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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Need a Job? Invent It & Learn from Finland

Need a Job? Invent It & Learn from Finland | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Finding a job is so 20th century. That is why young people today need to be more “innovation ready” than “college ready.”


We need lab schools where students earn a high school diploma by completing a series of skill-based ‘merit badges’ in things like entrepreneurship. And schools of education where all new teachers have ‘residencies’ with master teachers and performance standards — not content standards — must become the new normal throughout the system.”


Who is doing it right?


“Finland is one of the most innovative economies in the world,” he said, “and it is the only country where students leave high school ‘innovation-ready.’  They learn concepts and creativity more than facts, and have a choice of many electives — all with a shorter school day, little homework, and almost no testing.

[In the US, look at the] growing number of ‘reinvented’ colleges like the Olin College of Engineering, the M.I.T. Media Lab and the ‘D-school’ at Stanford where students learn to innovate.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The new economy is not about corporate jobs.  Haven't we seen that coming?  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 21, 2013 4:50 PM

Thomas Friedman is giving us perspective on what's here now and what's coming.  Solo-preneurs, entrepreneurs, the power of the network is becoming core to work in the new economy.   Hiding away in corporate job structures has been vaporizing, more quickly than the almost overnight shift from big cars to smaller ones in the 70s.  Are you ready?  Are your kids ready?  ~  Deb

 

Dominik Bláha's curator insight, September 24, 2013 3:45 PM

Yes!

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MOOCs, Blended Learning on Stage with Charlie Rose - Online Education

MOOCs, Blended Learning on Stage with Charlie Rose - Online Education | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"I will say the blended model, ...with certainty, is revolutionizing, higher education." "...access to a Master Teacher..."  ~ Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania


Charlie interviews:

  • Anant Agarwal, CEO of edX;
  • Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania;
  • Joel Klein, former New York City Schools chancellor and CEO of Amplify and
  • Tom Friedman of the New York 


Related posts by Deb:

  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

A blend of views discuss MOOCs and on-line education.  Note the access and pacing comments of Anant Agarwal from edX and what he's implying.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 26, 2013 2:22 PM

Pacing the learning, removing the exclusive, high expense of the classic 4 year degree, access to "Master Teachers," are some the the advantages.

An alternative view of higher education was forecast by a guest blogger on my own website who built his own degree at a much lower cost, listed above, "Right Sizing..."   ~ Deb

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Moving Beyond Surreptitious Manager Improv, Risk & Reward, Emerging Best Practice in your Org, Steve Leybourne

Moving Beyond Surreptitious Manager Improv, Risk & Reward, Emerging Best Practice in your Org, Steve Leybourne | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Managers improvise all the time, surreptitiously, outside of processes & strategies, in order to deal with compression of time & resources."  


How to make it work, Boston Univ.,  Asst. Professor views, referencing the financial industry.


My notes from the video:


Steve Leybourne covers the softer, challenging elements of work, confirming that more than ever, work is not predictable. It is doing too much, with too little, and so, managers improvise all the time, surreptitiously.  


Managers then work outside of processes, strategies, goals and plans, so there is risk.   Managers will this on your own, and expose themselves to failure.  If things go right, they will have an emerging best practice. But if they fail, then they are really exposed.    See the full Improvisation in Organizations video here.



________________________


Successful improvisation produces better ways of achieving tasks = emerging best practice.  -  Steve Leybourne, Asst. Professor, Boston University


________________________



The model pictured from the video features:


Three constructs: Creativity, Intuition & Bricolage (making the best of whatever resources you have at hand) from Moorman & Miner (1998.) They define improvisation as:
"the degree to which composition and execution converge in time."



Add in three more from their later research, Adaptation, Compression, Innovation (deviation from existing practices & knowledge) leading to Learning. Miner et. al. Minnesota (2001)


Leybourne lists these added three as outputs, which, in the model depicted lead to learning that is fed back into the process.   Adaptive routines are actually outputs to the next round of improvisations.


________________________


It is doing too much, with too little, and so, managers improvise all the time, surreptitiously.

________________________



He also covers what can go wrong in improvisation, how to build trust within a team to improvise, and dealing with ambiguity, poor specifications.


See the full Improvisation in Organizations video here.


Thanks to Sources:  Rutger Slump and Steve Leybourne,  guest speaker at de Baak about Improvisation in Organizations. He is a assistant professor at Boston University in Innovation and Entrepreneurship. letsplayinnovation.wordpress.com



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Tinkering and Technological Imagination, Mitch Resnick, Professor of Learning Research at the MIT Media Lab

Tinkering and Technological Imagination, Mitch Resnick, Professor of Learning Research at the MIT Media Lab | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Which companies create space for the adult level of tinkering?


"If we want more young people to choose a profession in one of the group of crucial fields known as STEM — science, technology, engineering and math — we ought to start cultivating these interests and skills early.  But the way to do so may not be the kind of highly structured and directed instruction that we usually associate with these subjects." ~ Time: In Praise of Tinkering.

