Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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The Myth of Crowdfunding (or The Crowdfunding Hydra)

The Myth of Crowdfunding (or The Crowdfunding Hydra) | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Judy offers an experienced note of caution against over reliance on any single element in such a critical area of your organization’s mission as its fundraising. After all, quite often if your fundraising fails, so does your mission.Sometimes it can feel like any problem we face today can be ‘solved’ by throwing the internet at it.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Judy identifies aspects of the "bright and shiny object" effect of crowd-(insert the blank) - sourcing, funding, guessing, contributing, conversing.  Like the beasts in cave-paintings of old, the first blog posts, one can be nourished or devoured by the such objects of our attention.  ~  Deb

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Streamlining by Going Online with Faculty Promotion and Tenure Resources

Streamlining by Going Online with Faculty Promotion and Tenure Resources | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Facing the administrative burden of promotion/tenure for roughly 240 candidates each year, the University of Florida developed an online promotion and tenure work process.

   

....Outcomes
After only a year and a half of full implementation, outcomes have included:

  • a 90 percent reduction in paper, 
  • a reduction in printing and administrative costs, 
  • a marked reduction in work time for faculty and staff, 
  • consistency and conformance within the tenure review process, 
  • easier accessibility to promotion and tenure packets for academic reviewers, 
  • improved transparency at all review levels, and 
  • the ability for tenure candidates to monitor their progress throughout the cycle. 

      
The cost savings for the first year alone was nearly $203,000.


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here's a university that did something to update the wasteful and inefficient tenure review process.  This included reducing paper-intensive practices by 90% and providing progress reports to tenure candidates.

     

It remains to be seen how other universities handle the larger promotion and tenure process in the 21st century, connected with changes in higher education as a whole.  ~  Deb

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Warren Berger Tells How to Ask a ‘Beautiful Question’ - How to Amplify Innovation & Performance

Warren Berger Tells How to Ask a ‘Beautiful Question’ - How to Amplify Innovation & Performance | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

A More Beautiful Question by Warren Berger is about the importance of asking thoughtful, ambitious "beautiful questions"—the kind that can bring about change in the world around you.


How do you define a "beautiful question"?
 

Warren Berger:  The term is inspired by this line from the poet E.E. Cummings: "Always the beautiful answer who asks a more beautiful question."

The way I define a beautiful question in the book is: "An ambitious, yet actionable, question that can begin to change the way we think about something—and might serve as a catalyst to bring about change."


For example, when someone steps back and asks, Why are we doing things the way we've been doing them the past 20 years—what if we tried a whole new approach? That's a beautiful question.


- See more at: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/03/08/warren-berger-tells-how-to-ask-a-beautiful-question.html#sthash.Y9LUzjHR.dpuf

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

In the consulting world, it's shared that a good consultant knows how to ask good questions.  This article amplifies performance and innovation by interviewing the author about breakthroughs (the cell phone, the Internet), helpful organizations (The Red Cross, the Olympics) that started with a question.

So the weird, the unusual, the provocative can end up being the beautiful when it comes to a great, powerful question.  ~  Deb 

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Harvard Woman Demos 3D Printed Makeup, Industry Disruption In Mind

Harvard Woman Demos 3D Printed Makeup, Industry Disruption In Mind | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
"We’re going to live in a world where you can take a picture of your friend’s lipstick and print it out," says the founder.


Grace Choi was at Harvard Business School when she decided to disrupt the beauty industry. She researched and realized that "The makeup industry makes a whole lot of money on a whole lot of bulls**t,"  Choi said at TechCrunch Disrupt this week.


"They charge a huge premium on something that tech provides for free. That one thing is color."


Color printers are available to everyone, and the ink they have is the same as the ink makeup companies use in their products. She also says the ink is FDA approved.

She demonstrated how it works, then brushed some of the freshly-printed makeup onto her hand. 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Choi shows just how susceptible the beauty industry is to disruption with her 3D printer and company, Mink.   As email and the internet disrupted the US Postal Service and the media industry, 3D printing attracts entrepreneurs who are ready to disrupt long standing, premium priced industries like beauty products.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 2014 4:10 PM

Choi shows just how susceptible the beauty industry is to disruption with her 3D printer and company, Mink.   As email and the internet disrupted the US Postal Service and the media industry, 3D printing attracts entrepreneurs who are ready to disrupt long standing, premium priced industries like beauty products.  ~  Deb

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Everything old is new again, Fax to Phone, ADDIE to DADDIE, Simon to iPhone

“...it takes on average 20 years for a technology to make the transition from first articulation to maturity (defined as becoming a $1billion industry)…the mouse, for example, took 30 years. “ – Bill Buxton, Principle researcher MicrosoftPatent

This SlideShare features the evolution of the inventions of the fax machine,  first envisioned and patented in 1843 by Scotsman Alexander Bain, improved on by others, then once again by Giovanni Castelli, an Italian priest.  In 1865, Castelli went on to establish the first Paris public fax service.  The service worked over telegraph lines and ran between Paris and Lyon.  ...This was still 11 years before the invention of the telephone.


