Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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The World's Top 50 Most Innovative Companies 2014

The World's Top 50 Most Innovative Companies 2014 | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

There's another kind of faith in business: the belief that a product or service can radically remake an industry, change consumer habits, challenge economic assumptions. Proof for such innovative leaps is thin....Yet breakthrough progress often requires wide-eyed hope.

From the list of 50:

1) GOOGLE
FOR BECOMING A $350 BILLION GIANT THAT LETS LOOSE ALMOST TOO MANY INNOVATIONS AND MILESTONES TO COUNT.


2) BLOOMBERG PHILANTHROPIES
For doing good, methodically, using data to answer questions other foundations aren't asking


3) XIAOMI
FOR REINVENTING THE SMARTPHONE BUSINESS MODEL IN THE WORLD'S LARGEST MOBILE MARKET.


7) NIKE
For setting a sustainable example.


9) DONORSCHOOSE.ORG
FOR SETTING ITS SIGHTS ON EDUCATION REFORM,…avoiding unions and politicos by crowdsourcing direct assistance to teachers. 


11) DODGE
For being a part of the conversation, no matter what.


15) MICHAEL KORS
FOR WINNING TWO FASHION RACES AT ONCE


See the 50 companies, the full list here.


Related tools & posts by Deb:


     

      

 

Photo via Fast Company- featuring DonorsChoose.org
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Fast company has a mix of what defines innovative companies that mixes old and new, connected to adaptability and flexibility.  

See the companion article on the 12 rising innovation qualities spotted in this 2014 list of companies as well as a comment comparing innovative company ranking methods to Forbes.
 ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 11, 2014 9:19 AM

The top innovative companies have leaders who know how to sense and respond, as well as adapt.  ~  D

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Global Innovation Challenge: 160 Yr. Old Parent Challenges Freudenberg North America to Target Zero Manufacturing Waste

Global Innovation Challenge:  160 Yr. Old Parent Challenges Freudenberg North America to Target Zero Manufacturing Waste | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Freudenberg's North America companies are targeting zero manufacturing waste in response to a challenge set by parent corporation, Freudenberg and Co., during a recent internal Global Innovation Forum on raw materials and innovation."


Going green in the North America continues to be an important business goals for companies, including the long time global veteran, Freudenberg and Company.


Excerpt:


____________________________


Freudenberg has a 160-year history of conducting its business with integrity and a commitment to the welfare of its plant communities.

____________________________


In an ambitious drive to reach zero manufacturing waste ...Freudenberg North America's 16 companies will pursue processes that focus on ...recycling, lower water and energy consumption and increased use of sustainable materials over the next decade.


"All of the companies are engaged in implementing processes and programs that will improve the environmental sustainability of their products and plants," said Leesa Smith, president, Freudenberg North America Limited Partnership.


"The confluence of new environmental challenges and this long-standing corporate culture is pushing our people to develop green industrial innovations that will help solidify our success - and the health of our communities - into the next century."


Freudenberg-NOK Sealing Technologies, in Plymouth, Mich., is pursuing dozens of technological innovations aimed at reducing the company's reliance on scare natural resources, lowering vehicle emissions, improving engine and transmission performance, supporting development of wind and solar energy and incorporating more recycled content in its products.


Some examples from the Plymouth company:


  • Low Emission Sealing Solutions (LESS) components use one quarter of the energy a conventional radial shaft seal uses, thereby reducing fuel consumption and lowering vehicle emissions.


  • FluoroXprene® fluoroelastomers are a unique group of newly-developed materials that bridge the technology gap between PTFE and rubber while substantially reducing CO2 emissions and energy usage. FluoroXprene materials are completely recyclable. 
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  • The company is also pursuing ultraviolet (UV)-curable sealants that will reduce energy consumption, lower Co2 emissions and reduce cycle times.


Read the full press release story here.

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3 snapshots of Chinese innovation: GM, Semiconductors, AstraZeneca | McKinsey

3 snapshots of Chinese innovation: GM, Semiconductors, AstraZeneca | McKinsey | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Chinese innovation is evolving in diverse ways and at an uneven pace across a range of different industries.


1) GM China president Kevin Wale explains the importance of team-based innovation efforts in China and describes GM’s rapidly growing Advanced Technical Center in Shanghai. He also observes that innovation in China’s auto industry is more about commercialization models than technical achievements.


What China does better than any place else in the world is to innovate by commercialization, as opposed to constant research and perfecting the theory, like the West.


When the Chinese get an idea, they test it in the marketplace. They’re happy to do three to four rounds of commercialization to get an idea right, whereas in the West companies spend the same amount of time on research, testing, and validation before trying to take products to market.


2) The semiconductor industry is a powerful example of the tension surrounding China’s potential for innovation.  For two decades they have sought to create a more potent domestic semiconductor industry—with mixed results.


