Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Harvard Woman Demos 3D Printed Makeup, Industry Disruption In Mind

Harvard Woman Demos 3D Printed Makeup, Industry Disruption In Mind | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
"We’re going to live in a world where you can take a picture of your friend’s lipstick and print it out," says the founder.


Grace Choi was at Harvard Business School when she decided to disrupt the beauty industry. She researched and realized that "The makeup industry makes a whole lot of money on a whole lot of bulls**t,"  Choi said at TechCrunch Disrupt this week.


"They charge a huge premium on something that tech provides for free. That one thing is color."


Color printers are available to everyone, and the ink they have is the same as the ink makeup companies use in their products. She also says the ink is FDA approved.

She demonstrated how it works, then brushed some of the freshly-printed makeup onto her hand. 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Choi shows just how susceptible the beauty industry is to disruption with her 3D printer and company, Mink.   As email and the internet disrupted the US Postal Service and the media industry, 3D printing attracts entrepreneurs who are ready to disrupt long standing, premium priced industries like beauty products.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 2014 4:10 PM

Choi shows just how susceptible the beauty industry is to disruption with her 3D printer and company, Mink.   As email and the internet disrupted the US Postal Service and the media industry, 3D printing attracts entrepreneurs who are ready to disrupt long standing, premium priced industries like beauty products.  ~  Deb

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The Facebook Business Model, Really? University Courses, Build Now, Money Later

The Facebook Business Model, Really?  University Courses, Build Now, Money Later | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Something ununusual is happening in usually glacially-paced universities; they are investing in a start-up strategy: "Build fast and worry about money later."

  

There is some controvery that access to free courses does not a degree make, and that, after all, this could be a grand marketing scheme with questionable motives. Degrees are still in demand as much as they ever were.

  

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"[It's] a new educational plutocracy where the "rich" are enabled and embraced, and the middling and lower classes are given scraps ...so that they can participate, but perhaps not really benefit.  ~  Stacey Simmons

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"By denying qualified people (meaning those who have completed the work) access to degrees or some other endorsement, institutions are establishing a new educational plutocracy where the "rich" are enabled and embraced, and the middling and lower classes are given scraps by which they might educate themselves so that they can participate, but perhaps not really benefit, and certainly never enter the world of the elite. ~ Stacey Simmons, one of Fast Companies "Most Creative People"

  

If you've seen the movie: The Social Network, you'll know that that using Facebook as a business model is not unknown to higher education. However something ununusual is happening in usually glacially-paced universities; they are investing in a start-up strategy: "Build fast and worry about money later."

   

Excerpted:    

   

Coursera is following an approach popular among Silicon Valley start-ups: Build fast and worry about money later. Venture capitalists—and even two universities—have invested more than $22-million in the effort already.

   

_____________________


But, does it change their lives for the better?
_____________________


"Our VC's keep telling us that if you build a Web site that is changing the lives of millions of people, then the money will follow," says Daphne Koller, the company's other co-founder, who is also a professor at Stanford.

    

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Deb: But, does it change their lives for the better?  Stanford, of course, had one of the first professors to jump ship to offer a large, free course to the world.  


  • Sebastian Thrun, an adjunct professor of computer science at Stanford who invited the world to attend his fall semester artificial intelligence course and who ended up with 160,000 online students, announced he had decided to stop teaching at Stanford and direct all his teaching activities through Udacity, a start-up he co-founded that will offer online courses from leading professors to millions of students.


Stacey Simmons, CEO & Founder at Omnicademy, questions the motivations of offering free courses if degrees from prestigious institutions are not accessible to the many.  On the other hand, it could be an amazing new education model, per her TED conversation here.

     
    
My own alma mater, University of Michigan, has been among the first to invest.

Source: The Chronicle of Higher Education, How an Upstart Company Might Profit from Free Courses


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Finishing – The 7th unique trait of a corporate intrapreneur - Innovation Excellence, Institutions

Finishing – The 7th unique trait of a corporate intrapreneur - Innovation Excellence, Institutions | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Can corporate cultures truely support entrepreneurial thinking, which is intraprenuership?  


This series of posts features Steve Todd's view of the 7 elements of intrapreneuring.  


Excerpt from #7, which gives a good overview of the full series:


A brief review: the first three habits (productivity, initiative, and collaboration) accelerate idea generation in a corporation.