Presentation by Stephanie Rieger of Yiibu at the MobX Conference in Berlin, Germany November 17, 2012.
        

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This slideshare provides research and insights into the pace of adoption for innovation, such as invention of the fax machine and THEN the telephone.  It follows my recent ScoopIt about ADDIE evolving to DADDIE for instructional design.

Quote from the article, "we don't always know the true value of a technology until a related one comes along."  


A colleague also shared in the ADDIE to DADDIE example,  "recent approaches may be old processes in new packaging, each with their own value and merit."  Adapt, evolve, reinvent. ~ D

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Twelve (12) Rising Innovation Trends From the 50 Most Innovative Companies of 2014 - Fast Co.

Twelve (12) Rising Innovation Trends From the 50 Most Innovative Companies of 2014 - Fast Co. | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

The culture of innovation across the globe is more robust than ever. Here are 5 innovation trends excerpted from the full list of 12 from Fast Company's World's 50 Most Innovative Companies of 2014:

   

1)  EXCEPTIONAL IS EXPECTED   Google, the No. 1 company, did not land there for the range of its activities--despite the 29 achievements we list. ...today's smartest businesses tend to laser-focus on just a few goals; broad ambition can distract from the nitty-gritty required to turn goals into reality. Yet from Google Fiber to Google Glass to investing in new health technologies, Google executes at a high level repeatedly. That's why it tops the list.

________________________
     

How do you make meaningful change in the face of calcified institutions? Sometimes you just have to go around them.

    

________________________
      

    
2.   INNOVATION IS EPISODIC   ....From breakthrough change at Philips (No. 50), development of LED lighting has been under way there for 50 years--and a specific 11-month deadline provided the essential innovative exclamation point.
     

3.  MAKING MONEY MATTERS
….great businesses are self-sustaining. Dropbox (No. 4) and Airbnb (No. 6) are darlings of the venture set, but they also charge real customers real money for a product with real value. Unlike …pre-2008 whose business models rely on advertising for revenue (Facebook, Twitter, et al.), these enterprises are transaction based--and are reaping the rewards.

     


5.  SUSTAINABILITY HAS FOUND A NEW GEAR
…Today, energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and recycling are core advantages for successful enterprises. Brazil's Braskem (No. 41), a $19 billion petrochemical giant, uses sugarcane rather than oil to create in-demand plastics. Levi Strauss (No. 30) produces more than 10% of its clothing with recycled materials, on its way to 100%. ....You don't have to own a Tesla (No. 20) to see the impact.


7. CONFLICT ISN'T REQUIRED
How do you make meaningful change in the face of calcified institutions? Sometimes you just have to go around them. …DonorsChoose.org (No. 9) …avoidied unions and politicos by crowdsourcing direct assistance to teachers. Bloomberg Philanthropies (No. 2) uses data to answer questions other foundations aren't asking and SHoP Architects (No. 33) manages to both create cutting-edge designs à la indie firms and get them built at the appropriately industrial scale.


See the full list of 12 here.

 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

These qualities are a good list to compare to other global company innovation lists, such as from Forbes.  Money is high on the list of 12, yet other qualities bear a look, compared to Forbes rankings based on the difference between their market capitalization and a net present value of cash flows from existing businesses.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 26, 2014 3:18 PM

This is a good list to compare to other global company innovation lists, such as from Forbes.  Money is high on the list of 12, yet other qualities bear a look, compared to Forbes rankings based on the difference between their market capitalization and a net present value of cash flows from existing businesses.  ~  D

Richard Platt's curator insight, February 26, 2014 11:43 PM

Pretty sure that I don't agree with some of what's on this list, but hey have a look, everybody's entitled to an opinion

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Manufacturing, US Department of Energy & the Power Electronics Innovation Institute at NC State University

Manufacturing, US Department of Energy & the Power Electronics Innovation Institute at NC State University | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

President Barack Obama and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have tapped NC State to lead a $140 million advanced manufacturing institute that will unite academic, government and industry partners in an effort to revolutionize energy efficiency across a wide range of applications, including electronic devices, power grids and electric vehicles.

Learn about the next generation Power Electronics Innovation Institute at NC State University and the game-changing promise of wide bandgap semiconductors. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This has tapped the attention of the president, connected to work by the FREEDM Systems Center launched by NC State and the National Science Foundation in 2008.  The FREEDM Center is described as building the electric power grid of the future naming 56 corporate and academic partners,   It is described as the model for the Next Generation Power Electronics Innovation Institute.

