Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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The Tipping Point between Structure & Innovation

The Tipping Point between Structure & Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Somewhere between the two extremes exists a tipping point – a place where full creativity and the lack of structure reaches a balance with purposeful, valuable and necessary structures and processes."


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Balancing structure and freedom, processes and creativity is an art, not a science.  ____________________

Move much more toward additional structure and you begin to limit and stifle creativity and innovation outcomes. 


Move much more toward freedom and creativity and you lose the ability to manage, develop and commercialize ideas. Where does the tipping point reside?


Your innovation activities need enough structure to identify and commercialize great ideas effectively, but not so much structure that people are stymied or slowed by processes, forms and decisions. 


In organizations where purposeful innovation is fairly new, the tipping point is closer to the regimented side, since there are few widely distributed capabilities or tools. As an organization gains experience innovating, the structure and rigidity become less important, as innate skills and culture learn to shape and manage ideas more effectively.


Related posts by Deb:



   
Photo:  by lambdachialpha Flickr CC
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's the art of deciding how to get the balance right: SO MANY businesses along with newbie or ill-informed managers stifle creativity, resulting in rampant mediocrity, morale problems and talent loss. Turn it around from victim, persecutor roles to encourager, challenger, collaborator, coach of your innovators.  ~  D

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The 2011 Global Innovation 1000: Why Culture is Key to Performance

The 2011 Global Innovation 1000: Why Culture is Key to Performance | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Certain companies succeed in producing innovative new products and services, and in so doing generate superior financial results.

Our 7th annual Global Innovation 1000 study has consistently demonstrated that the success of these companies is not a matter of how much these companies spend on research and development, but rather how they spend it.

This year, we took under consideration two particular qualities — strategic alignment and a culture that supports innovation — that truly innovative companies have put in place that allow them to outperform the competition.
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The Strategic Value of Unrealistic Goals - Accounting meets Vision & Innovation

The Strategic Value of Unrealistic Goals - Accounting meets Vision & Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"'Strategic intent" lets companies make big, bold bets, regardless of resources.'"

   

The author, Vijay Govindarajan, went from professor of accounting to a new role as researcher on strategy and innovation, based on an article "Strategic Intent" by Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad's circa 1989.

    

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Strategic intent takes the long view - to operate from the future backward, disregarding the resource scarcity of the present.

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His point is huge for innovation to succeed:  

   

  • Strategic intent takes the long view -  to operate from the future backward, disregarding the resource scarcity of the present.
   

Excerpts:

   
There are two views on strategy. The conventional view is that the firm should assess its resources and match resources with opportunities.

   

  • If Canon had followed that advice in the early 1970s, it would have never taken on Xerox. 
   

Hamel and Prahalad have an entirely different point of view. According to them, the firm should expand its resource base to meet its ambition.

   

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...[a] firm should expand its resource base to meet its ambition

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...In accounting, we always argued that "realistic" goals are the best, since they are achievable and as such are better motivators. I've even contributed to this literature on goal setting.

   

But according to Prahalad and Hamel, firms should set unrealistic goals, not realistic goals.

    

...the more I reflected on the article, the more it made sense. Realistic goals promote incremental moves; only unrealistic goals provoke breakthrough thinking.

   

JFK's audacious goal in the early 1960s when the U.S. fell behind the Soviet Union in the technology race: "this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth."

   

  • JFK's intent produced many breakthrough technologies.

   

In a similar way, "Strategic Intent" inspired me to think about mountains and not molehills as I shaped my research agenda around breakthrough innovation.

   

Read the full article here:

   

From Deb, a companion article on Strategic Agility is here.   Regarding resources, note:

   

  • Resource Fluidity: the internal capability to reconfigure business systems and redeploy resources rapidly,
   
  • Collective Commitment e.g. Leadership Unity: the ability of the top team to make bold decisions –fast, without being bogged in “win-lose” politics at the top.

Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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