Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Bill Gates Futuring and HR/Recruiting Stuck in a Time Warp

Bill Gates Futuring and HR/Recruiting Stuck in a Time Warp | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Bill Gates has been in the media of late with “My Plan to Fix the World’s Biggest Problems.”


Gates’ solution is about continuous improvement.  However ...as Gates’ says, this is simple in concept, but often difficult to execute.  

  


Excerpts:
  
While times have changed for most business functions, it seems that the HR and recruiting departments are stuck in a time warp, circa 1975.

  

1) Stop using skills and experience-based job descriptions.... Instead require the hiring manager to define the job in terms of 6-8 measurable performance objectives.


2) Measure the hiring manager’s ability to attract, develop and retain top people.


3) Never interview more than four people for any job.


4) Define Quality of Hire before the person’s hired based on a performance-based job description.


Related article from Deb:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The author of this article uses HR and recruiting as an example of old practices that need updating as good hires (and good talent development and succession planning) are the front door to smart, high performance cultures.

Balanced scorecards began to be used for the very reason of taking HR's people hire impact into a balanced account of measurement, beyond finance to internal business, learning and growth.


Using performance based job descriptions and innovation (refurbishing boring jobs) can be transforming to organizations still working from a 70's model of HR.

Be aware, overdoing metrics also has drawbacks, such auto companies over-relying on measurement, via ill-conceived management purges (that also appeared age-driven.)  Staffers served in roles as mentors that also produced lower numbers in their metrics because they were taking time to help newly hired and learning youngers.  The lack of a systemic focus lowered productivity and morale at the same time.  

~ Deb

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Spaces for Innovation
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The world's most creative cities > Does it translate to Innovation?

The world's most creative cities > Does it translate to Innovation? | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Tel Aviv, London, Sydney, Stockholm and Shanghai are booming with talent.


Because creativity is cultural.  [And so} the Martin Prosperity Institute at U of T’s Rotman School of Management has been studying the complex web of factors that encourage and sustain innovation in regions around the world.


The institute’s Global Creativity Index, first published in 2004,  measures a nation’s innovation potential, focusing on what it calls the Three Ts: technology, talent and tolerance.


"The GCI is really trying to help regions understand where they are," explains Kevin Stolarick, research director of the Martin Prosperity Institute. "Even when times are good, you have to worry about what comes next."


These  five cities —and some of their start-ups—are on the docket for having very bright futures.


Via Karen Steffensen
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The Innovation Cities™ Report by 2thinknow : USA Australia Canada Europe Asia

The Innovation Cities™ Report by 2thinknow : USA Australia Canada Europe Asia | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
The Innovation Cities™ Framework [ICF] by 2thinknow is a broad-based framework for measurement, comparison, planning and change in and between cities. City performance in 3 factors, 31 city industry and community segments, and 162 city indicators.
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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Change Leadership Watch
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Innovation, Impact, Change Words: Enough Talk, More Do | The Nonprofit Quarterly

Innovation, Impact, Change Words: Enough Talk, More Do | The Nonprofit Quarterly | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

This matches my current experience.  Does it match yours in the fields of innovation and change leadership?

 

Excerpt:  If you’re a nonprofit news junkie, you know it’s nearly impossible to go a day without reading or hearing the words “innovation” and “impact.

"It’s little surprise, then, that collective eyes are beginning to roll when the terms innovation and impact are tossed around with little explication as to what they look like on the ground and within a more systematic framework. So, maybe it’s time to start putting our money where our mouths are and get serious about assessing what, exactly, is true innovation; and, most important, what are the kinds of innovation that lead to real impact—especially those that can be rigorously assessed and measured..."  Source:  @npquarterly 


Via Karen Steffensen, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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5 Factors and Adoption Rate Tools to Predict Change Success with your Innovation – VinJones

5 Factors and Adoption Rate Tools to Predict Change Success with your Innovation – VinJones | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
The excerpted post below is part of a two part series that offers change and innovation adoption rate tools.


What I like about Kevin's 2-part series is that it is not about the unconvincing ROI, return on investment metric. It is about the powerful effect of stories, examples and case studies that inspire and "spark ...imagination.


His first post focuses on the five (5) factors to use to predict the rate of adoption. The second post offers tools and templates to give you an adoption rate measurement.

___________________________


Contrary to popular belief, an ROI will not convince them. ...it is stories and examples and case studies which spark their imagination. ~ Kevin Jones, vinJones.com

___________________________


Also keep in mind that change and innovation are quite different from each other. This is particularly highlighted in our two curation streams: Innovation in Institutions, Will it Blend? and the one you are reading, Change Leadership Watch.


We are also highlighting Kevin's tools on CMRsite.com, a non-partisan change management resources site.


Excerpts:


The Adoption Index
One of my favorite books is Diffusion of Innovations by Everett M. Rogers. Although this largely academic book was originally written in 1962, it hasn’t lost any of its usefulness. It explains why innovations and technologies are adopted, or not, and at what rate.


1)“Relative advantage is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as better than the idea it supersedes."


The degree of relative advantage may be measured in economic terms, but social prestige factors, convenience, and satisfaction are also important factors.”


2)“Compatibility is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as being consistent with the existing values, past experiences, and needs of potential adopters.


3)“Complexity is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as difficult to understand and use.”


Read the full post for all five factors and the link to part 2 of the series that offers adoption rate tools.



via vinjones.com

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Leading Continuous Innovation INFOGRAPHIC: Culture, Fringe Experiments, Customer Immersion

Leading Continuous Innovation INFOGRAPHIC: Culture, Fringe Experiments, Customer Immersion | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

How can change leaders support high performance, innovative teams? The infographic below cites 10 innovation strategies.  This is close.  There will be more of these process charts and innovation graphics.  


This one features:


Step 2:  Working at the organization's edges, the fringe & close to customers I've heard Dr. Jeff DeGraff talk about fringe teams this year at the Michigan Ross School of Business.


Step 3:  Culture that  supports experimentation, failure.  This is ubiquitous in mention, scarce in after-the-fact reporting.  Better known examples, 3M (Post-Its) and Google (Google Lab: Buzz, Wave, etc.)


Step 6: Customer immersion, pain points


Step 10:  Metrics, measures

 

Sources include:  Christensen & Raynor, The Innovator's Solution: Creating & Sustaining Successful Growth, 2003  


Note the continuous improvement language, adjusted slightly, a 'la W. Edwards Deming:  Ready, Aim, Fire, Adjust.  Like Plan, Do, Check, Act.


Via Jonha Richman, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Is the Metric the Message? How do we measure innovation? - O'Reilly Radar

Is the Metric the Message?  How do we measure innovation? - O'Reilly Radar | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

As the curator of this Innovation & Institutions stream, the comments on this innovation metrics post are particularly telling - especially one of the last posted comments by Perla Ni:

"What about nonprofit innovation? There's even fewer good barometers for that. There's few patents and very rarely any formal R&D expenditures (maybe there should be!).

In my observation, there's very little devoted to either spurring innovation or measuring it in the nonprofit sector. This is a shame because the nonprofit sector deals with some of the biggest and most difficult challenges of our time. Nonprofits deal with everything ranging from teaching kids how to read, to providing hospice care for the dying, to helping human rights workers safely document their findings."

Tim O'Reilly's original post begins with IP, as relevant to his own impact in the tech, innovation world:
Menions: 1) IEEE's report on Patent Power, which lists the top companies ranked by number of patents, and 2) shared, useful commentary.

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