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Remote Control for Daily Living: Google's Nest Deal & Mobile

Remote Control for Daily Living: Google's Nest Deal & Mobile | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Google’s proposed acquisition of Nest Labs for $3.2 billion is reflective of how the definition of mobile is changing ...[to include] wearables, connected cars, smart appliances and other hardware 


_____________
   

...the mobile phone ...a..remote control for everyday life...

   

_____________

 

The deal is the latest move by Google to extend its mobile business with an eye toward making smartphones and tablets the [the means] to connect with other devices throughout their day.

   

“Google's acquisition of Nest makes the mobile phone a consumer's remote control for everyday life,” said Andrea Wilson, Fort Worth, TX-based vice president, strategy director and luxury practice lead at iProspect.


.....Android is already the most widely used mobile operating system in the world. A recent report from Gartner found that Android accounted for nearly 82 percent of all smartphone sales during the third quarter of 2013.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:
Ken Burbary writes up a helpful piece on where Google is headed.

Having recently switched to a Droid Samsung S4 for its amazing voice recognition and texting enhancements, while remaining a die-hard Apple fan, suggests that Ken is onto the key intention of Google to be a part of our everyday lives.  Google Glass anyone?
Examples:
  • I love the Gee Whiz of my factor of my phone, to run Roku or Aero off my TV, especially when the Roku remote WAS NOT working.
   
  • Taking photos of checks for deposit is pretty cool.  Yes, any phone can do this, but hey, the key fact is we ARE doing it - adult kids and parents in the house.
    
  • Boomers are helping each other learn their phones, perhaps on those bus rides to Stratford (Shakespeare plays.)
   
  • Sorry Siri, but Google voice on a Droid can set my alarm clock just as easily, and has amazing voice recognition accuracy.
      
If you've used your phone with smart appliances, a smart furnance / AC or such, tell us how it is working.    Best, ~  Deb
 
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27 Ways to Inspire Students to Innovate

27 Ways to Inspire Students to Innovate | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Educator Mia MacMeekin made this infographic about ways to inspire students to think more deeply about how innovation applies to them.


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Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

After taking a look at this catchy infographic, what does innovation mean to you?  ~  D

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, November 29, 2013 7:36 PM

Creative activities that can allow the students to develop innovative thinking.

Richard Platt's curator insight, December 8, 2013 11:40 PM

(from the Curator of IoT & Wearables): We've stayed away from many academic's re: how to enable students to be better at problem solving and innovating, (because most academics think they already know what innovation and complex problem solving is all about and well not to put too fine a point on it they just don't),  

 

We do take issue wtih the status quo of academia.  Obviously we have strongly held views on engineering education and problem solving / innovaiton, but they are warranted and justified.

 

We see most academic work in the area of innovating, problem solving / problem finding and more specifically in complex problem solving in the domain of engineering  to be broken., biased and prejudicial  

 

Nonetheless we do give credit in this post by Mia MacMeekin as it is a move in the right direction, we just don't see it going far enough to make problem solving and problem finding cool or effective enough for students to really be able to do anything significant with when it comes time for them to contribute.  Sorry we call it as we see it..  

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3 Creativity Challenges: 30 Circles & Mind, Empathy Maps | HBR Blogs

3 Creativity Challenges: 30 Circles & Mind, Empathy Maps | HBR Blogs | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Innovation requires practice.


Mindmaps are a powerful way to overcome fear of the blank page, look for patterns, explore a subject, come up with truly innovative ideas, record their evolution so you can trace back in search of new insights, and communicate your thought processes to others.

While lists help you capture the thoughts you already have, mindmaps help to generate wildly new ones. 

[The] 30 Circles exercise is a great warm-up and also highlights the balance between fluency (the speed and quantity of ideas) and flexibility (how different or divergent they are). 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've heard, and experienced from time to time, that innovation and creativity is something that is not expected or even welcomed in jobs. 

In a previous Scooped post (reposted next to this one), research on creativity indicates...coworkers.... don't even know what a creative idea looks like and that creativity, hailed as a positive change agent, actually makes people squirm.


So, yes, exercises, tools like this matter, maybe a lot.  ~  D

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U-M Human Resource Development's curator insight, November 8, 2013 11:39 AM

Thanks for sharing this Deb! Yes, I agree. Sometimes innovation and creativity seems to "frighten" some people/jobs. Once we all get over the "stagefright" the sooner we can all start growing!

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The Innovation List: The 50 Greatest Breakthroughs Since the Wheel

The Innovation List:  The 50 Greatest Breakthroughs Since the Wheel | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Why did it take so long to invent the wheelbarrow? Have we hit peak innovation? What our list reveals about imagination, optimism, and the nature of progress.


