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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Compensation Bloat? University of Michigan faculty question administrator pay in open letter

Compensation Bloat?  University of Michigan faculty question administrator pay in open letter | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

An open letter to University of Michigan's Board of Regents from about a dozen of the school's faculty criticizes the school's administrative pay and bonus system. "The University is in desperate and urgent need of fiscal reform." 


____________________
   
The authors argue that U-M is not transparent about its pay supplements...some administrators received...in excess of $50,000.

     

____________________


The authors argue that U-M is not transparent about its pay supplements, and that they are an unwise use of money from the general fund. Data obtained by the professors show that some administrators received salary supplements in excess of $50,000.

  

...Anthony Mora, a history professor who helped author the letter, said that while it's reasonable executive officers have higher compensation that most staff, U-M's compensation rates for those officers are between 27 and 41 percent higher than the rates' of administrators at peer institutions such as Berkeley, Texas and Virginia, according to a review done by the faculty.
 

"We want to have an open and candid discussion about the university's resources," Mora said. "I don't see this as an effort to be adversarial with the administration. I think people in the administration are genuine when they say they care about the university. But I do think there's an opportunity here for the faculty and the administration to work together."

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The escalating costs of higher education may no longer be taken for granted with such moves as these from the core of  the university system, the faculty.

The article also referenced the initially poorly implemented, cost cutting administrative shared services initiative (labeled AST, Administrative Services Transformation)  that did not include the faculty voice in its cost cutting planning and involved the use of several consulting firms with expenses totalling over 11 million for consulting services.  As as consultant myself, I know consultant have reasons to charge a high rate, but leaving the faculty voice out of a change initiative mystifies me.


I look forward to hearing where this letter leads in dealing with, perhaps, some unquestioned compensation practices.   ~  Deb


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 25, 2014 4:05 PM

Several faculty have taken up the gauntlet to question escalating costs - starting with higher education administrative bonuses.  Executive bonuses may no longer be taken for granted with such moves as these, perhaps prompted by the poorly planned, cost cutting administrative shared services initiative (labeled AST, Administrative Services Transformation)  which, incidentally, did NOT include the faculty voice in its cost cutting planning.


It also involved the use of several consulting firms with expenses totalling over 11 million for consulting services.  As as consultant myself, I know consultant have reasons to charge a high rate, but leaving the faculty voice out of a change initiative mystifies me.


I look forward to hearing where this letter leads in dealing with, perhaps, some unquestioned compensation practices, and perhaps stepping higher education back to a bigger picture of where the value generation resides and how it needs to be valued today.   ~  Deb

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The Professors, Yes, the MOOC Hype is Worth It: Disruption in Higher Ed

The Professors, Yes, the MOOC Hype is Worth It:  Disruption in Higher Ed | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Professors were asked, do they believe MOOCs "are worth the hype." 79% said yes.


===


In the largest survey of instructors who have taught massive open online courses, The Chronicle heard from critics, converts, and the cautious.

 

Hype around these new free online courses has grown louder and louder since a few professors at Stanford University drew hundreds of thousands of students to online computer-science courses in 2011.


Since then MOOCs, which charge no tuition and are open to anybody with Internet access, have been touted by reformers as a way to transform higher education and expand college access.


Many professors teaching MOOCs had a similarly positive outlook: Asked whether they believe MOOCs "are worth the hype," 79 percent said yes.


Via Smithstorian, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 18, 2013 12:40 PM

There is some synchroncity here that this article is showing up while I'm listening to a professor at UM talk about Harvard choosing a MOOC for accounting for their entry level accounting (Brigham Young) and outsourcing professors.

Can paths to efficiency and worker health co-exist?

Professor:  Wally Hopp, Associate Dean for Faculty and Research Herrick Professor of Manufacturing, Ross School of Business   Positively Lean: A Path to Efficiency and Energization?