 

A helpful video on tinkering is here, by Mitch Resnick, Professor of Learning Research at the MIT Media Lab.   Mitch is interviewed by Howard Rheingold, a cyberculture pioneer, social media innovator, and author of "Smart Mobs." In this video, he discusses the role of "making, tinkering, remixing" in next-generation learning and education.

 

Mitch develops new technologies and activities to engage people (especially children) in creative learning experiences. He is on the conference committee for the 2012 Digital Media & Learning Conference in San Francisco, Calif., Mar. 1-3.

 

 


Via Karen Steffensen
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The Nature of the Future – Review | Harold Jarche

The Nature of the Future – Review | Harold Jarche | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Marina Gorbis identifies unique human skills [that] should be the core of any public education program.


  • Sensemaking
  • Social and emotional intelligence
  • Novel and adaptive thinking
  • Moral and ethical reasoning


As Gorbis write... “Learning is Social”.


We need to learn how to work better with machines, letting machines do what they are good at.


Gorbis shows how machines and average people can outperform experts at playing chess. 


“Weak human + machine + better process

was superior to a strong computer alone

and, more remarkably,superior to a

strong human + machine + inferior process.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's not just the skills, it's the social and the process, lest all the talk about MOOCs and universities and skill training lead to engineering and accounting.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 26, 2013 2:39 PM

Sensemaking of MOOCs and adaptive learning.  Trust a smart process.  ~ Deb

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Success Case Study: Pitching a Learning Tool Directly to Professors

Success Case Study:  Pitching a Learning Tool Directly to Professors | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Instead of convincing universities to take a chance on its classroom engagement platform, Top Hat Monocle made direct contact with professors who asked students to also pick up the tab.


...most students carried mobile devices...which could be used for in-class interaction. [The founders] ...developed a prototype product that focused on quizzing and polling students, and pilot-tested the prototype in two classes.


_____________________

Large organizations have a very long sales cycle ... catch them outside of [their] budget cycle, you may not get another chance for a year or two.

_____________________



“Selling to large organizations like universities, governments and big corporations is difficult and time-consuming. Large organizations have a very long sales cycle and if you catch them outside of a budget cycle, you may not get another chance for a year or two.”



THE SOLUTION

The founders decided to “consumerize the classroom” by focusing on individual professors, rather than universities. This made sense because the value proposition was focused on the classroom and because professors have much latitude in making adoption decisions.

THE RESULT


This academic year, it is being used by 2,000 professors and more than 150,000 students at 300 universities worldwide. More than 80 per cent of these universities are in the United States.


The company has 75 employees, offices in three countries, and has been able to raise another $9.1-million in financing.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

If you've seen drug companies advertising in the media directly to you, vs. your doctor or health system, you've seen another angle on this.  How do innovative ideas take hold in your institution today?  ~  Deb

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Open Innovation & Organizational Boundaries, in Institutions, Will it Blend? — HBS Working Knowledge

Open Innovation & Organizational Boundaries, in Institutions, Will it Blend? — HBS Working Knowledge | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Open innovation, enabled by low-cost communication and the decreased costs of memory and computation, has transformed markets and social relations.


As the authors illustrate, it will be challenging to manage contrasting modes of innovation, and that is exactly what is needed in organizations that expect to innovate and are systemically, culturally, not set up to help this happen. 



Excerpts:

Open innovation, in contrast to firm-centered innovation, is radically decentralized, peer based, and includes intrinsic and pro-social motives.


The authors of this working paper use in-depth examples from Apple, NASA, and Lego to argue that open innovation will at least complement, if not increasingly substitute for, more traditional innovation modes.


This is within the contexts of increasing modularity and decreased communication costs.   (DN:  Just look at digital communication today.  Think ahead 4 months to 1 year of what's next.)


Emerging theories must be informed by these contrasting innovation modes and the implications for governance, incentives, intellectual property, managerial choice, professional and organizational identity, and organizational cultures.


Key concepts include:


  • Leaders and senior teams can take advantage of contrasting innovation modes, paradoxical organizational requirements, and associated dynamic boundaries.

.

  • Leaders need to execute strategic choices with the systems, structures, incentives, cultures, and boundaries tailored to open and firm-based innovation modes.
.
  • Multiple types of boundaries will increasingly be employed to manage innovation, from traditional to complex intra firm boundaries (such as ambidextrous designs), to webs of interdependence with partners and potentially anonymous communities.
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  • Senior teams must build their capabilities to deal with contradictions as well as their organization's ability to embrance contradictions.  


A link to the full working paper, downloadable by Assistant Professor, Karim R. Lakhani & colleague is here.


Source:  Karim R. Lakhani is an assistant professor in the Technology and Operations Management unit at Harvard Business School.  


This link was also recommended by Jeffrey DeGraff at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, and I also think it's right on, even if the language is quite academic.  It will make you think about your institutional systems, and refresh your vocabulary.    ~  Deb

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