...

The List

The Atlantic asked a dozen scientists, historians, and technologists to rank the top innovations since the wheel. 

The clearest example of consensus was the first item on the final compilation, the printing press. Ten of the 12 people who submitted rankings had it at or near the top. To draw another parallel to our Influential Americans survey, the printing press was the counterpart to Abraham Lincoln as the clear consensus for the top choice. 


Innovations that expand the human intellect and its creative, expressive, and even moral possibilities. This group includes the printing press (1) and also  paper, (6) and now of course the Internet, (9) the personal computer, (16) and the underlying technology for the modern data age, semiconductorelectronics (4), plus photography (29). 


Innovations that enabled the Industrial Revolution and its successive waves of expanded material output. These include the steam engine (10), industrial steelmaking (19), and the refining and drilling of oil (35 and 39, respectively). 



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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I agree with the author:  developing a list like this conveys a sense of identity of where we've been and where we are.  

Does it imply where we are going next with innovation?    ~  Deb

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From Industrial Age to the Internet, Big Data Age - Making the Change, Innovation

From Industrial Age to the Internet, Big Data Age - Making the Change, Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Over the last 200 years, the world has experienced several waves of innovation, which successful companies learned to navigate. The Industrial Revolution brought machines and factories that powered economies of scale and scope, making a profound impact on society and the culture of the world. With the Internet Revolution we have seen the rise of computing power, information sharing and data networks, fundamentally changing the way we connect (on whatever device).


Via jean lievens, FRANK FEATHER ~ Business Futurist
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

We still have many Industrial Age mindsets to overcome in business.  This piece helps us look at how we can and are adapting.  ~ D

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Why Steve Jobs Never Listened to His Customers - Sheltered Innovation and Crowdsourcing

Why Steve Jobs Never Listened to His Customers  - Sheltered Innovation and Crowdsourcing | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Does innovation require listening to your customers? Or is to better to ignore them?  "It's really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times, people don't know what they want until you show it to them."— Steve Jobs    Also:  What worked for Steve Jobs may not work for your company.

    

The Benefits of Sheltered Innovation


Multiple studies have shown that individuals have a tendency to produce the most novel ideas when working alone (as opposed to crowdsourcing ideas from an external group).


  • But can this focus on the internal creativity of teams really have a place in the business world?

  • Should customers be ignored?


According to Mario D’Amico, senior VP of marketing at Cirque du Soleil, the answer is, well, maybe.


...was Jobs right or not?

Many respected entrepreneurs would say that yes, he was right ... but only for theextremely unconventional and circumstantial situation that his company was in.


...understanding your customers’ wants is a pivotal part of growing your business—but doesn’t have to restrict your innovation.


Read more:   https://www.helpscout.net/blog/why-steve-jobs-never-listened-to-his-customers/


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The Wisdom of Crowds has individual and collective component, when you dig down deep.  The JCPenney example cited in this story is also a good cautionary tale.  ~  D

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...Innovation Will Have To Be 'Heart And Mind,' Or Nothing At All" ~ Dr Kobus Neethling

...Innovation Will Have To Be 'Heart And Mind,' Or Nothing At All" ~ Dr Kobus Neethling | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

In [Dr. Neethling's]  work in more than 30 countries and which spans two decades, he has witnessed an overbearing close-minded perspective on innovation---as if innovation is predominantly a discipline of ‘things’.
    
He goes on to say:
The shaping of a better planet for all of us is and will become even more complicated and unpredictable and therefore we will need a new kind of wisdom, courage and purpose-driven passion to innovate for the benefit of all.  


______________________
   
What's needed?  "Respect for and inclusion of ideas from every group affected by the innovation."

    

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....the groundbreaking innovations of the 20th century...served only the needs of a few. Naturally we have to continue our pursuit of cutting edge technology, ideas and systems. but the context in which these innovations take place, is and remains the fundamental issue.   

    

Of all the innovations ....the one that comes the closest to heart and mind innovation and the one that considered the context of the dramatic changes that the innovation would bring with immense sensitivity is the creation of a new South Africa.

     

In a television series that I wrote called ‘Creating a miracle’ I highlighted the critical factors which led to this unique societal innovation.

    

  • A rare integration of spiritual, creative and pragmatic leadership
  • A bringing together of opposite visions into a single shared vision
  • The creation of new symbols, values, attitudes, principles, customs and practices (and the letting go of the traditions, norms and conventions which would obstruct or frustrate the creation of a free and democratic society)
  • Respect for and inclusion of ideas from every group affected by the innovation
  • An extraordinary insight into the essence of the innovation that was required

      

As my mentor Paul Torrance said many times: “Creative people can perform miracles but they are always in danger of crucifixion”



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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Yes, it is time to, as Dr. Neethling says, elaborate on Aristotle: “Innovating the mind without innovating the heart is no innovation at all,” Lessons from a fully co-created innovation in South Africa has insights for us all.  

