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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Where innovation is happening beyond the stuff of small start-ups & tech companies. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation and careers, SUBSCRIBE to REVELN.com/Tools/
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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from startups, lean and innovation
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Steve Blank's Lean Startup Model: Not Just For Startups, Rather For Surviving & Thriving in ANY Business

Steve Blank's Lean Startup Model: Not Just For Startups, Rather For Surviving & Thriving in ANY Business | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

The principles of the lean startup pose big challenge to corporate behemoths – but Steve Blank argues that they are now “essential for the survival of business.”

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  • Don't miss a thing by subscribing to Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE curation streams @Deb Nystrom, REVELN, featuring three gold award change-themed streams, shared once a month via email,  free here,via REVELN Tools.

     

    

 


Via joostallard
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a challenge to how business is done.  This is not your dad's company strategy, or even the Fortune 50's strategy from last year.    It is predicted the Fortune 500 will swap itself out with new business within a decade.  It IS time to rethink which business principles you will follow. ~ D

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Change Leadership Watch
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The innovation mind behind Tesla, SpaceX, SolarCity: Elon Musk

Entrepreneur Elon Musk is a man with many plans. The founder of PayPal, Tesla Motors and SpaceX sits down with TED curator Chris Anderson to share details about what's next.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Shared from my Change Leadership Watch as a companion to another innovation post about Elon Musk on this stream.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 21, 2013 10:56 PM

A TED talk that has made it to the list, "15 TED Talks That Will Change Your Life," belongs on this stream, and goes with a previous post here a few days ago.  ~  Deb

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7 Steps to a Culture of Innovation | Josh Linkner, Michigan Success Story

7 Steps to a Culture of Innovation | Josh Linkner, Michigan Success Story | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Most companies fail to unleash their most valuable resources: human creativity, imagination, and original thinking. They lack a systematic approach to building a culture of innovation, and then wonder why they keep getting beaten to the punch."


Josh speaks from tested experience.  His 7 steps include:


1. Fuel Passion

2. Celebrate Ideas

3. Foster Autonomy

4. Encourage Courage


Josh Linkner is a five-time entrepreneur, venture capitalist, professor, and The New York Times best-selling author of Disciplined Dreaming – A Proven System to Drive Breakthrough Creativity. You can read more about him at www.JoshLinkner.com.

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Universities should be innovative, academic says

Universities should be innovative, academic says | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
‘Meeting the needs of society is crucial'...

"Universities have to work and stitch around the community's needs. Otherwise we will continue to be seen as ivory towers."

Research incubators
Universities also have to move from the realm of research to commercial business opportunities, said Gabriel, and this means taking ideas beyond the laboratory.

Ways to do this include technology transfer offices and seeking funding to build research incubators but these activities need to have the end user in mind.

Gabriel said Abu Dhabi and the UAE, which has seen new institutions and companies established, are in a position to do things and think about who benefits from teaching and research.

According to Gabriel, universities can achieve economic success by having:

* Specialisation and differentiation — recognising true institutional excellence
Focused graduate programme expansions that feed into priority areas

* New approach to faculty contract length and compensation to attract and retain top-notch researchers and scientists

* Incorporate intellectual property approaches that maximise economic benefit and encourage entrepreneurs.
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Innovation and Effectuation. Are they siblings? | LinkedIn & Reveln

Innovation and Effectuation.  Are they siblings? | LinkedIn & Reveln | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Know thyself: Saras D. Sarasvathy, Darden School of Business, University of Virginia

Additionally, you are only going to invest what you can afford to lose - no more.

 

I'm very curious about Effetuation as a focus of a newly opened LinkedIn group because:

 

1) Effectuation popped up in my curation screen, including this new open LinkedIn group,

 

2) that "good fit" as described in this curation post is another angle to Effectuation that is news to me, and fits work that many of us do with leadership teams and leader development, and

 

3) Innovation and Effectuation, if not married, seem to at least be relatives in the same close family.

 

I'll post more about Effectuation in this ScoopIt curation stream as it connects to institutions and innovation as I'm able to see & share the linkages.   In the next few days, I have a new LinkedIn group to check out.

 

 ~ Deb (Reveln Consulting)

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5 Ways to Bring Creativity Back to Your Culture

5 Ways to Bring Creativity Back to Your Culture | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
All too often, entrepreneurs build companies that stifle the very creativity they need. Here's how to get that creative spark back.


Excerpted:  Four changes (of five) you can make today to bring creativity back to your culture.

       

Offer Unlimited Vacation

Offering unlimited vacation won't make people skip work every Friday or leave people hanging at deadlines. Instead, it will give them control to choose when they decide to work and when they don't. Although this may seem trivial, being able to choose means everything in a creative culture.

   

Ditch the Meetings

The worst part about meetings is that they're incredibly easy to add. Even if you make an agenda, the number will only go up as you grow in size. As a result, little creative thinking will get done during the day.

