Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from 21st Century Teaching and Learning
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27 Ways to Inspire Students to Innovate

27 Ways to Inspire Students to Innovate | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Educator Mia MacMeekin made this infographic about ways to inspire students to think more deeply about how innovation applies to them.


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Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

After taking a look at this catchy infographic, what does innovation mean to you?  ~  D

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, November 29, 2013 7:36 PM

Creative activities that can allow the students to develop innovative thinking.

Richard Platt's curator insight, December 8, 2013 11:40 PM

(from the Curator of IoT & Wearables): We've stayed away from many academic's re: how to enable students to be better at problem solving and innovating, (because most academics think they already know what innovation and complex problem solving is all about and well not to put too fine a point on it they just don't),  

 

We do take issue wtih the status quo of academia.  Obviously we have strongly held views on engineering education and problem solving / innovaiton, but they are warranted and justified.

 

We see most academic work in the area of innovating, problem solving / problem finding and more specifically in complex problem solving in the domain of engineering  to be broken., biased and prejudicial  

 

Nonetheless we do give credit in this post by Mia MacMeekin as it is a move in the right direction, we just don't see it going far enough to make problem solving and problem finding cool or effective enough for students to really be able to do anything significant with when it comes time for them to contribute.  Sorry we call it as we see it..  

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The Nature of the Future – Review | Harold Jarche

The Nature of the Future – Review | Harold Jarche | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Marina Gorbis identifies unique human skills [that] should be the core of any public education program.


  • Sensemaking
  • Social and emotional intelligence
  • Novel and adaptive thinking
  • Moral and ethical reasoning


As Gorbis write... “Learning is Social”.


We need to learn how to work better with machines, letting machines do what they are good at.


Gorbis shows how machines and average people can outperform experts at playing chess. 


“Weak human + machine + better process

was superior to a strong computer alone

and, more remarkably,superior to a

strong human + machine + inferior process.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's not just the skills, it's the social and the process, lest all the talk about MOOCs and universities and skill training lead to engineering and accounting.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 26, 2013 2:39 PM

Sensemaking of MOOCs and adaptive learning.  Trust a smart process.  ~ Deb

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The 12 Masters of Innovation - Perspectives, Slideshare, Harvard Business Review

The 12 Masters of Innovation - Perspectives, Slideshare, Harvard Business Review | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Worth a good look on leadership in innovation.


Some of who are listed include these educators:


Steve Blank, a seasoned entrepreneur who lectures at Berkeley and Stanford

His most important innovation lesson:

  • A startup is a "temporary organization searching for a repeatable and scalable business model"—a structured search process maximizes your chances of success.
  • If you read one book, read: The Four Steps to the Epiphany (Cafepress.com, 2005)


Clayton Christensen, Harvard Business School professor and Innosight co-founder.
His most important innovation lesson:

  • Doing everything right can leave a successful organization susceptible to attack from a disruptive innovator who changes the game with a simple, accessible, or affordable solution.
  • If you read one book, read: The Innovator's Solution (with Michael Raynor; Harvard Business Review Press, 2003)


Peter Drucker, legendary management guru and long-time professor at the Claremont Graduate University
  • His most important innovation lesson: "The customer rarely buys what the company thinks it is selling him." Companies need to take a customer-first perspective to succeed with innovation.
  • If you read one book, read: Innovation and Entrepreneurship (originally published in 1985)



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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Agile Learning
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HR is ripe for social disruption. Innovating HR structure to support peer learning, innovative organizations

HR is ripe for social disruption.  Innovating HR structure to support peer learning, innovative organizations | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Is it finally time for Social HR? What's out there that uses social systems to revitalize how people are recruited and learn, grow and develop within organizations?


If organizations tend to be hidebound against change, Human Resources (HR) is even more so, in spite of the trendy strategic HR spin of the early 2000's . Consider HR's roots, which persist today: labor relations, compensation, employment/personnel and the number of lawyers on staff.


Here's some fresh thinking about embracing social as a new definer of HR systems from Gautam Ghosh.


Excerpted, adapted:


Recruitment:  HR has been quick to leverage social media to “Broadcast” vacancies. The next level would be actively creating and nurturing communities of practice shaped around skills where hiring managers can gauge level of skills of people and also develop them (Disclaimer: The author works with BraveNewTalent, a platform that helps organizations do that)


Knowledge Sharing: Forget the idea of databases acting as “repositories” of knowledge, internal social networks can capture employees work activity as social intranets  – and team members can follow what others are doing on their activity streams. Newer tools like Opzi and MindQuilt can also emerge as a enterprise version of Quora, the popular Q&A site.