I became aware of Dr. Neethling's work through the whole brain assessment, the NBI.  I'm glad to see how much more there is to benefit us all.  ~  Deb

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Your Innovation Lab: 5 Ways to build it from Client & Customer Feedback

Your Innovation Lab: 5 Ways to build it from Client & Customer Feedback | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Your users are smarter than you; ask them what they think of your product and how you can improve it. In a recent re-launch, our best ideas really weren't our ideas at all. They were our users' ideas. Here's to listening. And to not believing the Henry Ford hype [building a faster horse.]"  

Excerpted:


1) Encourage feedback.     [Many] businesses don’t want anything to do with you after you’ve paid. …when you get a question, suggestion, or request, provide a good answer, and say “Keep it coming."

   

2) Minimize distance between support and product development.    ….when a request comes in, it’s easy and natural to pass that request on to whomever actually has the power to implement it. If it gets unstructured, put it into a weekly ideas/improvements/feedback discussion.

     

3) Facilitate for feedback.      Giving feedback should be easy. Make the support form(s) easily accessible. Don’t hide them away to avoid customer nagging.  ….Nagging is good. Change the internal name from “Customer Service” to “Sales and Product Development”, if that’s the visible change you need. Feel free to add “Ninja Team” or whatever…  ….you owe them not to get snobbish about how they’re “permitted” to contact you.

    

4) Answer (quickly), and ask for more.   Waiting  for a reply is annoying. Not getting a reply at all angers people so deeply that they’ll go through fire and ice to tell the world how much you suck. Answer, and if you answer late, apologize for it.
   
…Say what went wrong, without lying, and without complicating things …And then ask for more feedback. This one’s really great. They might have yelled at you, and now you’re inviting them to yell some more?! Try it, they’ll open up like never before.

    

5) Make their feedback worth their time  ….thank them, and let them know that it’s going….  And when/if you implement it, follow up on it, and let them know that it’s now live, thanks to them. Surprise people by showing that you actually appreciate their feedback.

    

As for all Scoops, click on the photo or title to see the full article.

   

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Once you have a client or customer, why not make the most of it?  You may then have that customer for years, if you know how to best respond to their comments and feedback which this article aptly describes. ~  D

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Tufts University Named Best Open-source School in America, Tools for Innovation

Tufts University Named Best Open-source School in America, Tools for Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

In May 15, 2014, researchers backed by Spanish software download site Portal Programas published a report naming Tufts University the number one open-source university in the United States. 

Tufts received an overall score of 100, followed by Utah State (93.01) and the University of Notre Dame (57.10).  Two other Massachusetts universities scored in the top 15:  University of Massachusetts Boston (4th) and MIT (14th), ranking Massachusetts only behind Utah in states where colleges and universities actively participate in open source projects and the operational use of open-source software.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'm a fan of Tufts open source tool VUE, a powerful tool for organizing, creating, linking, and curating. It's a great tools to help innovation.  A sample tool I created from VUE is here, a retreat planning flowchart, which was used in a faculty retreat to explain the retreat planning process.  ~  D

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Compensation Bloat? University of Michigan faculty question administrator pay in open letter

Compensation Bloat?  University of Michigan faculty question administrator pay in open letter | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

An open letter to University of Michigan's Board of Regents from about a dozen of the school's faculty criticizes the school's administrative pay and bonus system. "The University is in desperate and urgent need of fiscal reform." 


____________________
   
The authors argue that U-M is not transparent about its pay supplements...some administrators received...in excess of $50,000.

     

____________________


The authors argue that U-M is not transparent about its pay supplements, and that they are an unwise use of money from the general fund. Data obtained by the professors show that some administrators received salary supplements in excess of $50,000.

  

...Anthony Mora, a history professor who helped author the letter, said that while it's reasonable executive officers have higher compensation that most staff, U-M's compensation rates for those officers are between 27 and 41 percent higher than the rates' of administrators at peer institutions such as Berkeley, Texas and Virginia, according to a review done by the faculty.
 

"We want to have an open and candid discussion about the university's resources," Mora said. "I don't see this as an effort to be adversarial with the administration. I think people in the administration are genuine when they say they care about the university. But I do think there's an opportunity here for the faculty and the administration to work together."

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The escalating costs of higher education may no longer be taken for granted with such moves as these from the core of  the university system, the faculty.