Examples:  Henry Ford, Joe at GM Powertrain, FelPro (300% ROI on Employee Benefits, no turnover > sold to Federal Mogul)


Key themes in the blend:

  • Share the gain
  • Appeal to pride
  • Cultivate a community
  • Pursue a higher purpose <motivation>  (Sugar water or change the world)

 

Apple >> Change the world

Patagonia  >> Corporate responsibility  (Don't buy what you don't need)
University of Michigan  Uncommon education for the common man  (President James Burrill Angell) 


Questions:

  • Is the key challenge aligning organization & employee benefits from efficiency gains?
  • Or is it cultivating a sense of higher purpose?
  • Or something completely different?    
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Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks

Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen literally wrote the book on technology disruption...and he thinks Apple, Tesla Motors, venture capitalists and most of the nation’s colleges and universities should be afraid."

  

The author of The Innovator’s Dilemma said Wednesday that all of them could be killed by less advanced competitors in the same way that many once dominant technology companies have been in the past.

  

...He believes that and the commoditization of smartphones threaten Apple in the long run.

  

...“For 300 years, higher education was not disruptable because there was no technological core."

  

“But now online learning brings to higher education this technological core, and people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.'

__________________

    

...people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.

__________________


...“there is a different business model that is disrupting this in addition to online learning. It’s on-the-job education. ...you come in for a week and we’ll teach you about strategy and you go off and develop a strategy.  


...You learn it and you use it. These are very different business models and that’s what’s killing us.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've posted this to BOTH Change Leader Watch & here.  On the Innovations & Institutions stream, I'll be adding examples of organizations that are adapting to this disruption in academe and the other industries mentioned.  ~  Deb

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Marie Jeffery's comment, February 11, 2013 11:13 AM
KMInstitute.org
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, February 17, 2013 4:30 PM
Thanks for your comments Marie. Knowledge Management is quite an industry, with various opinions of the traction it holds in business. I am most curious as to where it is headed.
Patrick J Scanlon's curator insight, March 12, 2013 5:58 PM

If you don't like change.  You will like irrelevance even less #media #higherEd #VC

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The 12 Masters of Innovation - Perspectives, Slideshare, Harvard Business Review

The 12 Masters of Innovation - Perspectives, Slideshare, Harvard Business Review | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Worth a good look on leadership in innovation.


Some of who are listed include these educators:


Steve Blank, a seasoned entrepreneur who lectures at Berkeley and Stanford

His most important innovation lesson:

  • A startup is a "temporary organization searching for a repeatable and scalable business model"—a structured search process maximizes your chances of success.
  • If you read one book, read: The Four Steps to the Epiphany (Cafepress.com, 2005)


Clayton Christensen, Harvard Business School professor and Innosight co-founder.
His most important innovation lesson:

  • Doing everything right can leave a successful organization susceptible to attack from a disruptive innovator who changes the game with a simple, accessible, or affordable solution.
  • If you read one book, read: The Innovator's Solution (with Michael Raynor; Harvard Business Review Press, 2003)


Peter Drucker, legendary management guru and long-time professor at the Claremont Graduate University
  • His most important innovation lesson: "The customer rarely buys what the company thinks it is selling him." Companies need to take a customer-first perspective to succeed with innovation.
  • If you read one book, read: Innovation and Entrepreneurship (originally published in 1985)



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RELENTLESS! Reinventing Higher Education, Southern New Hampshire University @SNHU via Fast Company

RELENTLESS!  Reinventing Higher Education,  Southern New Hampshire University @SNHU via Fast Company | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"As president of Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU), LeBlanc is ...using technology to transform an 80-year-old college into a modern education powerhouse."


I tweeted about @SNHU over a year ago, as I was intrigued they had an MBA in Social Media.  However, it led to a conversation with several people at the institution.  


After experiencing a considerable amount of the hidebound nature of the ivory tower of higher education, the experience I had with SNHU was a breath of fresh air, informed by data and, could it be, skilled process?


New England is the land of the ivies.   So much the better for @SNHU (their twitter handle) to leverage what they do as they think & implement differently.


Stay tuned, an interview may soon follow...


Excerpts:

Founded in 1932 as the New Hampshire School of Accounting and Secretarial Science, SNHU was a modest school when Le­Blanc joined as president in 2003, recognized for its culinary arts, business, and justice programs. Its online program was, as LeBlanc puts it, "a sleepy operation on a nondescript corner of the main campus. I thought it was squandering an opportunity."


