when and how to listen to customers, along with innovation.  ~  Deb

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Anita's curator insight, April 16, 2013 8:21 AM

When the numbers don't tell the whole story.

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Agile Learning
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The Professors, Yes, the MOOC Hype is Worth It: Disruption in Higher Ed

The Professors, Yes, the MOOC Hype is Worth It:  Disruption in Higher Ed | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Professors were asked, do they believe MOOCs "are worth the hype." 79% said yes.


===


In the largest survey of instructors who have taught massive open online courses, The Chronicle heard from critics, converts, and the cautious.

 

Hype around these new free online courses has grown louder and louder since a few professors at Stanford University drew hundreds of thousands of students to online computer-science courses in 2011.


Since then MOOCs, which charge no tuition and are open to anybody with Internet access, have been touted by reformers as a way to transform higher education and expand college access.


Many professors teaching MOOCs had a similarly positive outlook: Asked whether they believe MOOCs "are worth the hype," 79 percent said yes.


Via Smithstorian, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Related posts by Deb:


      
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 18, 2013 12:40 PM

There is some synchroncity here that this article is showing up while I'm listening to a professor at UM talk about Harvard choosing a MOOC for accounting for their entry level accounting (Brigham Young) and outsourcing professors.

Can paths to efficiency and worker health co-exist?

Professor:  Wally Hopp, Associate Dean for Faculty and Research Herrick Professor of Manufacturing, Ross School of Business   Positively Lean: A Path to Efficiency and Energization?


Examples:  Henry Ford, Joe at GM Powertrain, FelPro (300% ROI on Employee Benefits, no turnover > sold to Federal Mogul)


Key themes in the blend:

  • Share the gain
  • Appeal to pride
  • Cultivate a community
  • Pursue a higher purpose <motivation>  (Sugar water or change the world)

 

Apple >> Change the world

Patagonia  >> Corporate responsibility  (Don't buy what you don't need)
University of Michigan  Uncommon education for the common man  (President James Burrill Angell) 


Questions:

  • Is the key challenge aligning organization & employee benefits from efficiency gains?
  • Or is it cultivating a sense of higher purpose?
  • Or something completely different?    
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Innovate like Intuit - Customer-centric, grassroots, connected

Innovate like Intuit - Customer-centric, grassroots, connected | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Innovation doesn't have to be hard to master - a great case study with Intuit, the customer-centric, grassroots innovative TurboTax folks."


It's inspiring to read how Intuit structures in ways to understand its customers, deeply.  We're TurboTax customers, by the way.


Excerpts:


To grow faster than your market, you need to create more value. The essential business challenge is to create better products, less costly solutions, or more effective internal processes that results in better, faster or cheaper service.


Sounds easy, but when you call that “innovation,” many companies freeze up.



One company that excels at listening is personal-finance software giant Intuit Inc. of Mountain View, Calif. The $4-billion-a-year maker of QuickBooks and TurboTax has grown on grassroots innovation.


When Intuit founder Scott Cook was developing the program that became known as Quicken, his sister-in-law phoned hundreds of consumers to find out what they liked and disliked about managing their personal finances.


Cook learned:


  • 80% of consumers resented the time and paperwork required, so he vowed his product would save customers time. 
  • Quicken took off because it was simpler and easier to use than its competitors (which Cook dubbed the “47th-mover advantage”).
Cook also started to follow customers home; he and other staffers would sit at consumers’ kitchen tables and watch them pay their bills. This passion for field research still thrives at Intuit.
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