The article also referenced the initially poorly implemented, cost cutting administrative shared services initiative (labeled AST, Administrative Services Transformation)  that did not include the faculty voice in its cost cutting planning and involved the use of several consulting firms with expenses totalling over 11 million for consulting services.  As as consultant myself, I know consultant have reasons to charge a high rate, but leaving the faculty voice out of a change initiative mystifies me.


I look forward to hearing where this letter leads in dealing with, perhaps, some unquestioned compensation practices.   ~  Deb


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 25, 2014 4:05 PM

Several faculty have taken up the gauntlet to question escalating costs - starting with higher education administrative bonuses.  Executive bonuses may no longer be taken for granted with such moves as these, perhaps prompted by the poorly planned, cost cutting administrative shared services initiative (labeled AST, Administrative Services Transformation)  which, incidentally, did NOT include the faculty voice in its cost cutting planning.


It also involved the use of several consulting firms with expenses totalling over 11 million for consulting services.  As as consultant myself, I know consultant have reasons to charge a high rate, but leaving the faculty voice out of a change initiative mystifies me.


I look forward to hearing where this letter leads in dealing with, perhaps, some unquestioned compensation practices, and perhaps stepping higher education back to a bigger picture of where the value generation resides and how it needs to be valued today.   ~  Deb

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5 Examples of Companies Innovating with Crowdsourcing

5 Examples of Companies Innovating with Crowdsourcing | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"The rapid exchange of data needed to maintain competitiveness demands access to multiple, fluid sources of information.  Crowdsourcing helps this happen."

        

Excerpts, 3 examples:
    

Anheuser-Busch (AB)– The world’s leading brewer, ...sought customer input to develop a brand more attuned to craft-beer tastes. Development of Black Crown, a golden amber lager, combined a competition between company-brewmasters with consumer suggestions and tastings; this project had more than 25,000 consumer-collaborators.


Coca-Cola– Coke now uses a more open business model, assuming an increasingly prominent position in corporate crowdsourcing. Its open-sourced “Shaping a Better Future” challenge asks entrepreneurs to create improvement-ventures for the project-hubs of youth employment, education, environment and health.

ucts more effectively, once again tying social media to co-creation.  


Unilever– Despite its globally-recognized and respected research staff and facilities, Unilever understands the value of collaboration with innovative partners from outside the firm. It seeks external contributions from anyone with useful input into such diverse project challenges as storing renewable energy, fighting viruses, reducing the quantity of sodium in food, creating cleaning-products that pollute less.


Click the title to see the full list of 5.


Related tools & [posts by Deb:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here are some current, corporate examples of crowdsourcing, which is also finding its way to government and non-profits as well.   Some say that anything corporate, or having top-down management of the project or guidance from an external organisation for solely commercial constructs is not crowdsourcing.

Regardless, now that complex, adaptive systems has arrived as a part of the conversation, along with terms like  M4IS2  (Multinational, Multiagency, Multidisciplinary, Multidomain Information-Sharing and Sense-Making)  - crowdsourcing will have a chance to prove if it is a sign of our times, including concepts of creative destruction and reinvention. ~ D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 26, 2014 3:12 PM

Here are some current, corporate examples of crowdsourcing, which is also finding its way to government and non-profits as well.   Some say that anything corporate, or having top-down management of the project or guidance from an external organisation for solely commercial constructs is not crowdsourcing.

Regardless, now that complex, adaptive systems has arrived as a part of the conversation, along with terms like  M4IS2  (Multinational, Multiagency, Multidisciplinary, Multidomain Information-Sharing and Sense-Making)  - crowdsourcing will have a chance to prove if it is a sign of our times, including concepts of creative destruction and reinvention. ~ D

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The World's Top 50 Most Innovative Companies 2014

The World's Top 50 Most Innovative Companies 2014 | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

There's another kind of faith in business: the belief that a product or service can radically remake an industry, change consumer habits, challenge economic assumptions. Proof for such innovative leaps is thin....Yet breakthrough progress often requires wide-eyed hope.

From the list of 50:

1) GOOGLE
FOR BECOMING A $350 BILLION GIANT THAT LETS LOOSE ALMOST TOO MANY INNOVATIONS AND MILESTONES TO COUNT.


2) BLOOMBERG PHILANTHROPIES
For doing good, methodically, using data to answer questions other foundations aren't asking


3) XIAOMI
FOR REINVENTING THE SMARTPHONE BUSINESS MODEL IN THE WORLD'S LARGEST MOBILE MARKET.


7) NIKE
For setting a sustainable example.


9) DONORSCHOOSE.ORG
FOR SETTING ITS SIGHTS ON EDUCATION REFORM,…avoiding unions and politicos by crowdsourcing direct assistance to teachers. 


11) DODGE
For being a part of the conversation, no matter what.


15) MICHAEL KORS
FOR WINNING TWO FASHION RACES AT ONCE


See the 50 companies, the full list here.