That little operation has turned into SNHU’s Center for Online and Continuing Education (COCE), the largest online-degree provider in New England.


Its 10,600 students are enrolled in 120 graduate and undergraduate programs and specialties, everything from a sustainability-focused MBA to a creative-writing BA.


Fifty more programs will be launched this year, and the COCE recently tested TV ads in national markets such as Raleigh, North Carolina; Milwaukee; and Oklahoma City.


LeBlanc hopes that by 2014 SNHU will boast the country’s biggest online not-for-profit education system.

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Game-based Learning & Higher Education, Jane McGonigal & TED | Online Universities

Game-based Learning & Higher Education, Jane McGonigal & TED | Online Universities | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

McGonigal’s hypothesis for higher education is that, if we can create engaging and fun games based on meaningful real world problems, we have the ability to leverage an incredible amount of energy and passion to solve the world’s biggest problems.


Urgent Optimism, Social Fabric, Blissful productivity and Epic Meaning are the four tenets proposed by game designer Jane McGonigal in her TED talk.  


Game-based learning is beginning to happen in the public schools. The work of Katie Salen and her Quest2Learn school in NYC and the work of University of Wisconsin gaming researcher Kurt Squire are two notable examples of the power of gaming in education and the impact that it can have on learning.


However, educational institutions are notoriously slow to change. The good news is that they may not be able to hold back a wave of change that is about to crest. Gaming has become an increasingly important part of culture and its spread into public education means that students entering college in the next several years are going to have an expectation that gaming will be a part of the college curriculum.


If higher education does not adapt to meet this demand, it may find itself in even deeper trouble than it already is as potential students seek alternative paths to have their interests satisfied. If an initiative such as the MacArthur Foundation’s digital badges takes hold, game-based learning may become an acceptable, even accredited, alternative path to higher education.


If that happens, the dams will burst and the most significant changes in education since the Industrial Revolution will sweep away previous notions of what learning looked like.


Photo credit:  by annais, Flickr Creative Commons


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Times Higher Education - Innovation strategy 'ignores' funding and visa concerns

University strategies & policy:  Too little innovation?


Excerpt:  Wendy Piatt, director-general of the Russell Group of large research-intensive universities, welcomed many of the measures in the newly announced innovation strategy, but was disappointed it did not address concerns about postgraduate funding, or adopt the Russell Group's proposal for a new bank loan scheme for postgraduates.


She also called for more capital funding to be made available to universities, and for research to be exempted from the Freedom of Information Act.


David Price, vice-provost for research at University College London, praised the government for "the stability of its commitment to the research base" in difficult times.


He also said it was a pity the strategy's "fine words on the importance of mobile highly skilled people" had not translated into concessions regarding universities' continuing concerns about the government's new visa regulations.

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MOOCs, Blended Learning on Stage with Charlie Rose - Online Education

MOOCs, Blended Learning on Stage with Charlie Rose - Online Education | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"I will say the blended model, ...with certainty, is revolutionizing, higher education." "...access to a Master Teacher..."  ~ Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania


Charlie interviews:

  • Anant Agarwal, CEO of edX;
  • Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania;
  • Joel Klein, former New York City Schools chancellor and CEO of Amplify and
  • Tom Friedman of the New York 


Related posts by Deb:

  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

A blend of views discuss MOOCs and on-line education.  Note the access and pacing comments of Anant Agarwal from edX and what he's implying.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 26, 2013 2:22 PM

Pacing the learning, removing the exclusive, high expense of the classic 4 year degree, access to "Master Teachers," are some the the advantages.

An alternative view of higher education was forecast by a guest blogger on my own website who built his own degree at a much lower cost, listed above, "Right Sizing..."   ~ Deb

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6 Emerging Technologies in Higher Education

6 Emerging Technologies in Higher Education | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Six (6) emerging technologies are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years."


The work is by the NMC Horizon Project, a decade-long research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in higher education.


