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Disruptive Technology and Innovation Requires Change Management & New Talent Strategy

Disruptive Technology and Innovation Requires Change Management & New Talent Strategy | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
HR professionals know that anything that causes business disruptions is certain to have implications for human resource management, including the growth of 3-D printing.


I admit I'm looking forward to it. I think the 3-D printer is such a disruptive technology that I want to be in on the fun.


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...The teenager found the plans on the Internet. Imagine, open-sourced body parts!

    

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The news reports range from 3-D printing an iPhone case to high-heel shoes, or models of body parts on which doctors can practice.


...my favorite use of the technology so far goes to a teenager who used a 3-D printer at a local library to build a prosthetic hand for a boy who was born without fingers. The hand opens and closes and can even hold a pencil. The teenager found the plans on the Internet. Imagine, open-sourced body parts!


Implications for HR leaders? 
  

McKinsey recently issued a report highlighting some of the business disruptions that are likely to result from this new technology.



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... there may be very specific, and difficult to find, talent requirements for such a shift, and begin to devise a talent-development and sourcing strategy to meet the [need]

   

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3-D technology  -- aka additive manufacturing -- is likely to accelerate product development.  ... Value may not come from manufacturing a product; it may come from being able to add uniqueness to the design alone.

   

  • Don't wait until someone tells you it might have an impact: Know the business well enough to raise the issue if no one has mentioned it already. 
     
  • Help the executive team consider the strategic implications of the technology and whether it can be leveraged to the business' advantage or whether the business needs to be prepared to meet new forms of competition.
    
  • Recognize that there may be very specific, and difficult to find, talent requirements for such a shift, and begin to devise a talent-development and sourcing strategy to meet the skilled-worker needs of a new manufacturing strategy.

 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a quality article emphasizing the need to be ready for adaptive change, perhaps fast.  As author Susan R. Meisinger suggests, be "not only be prepared to manage the change, ...be leaders within the organization in embracing and driving change."  I'd add, create a learning environment now with leadership at all levels to empower your ability to change together.  Share what's important to be ready.  ~  D

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Leading in a VUCA world

Leading in a VUCA world | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"How’s your leadership working on in your VUCA world (Volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous)? "


Liz Guthridge has written a great post on leading in a VUCA world; VCUA stands for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous, a term coined by the US Army War College in the weeks before September 11, 2001.  


Liz & I discussed the need for collaboration and community across disciplines to succeed in a VUCA world in connection with our recent panel + Open Space presentation we did for a global change conference.


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VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

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Here are some excerpts of her take on the insightful presentation by one of our keynote presenters:


"Leading in a VUCA world" is a popular phrase with Bob Johansen, a distinguished fellow and former president of Institute for the Future.


According to Dr. Johansen, who shared his 2020 forecast at the Association of Change Management Professionals global conference this week, our VUCA world is not going away. In fact it’s just going to spin faster during the next decade.


In his talk “External Future Forces That Will Disrupt the Practice of Change Management,” Dr. Johansen noted that VUCA is not necessarily doom and gloom. While VUCA can provide threats, it also can offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.”


As for his two big 2022 predictions for organizational change agents, they are:


1. “The digital natives (now 16 years or younger) will create new practices to make change through gaming.” (The other key phrase besides gaming in this sentence is “make.” Dr. Johansen predicts that a culture of makers will drive the next generation of change. And as a result, leaders need to show the “maker instinct” trait.)


2. “Reciprocity-based innovation will focus on the economic, social and psychological value of reciprocity.” (Two important traits for leaders are smart-mob organizing and commons creating. Think Creative Commons.)


Dr. Johansen challenged the 825 of us in attendance to figure out how to help people and organizations adapt to these changes and others.


To do this, we should watch our terms and our questions.  Read Liz's full post here.

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Tom Hood's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:16 PM

We just covered this in our townhall this past Monday. Arelene Thomas (AICPA/CGMA) talked about VUCA related to CPAs in Biz/Industry.


VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:26 PM

We need to consider VUCA

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Curation Strategy at IBM: Collaboration, Empowered Intranet Communication [Video]

Curation Strategy at IBM: Collaboration, Empowered Intranet Communication [Video] | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

It's been said that IBM's geniuses collective will challenge Apple's 1 genius model.


This post features an interview with IBM's VP for digital strategy & devel. highlighting their change/leading trend practice on internal curation.

 

I'm sharing Robin Good's ScoopIt  (curation commentator, blogger) geared for trend spotters, intranet managers and content strategists.

 

Mark Ragan interviews Ben Edwards, Vice-President for Digital Strategy and Development at IBM on  the changing landscape for corporate intranets.

 

What caught my attention:

 

- Effective internal collaboration within the company can bring to the development of new commercial products and services.

 

- Institutional and internally-produced professional content is declining and it is giving way to lots of new employee-generated content. 

 

- The company must be outward looking and play a role in suggesting what employee must be attention to.

 

- Curation is an effective approach to manage and extract greater value from such growing amount of content.

- Curation is about providing a trusted source that can  pick, select, suggest and "frame" what needs to be attention to. What is of value. 

