Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
3.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Where innovation is happening beyond the stuff of small start-ups & tech companies. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation and careers, SUBSCRIBE to REVELN.com/Tools/
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Zappos says Goodbye to Bosses & Bureaucracy - Hello to Holacracy

Zappos says Goodbye to Bosses & Bureaucracy - Hello to Holacracy | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

The famed, unique Las Vegas-based shoe retailer...will eliminate traditional managers, do away with the typical corporate hierarchy and get rid of job titles, at least internally.

__________________
 
....bureaucracy ...was getting in the way of adaptability.”

    

__________________


The unusual approach is called a “holacracy,” replacing the traditional corporate chain of command with a series of overlapping, self-governing “circles.” In theory, this gives employees more of a voice in the way the company is run.


According to Zappos executives, the move is an effort to keep the 1,500-person company from becoming too rigid, too unwieldy and too bureaucratic as it grows.


“As we scaled, we noticed that the bureaucracy we were all used to was getting in the way of adaptability,” says Zappos’s John Bunch, who is helping lead the transition to the new structure.


Holacracy ...has a couple of high-profile devotees — Twitter cofounder Evan Williams uses it at his new company, Medium, and time management guru David Allen uses it run his firm — but Zappos is by far the largest company to adopt the idea.]


Related posts & tools by Deb:


  • Don't miss a thing:  We'll send Best of the Best news, from Deb's 9 curation streams@Deb Nystrom, REVELN (includes: change, agile learning, performance, careers), once a month via email, directly to you, for free.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

      



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'm intrigued to see this second emergence of holacracy.  Do we have an agile organizational structure developing here?

I'm sensing the far edge of a trend here, especially after facilitating Open Space events (self-led interest topics on a theme) in the last couple of years,.  I've mostly used them in a professional learning context, although three client organizations have used this organic, adaptible format for planning & strategy.  


In my view. it seems that these leaders are shifting perspective, letting go of some of the trappings of the 90's, to embrance more adaptive structures that can help fuel innovation.  ~  Deb

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 6, 2014 8:44 PM

Adaptive communication.  It's time for something far beyond Fredrick Taylor's scientific management 1920's style bureacraciy.  I'm sensing this is the calm before the storm of change to move beyond traditional management structures.  There will be more holacracies and their kin to come.  ~  D

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Getting the Balance Right: The innovation ecosystem, Infographic

Getting the Balance Right:  The innovation ecosystem, Infographic | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"The right innovation mix, core, adjacent, and transformational  depends on your business and your needs."


Excerpted:


There are three main components of an organisation’s innovation ecosystem. Getting the balance right between these three components is crucial:

   

1) Balance/Mix of innovation types

  

2) Structure (process, capabilities, culture, funding)

   

3) Metrics & tracking


  • Core innovation is the largest amount of effort (70%) ...typically more incremental improvements

  

  • Adjacent innovation, riskier.  can involve taking existing products to new markets or, more commonly, developing value-add products or services to existing core 
  
  • Transformational innovation, highest risk - new products and services, new markets – big changes to the business


Read the full article here.

more...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Why Innovation Dies - A University Example of Structure Gone Bad - Forbes

Why Innovation Dies - A University Example of Structure Gone Bad - Forbes | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

The classic mistakes made in dealing with disruption are here:  a new administrative lead role (a dean),  policy teams, committees, and implementation plan.


"...the minute the memo started talking about a Policy Team developing detailed implementation plans, it was all over."


Have you been there?  How did it turn out for you?


...Any possibility for innovation dies when a company forms a committee for an “overarching strategy.”


This insightful article by Steve Blank, mirrors what's I've read about and seen time and time again in decisive actions taken by executives and in large institutions.


Excerpted:


Lessons Learned

  • Innovation in New Markets do not come from “overarching strategies”
  • It comes out of opportunity, chaos and rapid experimentation
  • Solutions are found by betting on a portfolio of low-cost experiments
  • The road for innovation does not go through committee

One useful purpose a university committee could have had was figuring out what the goal of going online was.  [The example in the article is education based.]


__________________________


...it is so complex that figuring out the one possible path to a correct solution is computationally incalculable.
__________________________


...the path to implementing online education is not known. In fact, it’s not a solvable problem by committee, regardless of how many smart people in the room. It is a “NP complete” problem – it is so complex that figuring out the one possible path to a correct solution is computationally incalculable.


By:  Steve Blank, author, teacher of entrepreneurship and consultant who has reshaped how startups are created. He is coauthor of the recently published, The Startup Owner’s Manual (K&S Ranch, 2012).

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Agile Learning
Scoop.it!

HR is ripe for social disruption. Innovating HR structure to support peer learning, innovative organizations

HR is ripe for social disruption.  Innovating HR structure to support peer learning, innovative organizations | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Is it finally time for Social HR? What's out there that uses social systems to revitalize how people are recruited and learn, grow and develop within organizations?