Trends included in the short list of major changes in higher education include:

  • Flipped Classroom, 
  • MOOCs, Mobile Apps, 
  • Tablet Computing, 
  • Augmented Reality, 
  • Game-Based Learning, 
  • The Internet of Things, 
  • Learning Analytics, 
  • 3D Printing, 
  • Flexible Displays, 
  • Next Generation Batteries, 
  • Wearable Technology.  


The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI), an EDUCAUSE Program.


Related posts by Deb via REVELN:


   



Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Academe is one of the biggest, most obvious targets of disruptive innovation, and on-the-job education is an aspect of it, via the previous post by Christensen.  Here's what Educause has to say about it.  See my Social, peer learning & curation stream to learn about "Peer Learning Circles."  ~  D

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Why Innovation Dies - A University Example of Structure Gone Bad - Forbes

Why Innovation Dies - A University Example of Structure Gone Bad - Forbes | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

The classic mistakes made in dealing with disruption are here:  a new administrative lead role (a dean),  policy teams, committees, and implementation plan.


"...the minute the memo started talking about a Policy Team developing detailed implementation plans, it was all over."


Have you been there?  How did it turn out for you?


...Any possibility for innovation dies when a company forms a committee for an “overarching strategy.”


This insightful article by Steve Blank, mirrors what's I've read about and seen time and time again in decisive actions taken by executives and in large institutions.


Excerpted:


Lessons Learned

  • Innovation in New Markets do not come from “overarching strategies”
  • It comes out of opportunity, chaos and rapid experimentation
  • Solutions are found by betting on a portfolio of low-cost experiments
  • The road for innovation does not go through committee

One useful purpose a university committee could have had was figuring out what the goal of going online was.  [The example in the article is education based.]


__________________________


...it is so complex that figuring out the one possible path to a correct solution is computationally incalculable.
__________________________


...the path to implementing online education is not known. In fact, it’s not a solvable problem by committee, regardless of how many smart people in the room. It is a “NP complete” problem – it is so complex that figuring out the one possible path to a correct solution is computationally incalculable.


By:  Steve Blank, author, teacher of entrepreneurship and consultant who has reshaped how startups are created. He is coauthor of the recently published, The Startup Owner’s Manual (K&S Ranch, 2012).

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Negative Innovation: Predatory For-Profit Colleges & GI Bill Money continues, new legislation pending

Negative Innovation:  Predatory For-Profit Colleges & GI Bill Money continues, new legislation pending | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Frontline's expose' (PBS, Frontline)  highlights predatory practices aimed at returning military veterans."  


Weakened legislation has been passed.  More robust legislation is pending, finally, aimed at curbing what sponsors call aggressive marketing of subpar, profit-motive programs.


The abuses include:

  • volume oriented higher-education program recruiting, 
  • inaccurate verbal statements from recruiters about transferable credits that conflict with binding legal documents, and 
  • political wangling about legislation to stop the abuses that, if weakened, can be highly profitable to the politically connected.  

That these for-profit higher education institutions have taken aim at returning war veterans is the most appalling.  Innovation doesn't come with morality guidelines.  That rests solely within leadership ethics.


Excerpt 1:  EXPOSÉ Online [The PBS] film ...Educating Sergeant Pantkze, features, how in recent years, for-profits have increased efforts to attract veterans after the passage of a robust new post-9/11 GI Bill in 2008.   Frontline has also covered for-profit practice in an earlier expose' in 2010, in a program entitled College.Inc.


Excerpt 2:  Predatory for-profit schools
Military columnist Tom Philpott, a former Coast Guardsman, has led the criticism of what he calls the “predatory for-profit schools” that “rob veterans of their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits.” He quotes Theodore (Ted) L. Daywalt, chief executive officer and president of VetJobs, an online job search firm for military veterans, as saying that he learned about the problem through working with disappointed vets who thought they had used their GI Bill to earn credible degrees only to learn they were “worthless.”


“The eighth for-profit company among the top 10 institutions getting GI Bill payments is Kaplan, owned by The Washington Post. Its Post-9/11 GI Bill payments climbed in 12 months from $17 million to $44 million,” noted Philpott. 


Source 2:  http://www.canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/43648

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Will they Pay? Degrees & UnBundling: Massive online courses not a game changing innovation > Competency building is

Will they Pay?  Degrees & UnBundling: Massive online courses not a game changing innovation > Competency building is | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Higher ed disrupters:  It may not be what it seems, Alice.   It's the unbundling and competency building that makes the difference.


