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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Cohabitation, academics & industry: Midwestern colleges launch Innovation campuses, public-private collaboration

Cohabitation, academics & industry: Midwestern colleges launch Innovation campuses, public-private collaboration | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"'Innovation campuses' are springing up everywhere" especially in the Midwest.

 

...the intentional cohabitation of academics and industry is key to all of them, something university leaders say made the ambitious and expensive projects palatable to legislators and voters even as the economy and higher ed appropriations shrunk.

 

Here's sampling of what is under contruction, via Inside Higher Ed:

 

...many [are] in the Midwest and almost all involving fancy new buildings and partnerships between public colleges and private corporations.

 

Public research universities have long had ties to state industries, and technology transfer is widespread in higher education.


The new innovation campuses include:


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP), Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Open Innovation & Organizational Boundaries, in Institutions, Will it Blend? — HBS Working Knowledge

Open Innovation & Organizational Boundaries, in Institutions, Will it Blend? — HBS Working Knowledge | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Open innovation, enabled by low-cost communication and the decreased costs of memory and computation, has transformed markets and social relations.


As the authors illustrate, it will be challenging to manage contrasting modes of innovation, and that is exactly what is needed in organizations that expect to innovate and are systemically, culturally, not set up to help this happen. 



Excerpts:

Open innovation, in contrast to firm-centered innovation, is radically decentralized, peer based, and includes intrinsic and pro-social motives.


The authors of this working paper use in-depth examples from Apple, NASA, and Lego to argue that open innovation will at least complement, if not increasingly substitute for, more traditional innovation modes.


This is within the contexts of increasing modularity and decreased communication costs.   (DN:  Just look at digital communication today.  Think ahead 4 months to 1 year of what's next.)


Emerging theories must be informed by these contrasting innovation modes and the implications for governance, incentives, intellectual property, managerial choice, professional and organizational identity, and organizational cultures.


Key concepts include:


  • Leaders and senior teams can take advantage of contrasting innovation modes, paradoxical organizational requirements, and associated dynamic boundaries.

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  • Leaders need to execute strategic choices with the systems, structures, incentives, cultures, and boundaries tailored to open and firm-based innovation modes.
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  • Multiple types of boundaries will increasingly be employed to manage innovation, from traditional to complex intra firm boundaries (such as ambidextrous designs), to webs of interdependence with partners and potentially anonymous communities.
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  • Senior teams must build their capabilities to deal with contradictions as well as their organization's ability to embrance contradictions.  


A link to the full working paper, downloadable by Assistant Professor, Karim R. Lakhani & colleague is here.


Source:  Karim R. Lakhani is an assistant professor in the Technology and Operations Management unit at Harvard Business School.  


This link was also recommended by Jeffrey DeGraff at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, and I also think it's right on, even if the language is quite academic.  It will make you think about your institutional systems, and refresh your vocabulary.    ~  Deb

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HR is ripe for social disruption. Innovating HR structure to support peer learning, innovative organizations

HR is ripe for social disruption.  Innovating HR structure to support peer learning, innovative organizations | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Is it finally time for Social HR? What's out there that uses social systems to revitalize how people are recruited and learn, grow and develop within organizations?


If organizations tend to be hidebound against change, Human Resources (HR) is even more so, in spite of the trendy strategic HR spin of the early 2000's . Consider HR's roots, which persist today: labor relations, compensation, employment/personnel and the number of lawyers on staff.


Here's some fresh thinking about embracing social as a new definer of HR systems from Gautam Ghosh.


Excerpted, adapted:


Recruitment:  HR has been quick to leverage social media to “Broadcast” vacancies. The next level would be actively creating and nurturing communities of practice shaped around skills where hiring managers can gauge level of skills of people and also develop them (Disclaimer: The author works with BraveNewTalent, a platform that helps organizations do that)


Knowledge Sharing: Forget the idea of databases acting as “repositories” of knowledge, internal social networks can capture employees work activity as social intranets  – and team members can follow what others are doing on their activity streams. Newer tools like Opzi and MindQuilt can also emerge as a enterprise version of Quora, the popular Q&A site.


HR policies: Using a social tool which leverages crowdsourcing ideas from employees can help HR in co-creating processes and policies – and raise acceptability when they are finally rolled out. Dell’s EmployeeStorm is a great example by which employees give ideas on everything in the company.


From the autho, Gautam Ghosh, a Product Evangelist and India Marketing Lead at BraveNewTalent specializing in the areas of HR, organization development and learning and employee engagement. He has worked as a HR Generalist and a Learning and Development Executive in firms like Deloitte, Dell, Hewlett Packard and Satyam Computer Services."

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