If organizations tend to be hidebound against change, Human Resources (HR) is even more so, in spite of the trendy strategic HR spin of the early 2000's . Consider HR's roots, which persist today: labor relations, compensation, employment/personnel and the number of lawyers on staff.


Here's some fresh thinking about embracing social as a new definer of HR systems from Gautam Ghosh.


Excerpted, adapted:


Recruitment:  HR has been quick to leverage social media to “Broadcast” vacancies. The next level would be actively creating and nurturing communities of practice shaped around skills where hiring managers can gauge level of skills of people and also develop them (Disclaimer: The author works with BraveNewTalent, a platform that helps organizations do that)


Knowledge Sharing: Forget the idea of databases acting as “repositories” of knowledge, internal social networks can capture employees work activity as social intranets  – and team members can follow what others are doing on their activity streams. Newer tools like Opzi and MindQuilt can also emerge as a enterprise version of Quora, the popular Q&A site.


HR policies: Using a social tool which leverages crowdsourcing ideas from employees can help HR in co-creating processes and policies – and raise acceptability when they are finally rolled out. Dell’s EmployeeStorm is a great example by which employees give ideas on everything in the company.


From the autho, Gautam Ghosh, a Product Evangelist and India Marketing Lead at BraveNewTalent specializing in the areas of HR, organization development and learning and employee engagement. He has worked as a HR Generalist and a Learning and Development Executive in firms like Deloitte, Dell, Hewlett Packard and Satyam Computer Services."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Can you Disrupt Your Own Culture Structure? | Four Key Innovation Contradictions

Can you Disrupt Your Own Culture Structure? | Four Key Innovation Contradictions | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Innovation is fraught with contradictions.  Is there room for innovation's natural contradictions in your organization culture?  


A handy indicator is looking at your organization's people policies (HR) as a quick capacity test. 


Four Key Innovation Contradictions excerpted, Innovation Excellence:


1) Innovation requires a business to embrace processes and methods that are far different from the efficient, effective processes that sustain short term profitability. Innovation creates new, risky, uncertain concepts that will pay off in quarters if not years.


2) While executives want innovation, they don’t want the disruption or investment strain required which creates dissonance in the teams that are actively trying to do interesting innovation work, and leads to confusion and then cynicism.


3) Transparency, visibility and commitment are key. Doing innovation work is tough, and doing it without the full support of the senior team, constantly demonstrated, means that many innovators have far fewer resources than they need.


4) The contradiction between what we TELL people to do and what we PAY people to do when we do nothing [or too little] to change how these individuals are evaluated, compensated and rewarded. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

The Tipping Point between Structure & Innovation

The Tipping Point between Structure & Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Somewhere between the two extremes exists a tipping point – a place where full creativity and the lack of structure reaches a balance with purposeful, valuable and necessary structures and processes."


____________________

Balancing structure and freedom, processes and creativity is an art, not a science.  ____________________

Move much more toward additional structure and you begin to limit and stifle creativity and innovation outcomes. 


Move much more toward freedom and creativity and you lose the ability to manage, develop and commercialize ideas. Where does the tipping point reside?


Your innovation activities need enough structure to identify and commercialize great ideas effectively, but not so much structure that people are stymied or slowed by processes, forms and decisions. 


In organizations where purposeful innovation is fairly new, the tipping point is closer to the regimented side, since there are few widely distributed capabilities or tools. As an organization gains experience innovating, the structure and rigidity become less important, as innate skills and culture learn to shape and manage ideas more effectively.


Related posts by Deb:



   
Photo:  by lambdachialpha Flickr CC
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's the art of deciding how to get the balance right: SO MANY businesses along with newbie or ill-informed managers stifle creativity, resulting in rampant mediocrity, morale problems and talent loss. Turn it around from victim, persecutor roles to encourager, challenger, collaborator, coach of your innovators.  ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems

Faster and more creative when solving OTHER people's problems | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Recent research reveals that people are more capable of mental novelty when thinking on behalf of others than for themselves.

 

Great piece on enriching the field of view and other perspectives, something we also encourage in executive coaching.  


________________________


...abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. ...But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite.

________________________


Excerpts:

 

Over the years, social scientists have found that abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. That means that if we care about innovation we need to be more abstract and therefore more distant. But in our businesses and our lives, we often do the opposite. We intensify our focus rather than widen our view. We draw closer rather than step back.

 

That's a mistake, Polman and Emich suggest. "That decisions for others are more creative than decisions for the self... should prove of considerable interest to negotiators, managers, product designers, marketers and advertisers, among many others," they write.

 

Dan Pink's suggestions, excerpted:

  

• Recruit more independent directors.   Begin with corporate governance. 

~ having independent directors on the boards of public companies. 

 

• Rethink the structure of your firm.

Perhaps loose alliances of distantly connected people

 

• Harness the power of peers.