As shared on this curation stream, with higher education seeming like one of the next bubbles to burst, due to high cost, ossified bureacracies and the like, there is more to the story.


The context, if you've missed it, is further below.   Meanwhile, here's a few other things to consider having to do with profitability, the value of a degree & unbundling - several key concepts for these changing times for higher education:


Excerpted:


If you build it, will they pay?

...when the chattering class meets Professor Thrun, it’s love at first sight. The notion that they might take a Stanford course for free recalls their youthful days at similar elite universities


...educational romantics already have degrees. And when Udacity begins charging even modest fees for its courses, Professor Thrun may find this group resistant to paying for lifelong learning.


"Degrees are definitely not disappearing; they’re not even in decline."

...in developing economies, where there is truly a hunger for knowledge in any form and where the degree may not yet be as central to the evaluation of prospective employees [like it is in the US], the wage premium from a bachelor’s degree is even higher [than the US]:

  • 124 percent in Mexico,
  • 171 percent in Brazil and
  • 200 percent in China,
  • compared with a mere 62 percent in the U.S.
.

Unbundling & Building Success in Competencies are the Innovation

Salman Khan's popular on-line Khan Academy videos teach a single concept.

  • Stanford Professor Thrun’s (reference below) online course builds on Khan’s innovation, and the resulting andragogy is remarkable.


Professor Thrun had to say in his announcement, excerpted:


We really set up our students for failure. We don’t help students to become smart.


Grades are the failure of the education system.  ...So rather than grading students, my task was to make students successful.


We changed the course so the questions were still hard, but students could attempt them multiple times. And when they finally got them right, they would get their A+. And it was much better.


Today, when someone fails, we don’t take time to make them a strong student. We give them a C or a D, move them to the next class. Then they’re branded a loser, and they’re set up for failure. This medium has the potential to change all that.


Context, excerpted:

The news media has been abuzz over two higher education developments:


1) MIT announces an extension of its successful OpenCourseWare initiative and that it will offer certificates to students who complete courses. MITx will allow students to access content for free. Students who wish to receive a certificate will be charged a modest fee for the requisite assessments,  issued under the name MIT.


2) Sebastian Thrun, an adjunct professor of computer science at Stanford who invited the world to attend his fall semester artificial intelligence course and who ended up with 160,000 online students, announced he had decided to stop teaching at Stanford and direct all his teaching activities through Udacity, a start-up he co-founded that will offer online courses from leading professors to millions of students.


He called the experience of reaching so many students life-changing: “Having done this, I can’t teach at Stanford again. I feel there’s a red pill and a blue pill. And you can take the blue pill and go back to your classroom and lecture your 20 students. But I’ve taken the red pill, and I’ve seen Wonderland.”


Read more via InsideHigherEd.com


Photo credit: DaBok, Flickr cc

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The Faculty Project offers Free Online Courses from Elite College Faculty | Inside Higher Ed

The Faculty Project offers Free Online Courses from Elite College Faculty | Inside Higher Ed | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Bricks and mortar institutions:  meet online disruptors in the academy.  Udemy is the next shoe dropping with its Faculty Project, online courses offered by professors at a number of top institutions.

 

This announcement comes right on the heels of news about a Stanford professor leaving his tenured job in order to reach bigger audiences that have flocked to his artificial intelligence course online.

 

Excerpt:

Udemy, a company that allows anyone to create and sell courses through its online platform, has announced a new area of its site, called The Faculty Project, devoted to courses by professors at a number of top institutions, such as Colgate, Duke University, Stanford University, Northwestern University, Vanderbilt University, the University of Virginia, Dartmouth College and Vassar College. While Udemy is a for-profit enterprise, the Faculty Project courses will be free.

 

The goal is to “elevate the brand,” according to Gagan Biyani, Udemy’s president and co-founder. The company says it has no immediate plans to monetize the Faculty Project, and would never do so without the input and permission of its faculty contributors.


Via Smithstorian, Keith Hampson PhD
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