Related tools & posts by Deb:


     

      

 

Photo via Fast Company- featuring DonorsChoose.org
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Fast company has a mix of what defines innovative companies that mixes old and new, connected to adaptability and flexibility.  

See the companion article on the 12 rising innovation qualities spotted in this 2014 list of companies as well as a comment comparing innovative company ranking methods to Forbes.
 ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 11, 2014 9:19 AM

The top innovative companies have leaders who know how to sense and respond, as well as adapt.  ~  D

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Scaling Up in the UK: Zapp App Enables Millions of Shoppers to Pay by SmartPhone

Scaling Up in the UK:  Zapp App Enables Millions of Shoppers to Pay by SmartPhone | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Millions of consumers will be able to use a smartphone app to pay for purchases this year in the latest shift away from cash and card payments.

 

Known as Zapp, the app is due to launch in the autumn and will be available to 18 million UK current account holders with HSBC, First Direct, Nationwide, Santander and Metro Bank.

 

The mobile payment system will only work for online purchases initially, but Peter Keenan, chief executive of Zapp, said he expects it to be enabled for at least one in five store payments from late 2015, meaning that consumers can "leave their wallets at home".


From another article about smartphone app payments in the US from The Verge:

There are two primary means of paying with your phone at a brick-and-mortar store: scan to pay using a QR code, and tap to pay using Near-Field Communication, or NFC. As the market battle rages over which pay-by-phone technology will win out, LevelUp has decided to hedge its bets with a new piece of hardware that supports both.  

Related tools by Deb:

     

  • Stay in touch & dont miss a thing with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE curation streams @Deb Nystrom, REVELN, featuring two approaches to change via once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.

 


Via JWT_WOW, 15marches
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Mobile is getting even bigger, scaling up in the UK.  As for leaving your wallet at home?  Eventually.  Google Wallet and Square, and now LevelUp are 3 apps in the USA for paying by smartphone.  They are in limited use.  The UK will be a new test of scaling BIG for smartphone app payments.  ~ Deb


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Zappos says Goodbye to Bosses & Bureaucracy - Hello to Holacracy

Zappos says Goodbye to Bosses & Bureaucracy - Hello to Holacracy | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

The famed, unique Las Vegas-based shoe retailer...will eliminate traditional managers, do away with the typical corporate hierarchy and get rid of job titles, at least internally.

__________________
 
....bureaucracy ...was getting in the way of adaptability.”

    

__________________


The unusual approach is called a “holacracy,” replacing the traditional corporate chain of command with a series of overlapping, self-governing “circles.” In theory, this gives employees more of a voice in the way the company is run.


According to Zappos executives, the move is an effort to keep the 1,500-person company from becoming too rigid, too unwieldy and too bureaucratic as it grows.


“As we scaled, we noticed that the bureaucracy we were all used to was getting in the way of adaptability,” says Zappos’s John Bunch, who is helping lead the transition to the new structure.


Holacracy ...has a couple of high-profile devotees — Twitter cofounder Evan Williams uses it at his new company, Medium, and time management guru David Allen uses it run his firm — but Zappos is by far the largest company to adopt the idea.]


Related posts & tools by Deb:


  • Don't miss a thing:  We'll send Best of the Best news, from Deb's 9 curation streams@Deb Nystrom, REVELN (includes: change, agile learning, performance, careers), once a month via email, directly to you, for free.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

      



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'm intrigued to see this second emergence of holacracy.  Do we have an agile organizational structure developing here?

I'm sensing the far edge of a trend here, especially after facilitating Open Space events (self-led interest topics on a theme) in the last couple of years,.  I've mostly used them in a professional learning context, although three client organizations have used this organic, adaptible format for planning & strategy.  


In my view. it seems that these leaders are shifting perspective, letting go of some of the trappings of the 90's, to embrance more adaptive structures that can help fuel innovation.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 6, 2014 8:44 PM

Adaptive communication.  It's time for something far beyond Fredrick Taylor's scientific management 1920's style bureacraciy.  I'm sensing this is the calm before the storm of change to move beyond traditional management structures.  There will be more holacracies and their kin to come.  ~  D

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Google Reveals Its 9 Principles of Innovation

Google Reveals Its 9 Principles of Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

What makes Google the holy grail of productivity and creativity? Take a look at their nine core principles of innovation.  


Excerpts:


1. INNOVATION COMES FROM ANYWHERE

...top down as well as bottom up, and in the places you least expect.


...a medical doctor on Google’s staff argued persuasively that Google had a moral obligation to extend help to those typing searches under the phrase "how to commit suicide." He ignited the charge to adjust the search engine's response so that the top of the screen reveals the toll free phone number for the National Suicide Prevention Hotline. The call volume went up by nine percent soon thereafter. The same change has been adopted in many other countries.