....assemble a small group of peers – all from different industries – and gather periodically to exchange ideas and offer solutions from new perspectives.

 

• Find a problem-swapping partner.

Find a friend or colleague with whom you can occasionally swap problems...

 

• Disasssociate yourself.

Imagine you're doing it for someone else...


Full article here

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Creating your Own Luck to Build a Successful Innovation Culture, the Innovator's Mindset

Creating your Own Luck to Build a Successful Innovation Culture, the Innovator's Mindset | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Is it a mindset of creating your own luck that sets innovative organizations apart?"


Do the featured characteristics of innovative cultures in organizations follow the make-your-own-luck characteristics listed in this article?   See if you agree that it's about having a certain mindset translated to culture:


Excerpted:


...Having a positive, innovator’s mindset actually CREATES success, and luck.


In The Luck Factor (Miramax, 2003) professor Richard Wiseman, from the University of Hertfordshire, details his research providing the following insight – Luck (or success) comes to those who embrace and embody four essential principles:


Creating luck by noticing and acting on opportunities,
Expecting that one can create luck through perseverance,
‣ Making decisions which are informed by the well honed intuition, and
‣ Resisting the negative by finding and even creating the bright side of every situation


The post author, Bradley Bendle, also cites several other recent innovation books including a model from Andy Stefanovich in Look at More (Jossey-Bass, 2011) and his five M’s framework (Mood, Mindset, Mechanisms, Measurement, Momentum.)


Like other posts on his site, the post is rich in citations plus the author's own spin and distillation based on his innovation readings including his view of the Innovator’s Mindset as being comprised of following six reinforcing domains:


1) Alertness
2) Curiousness
3) Willingness
4) Joy
5) Desire
6) Drive



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Will they Pay? Degrees & UnBundling: Massive online courses not a game changing innovation > Competency building is

Will they Pay?  Degrees & UnBundling: Massive online courses not a game changing innovation > Competency building is | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Higher ed disrupters:  It may not be what it seems, Alice.   It's the unbundling and competency building that makes the difference.


As shared on this curation stream, with higher education seeming like one of the next bubbles to burst, due to high cost, ossified bureacracies and the like, there is more to the story.


The context, if you've missed it, is further below.   Meanwhile, here's a few other things to consider having to do with profitability, the value of a degree & unbundling - several key concepts for these changing times for higher education:


Excerpted:


If you build it, will they pay?

...when the chattering class meets Professor Thrun, it’s love at first sight. The notion that they might take a Stanford course for free recalls their youthful days at similar elite universities


...educational romantics already have degrees. And when Udacity begins charging even modest fees for its courses, Professor Thrun may find this group resistant to paying for lifelong learning.


"Degrees are definitely not disappearing; they’re not even in decline."

...in developing economies, where there is truly a hunger for knowledge in any form and where the degree may not yet be as central to the evaluation of prospective employees [like it is in the US], the wage premium from a bachelor’s degree is even higher [than the US]:

  • 124 percent in Mexico,
  • 171 percent in Brazil and
  • 200 percent in China,
  • compared with a mere 62 percent in the U.S.
.

Unbundling & Building Success in Competencies are the Innovation

Salman Khan's popular on-line Khan Academy videos teach a single concept.

  • Stanford Professor Thrun’s (reference below) online course builds on Khan’s innovation, and the resulting andragogy is remarkable.


Professor Thrun had to say in his announcement, excerpted:


We really set up our students for failure. We don’t help students to become smart.


Grades are the failure of the education system.  ...So rather than grading students, my task was to make students successful.


We changed the course so the questions were still hard, but students could attempt them multiple times. And when they finally got them right, they would get their A+. And it was much better.


Today, when someone fails, we don’t take time to make them a strong student. We give them a C or a D, move them to the next class. Then they’re branded a loser, and they’re set up for failure. This medium has the potential to change all that.


Context, excerpted:

The news media has been abuzz over two higher education developments:


1) MIT announces an extension of its successful OpenCourseWare initiative and that it will offer certificates to students who complete courses. MITx will allow students to access content for free. Students who wish to receive a certificate will be charged a modest fee for the requisite assessments,  issued under the name MIT.


2) Sebastian Thrun, an adjunct professor of computer science at Stanford who invited the world to attend his fall semester artificial intelligence course and who ended up with 160,000 online students, announced he had decided to stop teaching at Stanford and direct all his teaching activities through Udacity, a start-up he co-founded that will offer online courses from leading professors to millions of students.


He called the experience of reaching so many students life-changing: “Having done this, I can’t teach at Stanford again. I feel there’s a red pill and a blue pill. And you can take the blue pill and go back to your classroom and lecture your 20 students. But I’ve taken the red pill, and I’ve seen Wonderland.”


Read more via InsideHigherEd.com


Photo credit: DaBok, Flickr cc

more...
No comment yet.