The next three habits (3-Box time Management, Plus-2 Visibility, and Bridge Building) allow an intrapreneur to move forward and ultimately receive corporate approval for completing their idea.


The trait of finishing closes a circle that connects with the first trait of productivity. Intrapreneurs finish because they are productive; it is, after all, their foundational trait.

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MOOCs, Blended Learning on Stage with Charlie Rose - Online Education

MOOCs, Blended Learning on Stage with Charlie Rose - Online Education | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"I will say the blended model, ...with certainty, is revolutionizing, higher education." "...access to a Master Teacher..."  ~ Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania


Charlie interviews:

  • Anant Agarwal, CEO of edX;
  • Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania;
  • Joel Klein, former New York City Schools chancellor and CEO of Amplify and
  • Tom Friedman of the New York 


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

A blend of views discuss MOOCs and on-line education.  Note the access and pacing comments of Anant Agarwal from edX and what he's implying.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 26, 2013 2:22 PM

Pacing the learning, removing the exclusive, high expense of the classic 4 year degree, access to "Master Teachers," are some the the advantages.

An alternative view of higher education was forecast by a guest blogger on my own website who built his own degree at a much lower cost, listed above, "Right Sizing..."   ~ Deb

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Moving Beyond Surreptitious Manager Improv, Risk & Reward, Emerging Best Practice in your Org, Steve Leybourne

Moving Beyond Surreptitious Manager Improv, Risk & Reward, Emerging Best Practice in your Org, Steve Leybourne | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Managers improvise all the time, surreptitiously, outside of processes & strategies, in order to deal with compression of time & resources."  


How to make it work, Boston Univ.,  Asst. Professor views, referencing the financial industry.


My notes from the video:


Steve Leybourne covers the softer, challenging elements of work, confirming that more than ever, work is not predictable. It is doing too much, with too little, and so, managers improvise all the time, surreptitiously.  


Managers then work outside of processes, strategies, goals and plans, so there is risk.   Managers will this on your own, and expose themselves to failure.  If things go right, they will have an emerging best practice. But if they fail, then they are really exposed.    See the full Improvisation in Organizations video here.



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Successful improvisation produces better ways of achieving tasks = emerging best practice.  -  Steve Leybourne, Asst. Professor, Boston University


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The model pictured from the video features:


Three constructs: Creativity, Intuition & Bricolage (making the best of whatever resources you have at hand) from Moorman & Miner (1998.) They define improvisation as:
"the degree to which composition and execution converge in time."



Add in three more from their later research, Adaptation, Compression, Innovation (deviation from existing practices & knowledge) leading to Learning. Miner et. al. Minnesota (2001)


Leybourne lists these added three as outputs, which, in the model depicted lead to learning that is fed back into the process.   Adaptive routines are actually outputs to the next round of improvisations.


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It is doing too much, with too little, and so, managers improvise all the time, surreptitiously.

________________________



He also covers what can go wrong in improvisation, how to build trust within a team to improvise, and dealing with ambiguity, poor specifications.


See the full Improvisation in Organizations video here.


Thanks to Sources:  Rutger Slump and Steve Leybourne,  guest speaker at de Baak about Improvisation in Organizations. He is a assistant professor at Boston University in Innovation and Entrepreneurship. letsplayinnovation.wordpress.com



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Finding Innovation Help Next Door, Even in your Past, Forgotten Experience | Innovation Excellence |

Finding Innovation Help Next Door, Even in your Past, Forgotten Experience | Innovation Excellence | | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Great examples of ways to cultivate innovation - other companies in other industries, other verticals:  “Who else has solved a similar problem?”


A medical device company that made angioplasty equipment wanted to create a computer simulation that would predict how the “balloon” would expand.


Where did they turn for an accurate computer model?


In the past, they worked with car manufacturers and built statistical models that simulated the expansion and contraction of airbags. This proved to be a wildly accurate way of predicting how a balloon catheter would operate.


When you are working on your next business challenge, ask yourself:

“Who else has solved a similar problem?”


In doing so, you might significantly accelerate your innovation effort.


Blog author Stephen Shapiro is the author of five books including “Best Practices Are Stupid” and “Personality Poker” (both published by Penguin). 

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