 

- Curation is about being a subject matter expert on a specific "vertical" area of interest - and this is something a company may want to look into both for "external" and "internal" communications

 

- Companies like IBM are now enabling the "experts" within the company to communicate more and better. 

 

- The trend is toward cultivating more internal collaboration, and to enable our people to be great communicators who can create extra value out there

 

Insightful. 8/10

 

See the 9 min video interview here: http://www.hrcommunication.com/Main/Articles/7388.aspx 


Via Robin Good
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Leading Change: Three Major Misconceptions That Hinder Innovation

Leading Change: Three Major Misconceptions That Hinder Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Innovation has become vital for value creation. More than ever will it distinguish successful institutions from the less successful..."


Three fundamental misconceptions stick out.


1. Innovation is synonym for change:

Too often innovation and change initiatives are mixed up. Many change initiatives are actually improvement oriented and based on knowledge and examples that are already available in the marketplace (best practices, benchmarks, pilots), and are therefore not innovative.


Real innovation requires a company to go first, to go where no one has been before; to be a leader rather than a follower.


2. Innovation is a business goal as any other:

Research shows that successful innovation depends on the level of strategic alignment in the organization: alignment between the corporate strategy, the innovation strategy and the corporate culture (see a recent study in S+B on this). Innovation is therefore more fundamental.


It requires a specific innovation strategy and culture, based on:

  • a profound understanding of the external developments, 
  • how we adjust our strategy to it, 
  • in what part of the business (products, services, processes, systems) we need to innovate, 
  • how we use our qualities and competencies to create innovation, 
  • what competencies we are missing and need to develop, 
  • how we deal with trial & error and failure, 
  • how we will change the way we work in teams, 
  • how we will refocus resources.
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3. An innovation culture is something you can copy from successful innovative companies:   Wrong, doing what others do is not innovating! You can learn lessons from others, but you will have to translate those to your own reality.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, December 19, 2011 11:54 AM
Also from Deb: This is one of the better blog posts I've seen out there, especially highlighting specific differences between innovation strategy and change management. The list alone mirrors recent innovation consulting strategy in consulting organizations.
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Steve Blank's Lean Startup Model: Not Just For Startups, Rather For Surviving & Thriving in ANY Business

Steve Blank's Lean Startup Model: Not Just For Startups, Rather For Surviving & Thriving in ANY Business | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

The principles of the lean startup pose big challenge to corporate behemoths – but Steve Blank argues that they are now “essential for the survival of business.”

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Via joostallard
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a challenge to how business is done.  This is not your dad's company strategy, or even the Fortune 50's strategy from last year.    It is predicted the Fortune 500 will swap itself out with new business within a decade.  It IS time to rethink which business principles you will follow. ~ D

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RELENTLESS! Reinventing Higher Education, Southern New Hampshire University @SNHU via Fast Company

RELENTLESS!  Reinventing Higher Education,  Southern New Hampshire University @SNHU via Fast Company | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"As president of Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU), LeBlanc is ...using technology to transform an 80-year-old college into a modern education powerhouse."


I tweeted about @SNHU over a year ago, as I was intrigued they had an MBA in Social Media.  However, it led to a conversation with several people at the institution.  


After experiencing a considerable amount of the hidebound nature of the ivory tower of higher education, the experience I had with SNHU was a breath of fresh air, informed by data and, could it be, skilled process?


New England is the land of the ivies.   So much the better for @SNHU (their twitter handle) to leverage what they do as they think & implement differently.


Stay tuned, an interview may soon follow...


Excerpts:

Founded in 1932 as the New Hampshire School of Accounting and Secretarial Science, SNHU was a modest school when Le­Blanc joined as president in 2003, recognized for its culinary arts, business, and justice programs. Its online program was, as LeBlanc puts it, "a sleepy operation on a nondescript corner of the main campus. I thought it was squandering an opportunity."


That little operation has turned into SNHU’s Center for Online and Continuing Education (COCE), the largest online-degree provider in New England.


Its 10,600 students are enrolled in 120 graduate and undergraduate programs and specialties, everything from a sustainability-focused MBA to a creative-writing BA.


Fifty more programs will be launched this year, and the COCE recently tested TV ads in national markets such as Raleigh, North Carolina; Milwaukee; and Oklahoma City.


LeBlanc hopes that by 2014 SNHU will boast the country’s biggest online not-for-profit education system.

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Times Higher Education - Innovation strategy 'ignores' funding and visa concerns

University strategies & policy:  Too little innovation?


Excerpt:  Wendy Piatt, director-general of the Russell Group of large research-intensive universities, welcomed many of the measures in the newly announced innovation strategy, but was disappointed it did not address concerns about postgraduate funding, or adopt the Russell Group's proposal for a new bank loan scheme for postgraduates.


She also called for more capital funding to be made available to universities, and for research to be exempted from the Freedom of Information Act.


David Price, vice-provost for research at University College London, praised the government for "the stability of its commitment to the research base" in difficult times.


He also said it was a pity the strategy's "fine words on the importance of mobile highly skilled people" had not translated into concessions regarding universities' continuing concerns about the government's new visa regulations.

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