    

Nix Department Goals

Department goals often help managers more than employees. Generally, you'll end up wasting valuable hours setting new goals and then even more time asking why you didn't hit them.
 

Worse still, each department relies on resources they don't control and departments they're not a part of to reach their goals. This can result in teams signing up for work they were unaware of, which can lead to arguments about whose goals are more important.

      

Give Plenty of Feedback

...A lot of companies make feedback a formal process, waiting until the end of the month, quarter, or year to share how they actually feel.


Creative cultures thrive on timely, spontaneous feedback. Whether it's good or bad, feedback helps teams raise their own expectations. It's the fuel you need to ignite a creative culture. And who doesn't want one of those?

     

Read more here.



Related tools & posts by Deb:

     

  • Don't miss a thing by subscribing to Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE curation streams @Deb Nystrom, REVELN, featuring three gold award change-themed streams, shared once a month via email,  free here,via REVELN Tools.

     

    

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I left off his "Let Employees Work Remotely" not because I don't believe it helps, it's just that it has been challenged because of the need to interact with others, examine blind spots, and building a culture does involve a certain amount of showing up.

~  Deb 

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Beware the Entrepreneur's Recoil, Toxic to Innovation

Beware the Entrepreneur's Recoil, Toxic to Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"When we pull back, stop innovating ourselves and rebuff innovation and creativity from employees, we create an idea-killer emotional virus that destroys the very culture that got us where we are. "


Great piece on dealing with the cycles of innovation, success, risk.  Entrepreneurs get to be SO good at dealing with barriers, problems, set-backs and failures that success itself becomes another hurdle to overcome.


Excerpted, Jonathan Fields:


One of the biggest misses in the entrepreneurial process and mind is the assumption that mindset and willingness to embrace risk and creativity are fixed traits. In fact, the more successful most people become, the more they abandon the very mindset that fueled their success.


I call this the Entrepreneur’s Recoil.


So when you start a business, you adopt a do or die, all-in mindset. You come up with and are open to crazy ideas in the name of creating breakout businesses. And you’re willing to act on them. Because, beyond ego, even if you fail, the fall really won’t cause that much pain.


But, then something happens. You succeed.


Your mindset begins to shift into what famed psychologist and winner of the Nobel Prize for behavioral psychology, Daniel Kahneman, calls loss aversion mode.


1)  Rather than being driven by what you can build, create and have, you are overwhelmed by a fear of losing what you’ve already amassed.


2) Loss avoidance cultivates a strong negative creativity bias that makes us say no to innovative ideas.


When we pull back, stop innovating ourselves and rebuff innovation and creativity from employees, we create an idea-killer emotional virus that destroys the very culture that got us where we are. It breeds loss-aversion, fear and scarcity, which is death to innovation and expansion.


So...

Take a step backand ask a big question -
“Am I operating from a place of creative opportunity or loss aversion?”


Photo credit:  sean dreilinger, Flickr

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Social Entrepreneurs, World Examples of Social Innovation & Change | World Economic Forum

Social Entrepreneurs, World Examples of Social Innovation & Change | World Economic Forum | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

As different as their fields of engagement may be, they all share their commitment for social change and social innovation.



  • Victoria is from Tanzania. She founded SELFINA, realizing a micro-leasing arrangements to increase incomes of self-employed women.
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  • Norbert from Germany, runs IQ consult: an agency for social innovation that offers training, coaching, micro-financing and mentoring for disadvantaged groups to increase employment.
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  • 1001 fontaines, started by Chay, offers a simple, durable, and low-cost solution to supply drinking water in small communities in developing countries.

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Victoria Kisyombe, Norbert Kunz and Lo Chay (from left to right) are three persons from three continents with three different stories.


They, along with around 30 other participants from 20 countries, gathered at the INSEAD Social Entrepreneurship Program in Singapore from the 28th of November till the 2nd of December 2012.

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What Managers can learn from Entrepreneurs, Principles of Corporate Effectuation, Video

What managers can learn from expert entrepreneurs.   Corporate effectuation offers managers the possibility to be entrepreneurial in a corporate setting and still be in control.

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Where is Your Anchor for Innovation? Be a Leader Not a Hero | Forbes

Where is Your Anchor for Innovation? Be a Leader Not a Hero | Forbes | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

“Managers want authority,” says Seth Godin, author, keynoter and entrepreneur.  “Leaders take responsibility.”

 

In entrepreneurship the comparison isn’t between managers and leaders. It is between leaders and heroes.

 

In the six years that I’ve been following, studying and supporting entrepreneurs, I’ve found that none are interested in being managers. That is counterintuitive to their innate passion and impatience to innovate.

 

...depending on where that passion and impatience to innovate is anchored, entrepreneurs can either be leaders or heroes.

 

Those that chose to become leaders are confidently tied to a vision, knowing, as Godin points out, “where they’d like to go” and understanding that “they can’t get there without their tribe.”

 

Those that are heroes, however, are caught up in the ego, convinced that without them no success can be achieved.

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