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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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5 Ways to Bring Creativity Back to Your Culture

5 Ways to Bring Creativity Back to Your Culture | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
All too often, entrepreneurs build companies that stifle the very creativity they need. Here's how to get that creative spark back.


Excerpted:  Four changes (of five) you can make today to bring creativity back to your culture.

       

Offer Unlimited Vacation

Offering unlimited vacation won't make people skip work every Friday or leave people hanging at deadlines. Instead, it will give them control to choose when they decide to work and when they don't. Although this may seem trivial, being able to choose means everything in a creative culture.

   

Ditch the Meetings

The worst part about meetings is that they're incredibly easy to add. Even if you make an agenda, the number will only go up as you grow in size. As a result, little creative thinking will get done during the day.

    

Nix Department Goals

Department goals often help managers more than employees. Generally, you'll end up wasting valuable hours setting new goals and then even more time asking why you didn't hit them.
 

Worse still, each department relies on resources they don't control and departments they're not a part of to reach their goals. This can result in teams signing up for work they were unaware of, which can lead to arguments about whose goals are more important.

      

Give Plenty of Feedback

...A lot of companies make feedback a formal process, waiting until the end of the month, quarter, or year to share how they actually feel.


Creative cultures thrive on timely, spontaneous feedback. Whether it's good or bad, feedback helps teams raise their own expectations. It's the fuel you need to ignite a creative culture. And who doesn't want one of those?

     

Read more here.



Related tools & posts by Deb:

     

  • Don't miss a thing by subscribing to Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE curation streams @Deb Nystrom, REVELN, featuring three gold award change-themed streams, shared once a month via email,  free here,via REVELN Tools.

     

    

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I left off his "Let Employees Work Remotely" not because I don't believe it helps, it's just that it has been challenged because of the need to interact with others, examine blind spots, and building a culture does involve a certain amount of showing up.

~  Deb 

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Industries Not Worth Saving - U.S. Whaling: An Innovation Story for Today, The Atlantic

Industries Not Worth Saving - U.S. Whaling: An Innovation Story for Today, The Atlantic | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"An extinct business offers surprisingly current lessons about the triumph of technology, the future of work, and the inevitable decline of industries that might not be worth saving."


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...the vessel's technology had become so easy to maneuver, even an unwashed cannibal could use it.

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In context, consider the companion predatory for-profit higher education news - taking advantage of the GI bill for returning vets and producing, for some vets, what turns out to a worthless degree, with considerable debt, and slim job prospects.


Excerpts: 


BLUBBER!    Fat had never made a city so flush.

In the mid-nineteenth century, New Bedford, Mass., was the center of the whaling universe and the richest city per capita in the United States -- if not in the world, according to one 1854 American newspaper. The US whaling industry grew by a factor of fourteen between 1816 and 1850.


Innovations in winch technology made it easier to pull in or let out large sails, reducing the number of skilled workers needed to man a vessel.


...Winch tinkerings practically made the book Moby Dick possible. Melville could realistically populate his book with shady, far-flung, ragtag characters precisely because the vessel's technology had become so easy to maneuver, even an unwashed cannibal could use it.


Other featured innovations:

  • Americans sailed bigger and better ships, guided by smarter ocean cartography and more precise charts.
  • ...whale captains were innovators in employee compensation. 
  • ...tinkerings with harpoon technology led to the invention of the iron toggle harpoon, an icon of 19th-century whaling.


Decline wasn't in the rise of the oil/petroleum economy, it was:

  • US workers got too darn expensive, and other countries stole our share of the whale business.
  • Between the 1860s and the 1880s the wages of average US workers grew by a third, making us three times more expensive than your typical Norwegian seaman.
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Innovation, USAID and Smart Partnerships & Investments in Developing Countries

Innovation, USAID and Smart Partnerships & Investments in Developing Countries | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Companies are moving from corporate social responsibility to seeing these partnerships as Profit and Loss investments, with a huge potential for business growth.


Maura O'Neill, is the Chief Innovation Officer and Senior Counselor to the Administrator at the US Agency for International Development (USAID).  She highlights several ways that USAID fosters international innovation & development in poorer countries, in a way that all can benefit.


Maura O’Neill:


USAID pioneered innovations in development including:

  • the green revolution and oral rehydration therapy, saving millions of lives globally
  • pioneering mobile money in Afghanistan and Haiti, enabling their citizens to use their phones to send and receive money, purchase goods, pay bills, or run businesses helping transform their national economies
Trends:
  • Smart partnerships are emerging between companies, governments, and philanthropists with a huge potential for business growth in the developing world
  • companies have moved from corporate social responsibility to increasingly seeing these partnerships as Profit and Loss investments.

Sustainability:

  • Partnering  “mashes up” USAID deep development expertise with the private sector to help make development strides permanent. 
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P&G Success Formula > Culture: Improving Lives Through Innovation

P&G Success Formula > Culture: Improving Lives Through Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

McDonald Outlines P&G Success Formula: Improving Lives Through Innovation...

 

Saying Procter and Gamble’s unrelenting focus on innovation is “at the heart of everything we do,” P&G Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer Bob McDonald recently talked about the company’s keys to success during fiscal year 2011 in spite of the tough global economic conditions, presented at the company’s annual Shareholder’s Meeting in Cincinnati.


“Innovation is the primary way we fulfill our Purpose,” he said. “It’s the driving force behind our strategy, as it always has been at P&G.

 

>>>  Our experience has proven that promotions may win a quarter here and there, but innovation wins decades.”


As he addressed the shareholders in attendance, Bob said the company entered Fiscal 2011 with three clear objectives:


=> Execute the company’s purpose-inspired growth strategy;
=>Grow market share by growing organic sales one to two percentage points ahead of underlying market growth rates; and
=>Grow core earnings per share in the range of 7% to 9%.

 

And, in spite of significant business and economic challenges, Bob said the company managed to meet or exceed goals for each of the objectives.

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