Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Negative Innovation: Predatory For-Profit Colleges & GI Bill Money continues, new legislation pending

Negative Innovation:  Predatory For-Profit Colleges & GI Bill Money continues, new legislation pending | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Frontline's expose' (PBS, Frontline)  highlights predatory practices aimed at returning military veterans."  


Weakened legislation has been passed.  More robust legislation is pending, finally, aimed at curbing what sponsors call aggressive marketing of subpar, profit-motive programs.


The abuses include:

  • volume oriented higher-education program recruiting, 
  • inaccurate verbal statements from recruiters about transferable credits that conflict with binding legal documents, and 
  • political wangling about legislation to stop the abuses that, if weakened, can be highly profitable to the politically connected.  

That these for-profit higher education institutions have taken aim at returning war veterans is the most appalling.  Innovation doesn't come with morality guidelines.  That rests solely within leadership ethics.


Excerpt 1:  EXPOSÉ Online [The PBS] film ...Educating Sergeant Pantkze, features, how in recent years, for-profits have increased efforts to attract veterans after the passage of a robust new post-9/11 GI Bill in 2008.   Frontline has also covered for-profit practice in an earlier expose' in 2010, in a program entitled College.Inc.


Excerpt 2:  Predatory for-profit schools
Military columnist Tom Philpott, a former Coast Guardsman, has led the criticism of what he calls the “predatory for-profit schools” that “rob veterans of their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits.” He quotes Theodore (Ted) L. Daywalt, chief executive officer and president of VetJobs, an online job search firm for military veterans, as saying that he learned about the problem through working with disappointed vets who thought they had used their GI Bill to earn credible degrees only to learn they were “worthless.”


“The eighth for-profit company among the top 10 institutions getting GI Bill payments is Kaplan, owned by The Washington Post. Its Post-9/11 GI Bill payments climbed in 12 months from $17 million to $44 million,” noted Philpott. 


Source 2:  http://www.canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/43648

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Growth Limits: 'Paradigm-shifting innovation is what we need' - Hindu Business Line

Growth Limits: 'Paradigm-shifting innovation is what we need' - Hindu Business Line | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Growth is going to come only through innovation, focusing on poor countries. In the current environment you can grow aggressively only by inventing and innovating.


Prof. Vijay Govindarajan is widely regarded as one of the world's leading experts on strategy and innovation.


Excerpts:


The innovation agenda, people are also realising, has to be in poor countries. Because, ...the world's overall population of about seven billion now, there are three billion who are rich enough for the products which have already been invented.


But the four billion poor, who are non-consumers of just about everything, have to be brought into the consuming base.


...Reverse innovation first requires that you innovate in the poor country. That is step one.


Step two is to take it to other emerging markets. Step three is to bring it to the US or other rich countries. Most companies haven't even reached step one. That itself is a big one because American companies still think of India as poor and ‘therefore they want cheap products'.


They have to change that mindset; they are coming from a different mindset of innovations. They have to first think about changing the innovation paradigm itself and then about how to take it to other countries.


Two important traps Indian companies should absolutely avoid. The first trap is to ‘dumb-down' the technology and make something cheap. No. That is not what people want. People want technology-rich products, but also at the right price.


The Apple Nano is one example.


Keywords: Prof Vijay Govindarajan, Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth, American multinationals, product innovations, dumb-down technology, Flexibility, credibility

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