3) AstraZeneca's R&D focuses on unique disease mechanisms in China.  Certain diseases have high prevalence and, in many cases, could have different populations or different disease etiologies, presenting a white space on which R&D innovation can focus.

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Social Entrepreneurs, World Examples of Social Innovation & Change | World Economic Forum

Social Entrepreneurs, World Examples of Social Innovation & Change | World Economic Forum | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

As different as their fields of engagement may be, they all share their commitment for social change and social innovation.



  • Victoria is from Tanzania. She founded SELFINA, realizing a micro-leasing arrangements to increase incomes of self-employed women.
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  • Norbert from Germany, runs IQ consult: an agency for social innovation that offers training, coaching, micro-financing and mentoring for disadvantaged groups to increase employment.
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  • 1001 fontaines, started by Chay, offers a simple, durable, and low-cost solution to supply drinking water in small communities in developing countries.

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Victoria Kisyombe, Norbert Kunz and Lo Chay (from left to right) are three persons from three continents with three different stories.


They, along with around 30 other participants from 20 countries, gathered at the INSEAD Social Entrepreneurship Program in Singapore from the 28th of November till the 2nd of December 2012.

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MOOCs, Blended Learning on Stage with Charlie Rose - Online Education

MOOCs, Blended Learning on Stage with Charlie Rose - Online Education | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"I will say the blended model, ...with certainty, is revolutionizing, higher education." "...access to a Master Teacher..."  ~ Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania


Charlie interviews:

  • Anant Agarwal, CEO of edX;
  • Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania;
  • Joel Klein, former New York City Schools chancellor and CEO of Amplify and
  • Tom Friedman of the New York 


Related posts by Deb:

  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

A blend of views discuss MOOCs and on-line education.  Note the access and pacing comments of Anant Agarwal from edX and what he's implying.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 26, 2013 2:22 PM

Pacing the learning, removing the exclusive, high expense of the classic 4 year degree, access to "Master Teachers," are some the the advantages.

An alternative view of higher education was forecast by a guest blogger on my own website who built his own degree at a much lower cost, listed above, "Right Sizing..."   ~ Deb

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Industries Not Worth Saving - U.S. Whaling: An Innovation Story for Today, The Atlantic

Industries Not Worth Saving - U.S. Whaling: An Innovation Story for Today, The Atlantic | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"An extinct business offers surprisingly current lessons about the triumph of technology, the future of work, and the inevitable decline of industries that might not be worth saving."


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...the vessel's technology had become so easy to maneuver, even an unwashed cannibal could use it.

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In context, consider the companion predatory for-profit higher education news - taking advantage of the GI bill for returning vets and producing, for some vets, what turns out to a worthless degree, with considerable debt, and slim job prospects.


Excerpts: 


BLUBBER!    Fat had never made a city so flush.

In the mid-nineteenth century, New Bedford, Mass., was the center of the whaling universe and the richest city per capita in the United States -- if not in the world, according to one 1854 American newspaper. The US whaling industry grew by a factor of fourteen between 1816 and 1850.


Innovations in winch technology made it easier to pull in or let out large sails, reducing the number of skilled workers needed to man a vessel.


...Winch tinkerings practically made the book Moby Dick possible. Melville could realistically populate his book with shady, far-flung, ragtag characters precisely because the vessel's technology had become so easy to maneuver, even an unwashed cannibal could use it.


Other featured innovations:

  • Americans sailed bigger and better ships, guided by smarter ocean cartography and more precise charts.
  • ...whale captains were innovators in employee compensation. 
  • ...tinkerings with harpoon technology led to the invention of the iron toggle harpoon, an icon of 19th-century whaling.


Decline wasn't in the rise of the oil/petroleum economy, it was:

  • US workers got too darn expensive, and other countries stole our share of the whale business.
  • Between the 1860s and the 1880s the wages of average US workers grew by a third, making us three times more expensive than your typical Norwegian seaman.
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The world's most creative cities > Does it translate to Innovation?

The world's most creative cities > Does it translate to Innovation? | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Tel Aviv, London, Sydney, Stockholm and Shanghai are booming with talent.


Because creativity is cultural.  [And so} the Martin Prosperity Institute at U of T’s Rotman School of Management has been studying the complex web of factors that encourage and sustain innovation in regions around the world.


The institute’s Global Creativity Index, first published in 2004,  measures a nation’s innovation potential, focusing on what it calls the Three Ts: technology, talent and tolerance.


"The GCI is really trying to help regions understand where they are," explains Kevin Stolarick, research director of the Martin Prosperity Institute. "Even when times are good, you have to worry about what comes next."


These  five cities —and some of their start-ups—are on the docket for having very bright futures.


Via Karen Steffensen
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