HR policies: Using a social tool which leverages crowdsourcing ideas from employees can help HR in co-creating processes and policies – and raise acceptability when they are finally rolled out. Dell’s EmployeeStorm is a great example by which employees give ideas on everything in the company.


From the autho, Gautam Ghosh, a Product Evangelist and India Marketing Lead at BraveNewTalent specializing in the areas of HR, organization development and learning and employee engagement. He has worked as a HR Generalist and a Learning and Development Executive in firms like Deloitte, Dell, Hewlett Packard and Satyam Computer Services."

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from :: The 4th Era ::
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61 Online and Social Media Resources for Motivating People to Create

61 Online and Social Media Resources for Motivating People to Create | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Mike Brown looks at the Adobe “State of Create Study” [which] polled 5,000 people across the US, UK, Germany, France, and Japan regarding their perspectives on creativity across multiple dimensions of society.

   

The last slide >> “Social media plays a minor role, if any, in motivating people to create.” Across the global study, only 11% of respondents said social media plays a “great deal” of a role in their creative motivation.

    

"Huh?

   

"If that’s the case, people around the globe are really missing out on the incredible new opportunities for creative motivation presented by online and social media resources. 


Via Jim Lerman
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Creativity, and then, innovation  ~  D

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Success Case Study: Pitching a Learning Tool Directly to Professors

Success Case Study:  Pitching a Learning Tool Directly to Professors | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Instead of convincing universities to take a chance on its classroom engagement platform, Top Hat Monocle made direct contact with professors who asked students to also pick up the tab.


...most students carried mobile devices...which could be used for in-class interaction. [The founders] ...developed a prototype product that focused on quizzing and polling students, and pilot-tested the prototype in two classes.


_____________________

Large organizations have a very long sales cycle ... catch them outside of [their] budget cycle, you may not get another chance for a year or two.

_____________________



“Selling to large organizations like universities, governments and big corporations is difficult and time-consuming. Large organizations have a very long sales cycle and if you catch them outside of a budget cycle, you may not get another chance for a year or two.”



THE SOLUTION

The founders decided to “consumerize the classroom” by focusing on individual professors, rather than universities. This made sense because the value proposition was focused on the classroom and because professors have much latitude in making adoption decisions.

THE RESULT


This academic year, it is being used by 2,000 professors and more than 150,000 students at 300 universities worldwide. More than 80 per cent of these universities are in the United States.


The company has 75 employees, offices in three countries, and has been able to raise another $9.1-million in financing.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

If you've seen drug companies advertising in the media directly to you, vs. your doctor or health system, you've seen another angle on this.  How do innovative ideas take hold in your institution today?  ~  Deb

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Change Leadership Watch
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5 Factors and Adoption Rate Tools to Predict Change Success with your Innovation – VinJones

5 Factors and Adoption Rate Tools to Predict Change Success with your Innovation – VinJones | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
The excerpted post below is part of a two part series that offers change and innovation adoption rate tools.


What I like about Kevin's 2-part series is that it is not about the unconvincing ROI, return on investment metric. It is about the powerful effect of stories, examples and case studies that inspire and "spark ...imagination.


His first post focuses on the five (5) factors to use to predict the rate of adoption. The second post offers tools and templates to give you an adoption rate measurement.

___________________________


Contrary to popular belief, an ROI will not convince them. ...it is stories and examples and case studies which spark their imagination. ~ Kevin Jones, vinJones.com

___________________________


Also keep in mind that change and innovation are quite different from each other. This is particularly highlighted in our two curation streams: Innovation in Institutions, Will it Blend? and the one you are reading, Change Leadership Watch.


We are also highlighting Kevin's tools on CMRsite.com, a non-partisan change management resources site.


Excerpts:


The Adoption Index
One of my favorite books is Diffusion of Innovations by Everett M. Rogers. Although this largely academic book was originally written in 1962, it hasn’t lost any of its usefulness. It explains why innovations and technologies are adopted, or not, and at what rate.


1)“Relative advantage is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as better than the idea it supersedes."


The degree of relative advantage may be measured in economic terms, but social prestige factors, convenience, and satisfaction are also important factors.”


2)“Compatibility is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as being consistent with the existing values, past experiences, and needs of potential adopters.


3)“Complexity is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as difficult to understand and use.”


Read the full post for all five factors and the link to part 2 of the series that offers adoption rate tools.



via vinjones.com

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