3. AIM TO BE TEN TIMES BETTER

..aim...to improve things by ten percent, you will only see incremental change. ...think 10 times improvement, and that will force you to think outside the box.


...n 2004, Google started its Google Books project and set forth a challenge to organize all the world's information and digitize all the books ever printed in history.


...Google has now scanned 30 million of the 130 million books they first set out to scan, and dozens of libraries around the world are participating in the project.


4. BET ON TECHNICAL INSIGHTS

Every organization has unique insights, and if you bet on it, it leads to major innovation. Google engineers, not the auto industry, came up with the idea of driverless cars after seeing that millions of traffic deaths come from human error.


The others?

2. FOCUS ON THE USER.


5. SHIP AND ITERATE


6. GIVE EMPLOYEES 20 PERCENT TIME


7. DEFAULT TO OPEN PROCESSES


8. FAIL WELL


9. HAVE A MISSION THAT MATTERS



Related posts by Deb:

     

Messing up a Change Implementation with Someone Else’s Learning Culture?

       

3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way


           

A Two Step, Two Video Dance towards Loose – Tight Change & Innovation Leadership

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This inspiring list can stimulate great discussions at all levels for what YOU want in your own culture, mission and vision and management practices.

One caution to note, culture change is not for amateurs.   Take a look at the article references I've listed above for some of the reasons why.

~  Deb 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:00 AM

From our Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?  curation news:  This list can inspire useful discussions at all levels for what YOU want in your own culture, mission and vision and management practices.

One caution, having a meeting on such a topic or deciding to change culture is not for amateurs.   Take a look at the article references I've listed above for some of the reasons why.

~  Deb 

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A Credit Card Regulation That Worked for Consumers & Banks Too

A Credit Card Regulation That Worked for Consumers & Banks Too | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Economists found that the Card Act, passed in 2009, saved consumers billions of dollars by cutting through a tangle of credit card fees.  ...and more."


Congress decided to force down the hidden fees that credit card companies collect from their customers. It passed a law called the 2009 Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act   ...It's a clear case of regulation that worked. 


____________________________

...the new law saved customers an annualized 2.8 percent of the average daily balance on cards - [$20.8 billion ...

____________________________



..the authors of the new study access to information on more than 150 million credit card accounts. They found that on average, the new law saved customers an annualized 2.8 percent of the average daily balance on cards - [a] $20.8 billion estimate.


…a surprising discovery made in the new paper: Subprime credit card holders do default more often than others, but the interest and fees they paid made them far more profitable for the banks than any other groups of credit card holders, even during the financial crisis.



“This was probably the worst period in modern history to be a lender...when banks were hemorrhaging money on subprime loans, subprime credit cards were a major source of profits.” With profits that high, banks could still do well even with lower fees.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Some good news:  a case study where the researchers, having low expectations that the legislation would tamp down the tendency of banks to find loopholes and raise consumer rates.  Actually, it worked, and benefitted the banks as well.   


It's cool when that type of innovation happens through, of all things, a regulation.   ~  D

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99 Quotes on The Future of Innovation

http://blogs.sap.com/innovation/ - Business Innovation is the key ingredient for growth.



Related post by Deb:
    

Beyond Resilience: Givers, Takers, Matchers and Anti-Fragile Systems

    

Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

From SAP, useful nuggets to consider trends and change, business design change.  ~  Deb

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David Hain's curator insight, October 19, 2013 2:52 AM

Some fascinating facts on the world we live in now and how it is predicted to change.

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10 Great Social Innovation Reads ~ Month by Month

10 Great Social Innovation Reads ~ Month by Month | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

A helpful, annotated list of Great Social Innovation reads including this gem, ...Peter Buffett, son of Warren ...wrote a pretty scathing rant against today’s philanthropy, calling it “conscience laundering — feeling better about accumulating more than any one person could possibly need to live on by sprinkling a little around as an act of charity.”


More excerpts from Neil's July 2013 list (the post includes lists from previous months):


Dan Cardinali, CEO of Communities in Schools and an emerging voice on the importance of measuring nonprofit outcomes, wrote a third piece in his series on redefining the nonprofit sector.


Bill Shore of Share Our Strength, offers the provocative “We Just Don’t Have the Money, and Other Fibs We Tell Ourselves“.


Antony Bugg-Levine from the Nonprofit Finance Fund provides ... “Navigating Tough Trade-offs in the Era of Scarcity.”


From Social Velocity

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Just reading these annotated book lists for social innovation is provocative and attractive to creativity an considerations in social innovation, including the "scathing rant" by Warren Buffett's son Peter mentioning “conscience laundering" and "sprinkling a little [wealth] around as an act of charity.”

~  Deb 

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