Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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The Myth of Crowdfunding (or The Crowdfunding Hydra)

The Myth of Crowdfunding (or The Crowdfunding Hydra) | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Judy offers an experienced note of caution against over reliance on any single element in such a critical area of your organization’s mission as its fundraising. After all, quite often if your fundraising fails, so does your mission.Sometimes it can feel like any problem we face today can be ‘solved’ by throwing the internet at it.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Judy identifies aspects of the "bright and shiny object" effect of crowd-(insert the blank) - sourcing, funding, guessing, contributing, conversing.  Like the beasts in cave-paintings of old, the first blog posts, one can be nourished or devoured by the such objects of our attention.  ~  Deb

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Why Steve Jobs Never Listened to His Customers - Sheltered Innovation and Crowdsourcing

Why Steve Jobs Never Listened to His Customers  - Sheltered Innovation and Crowdsourcing | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Does innovation require listening to your customers? Or is to better to ignore them?  "It's really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times, people don't know what they want until you show it to them."— Steve Jobs    Also:  What worked for Steve Jobs may not work for your company.

    

The Benefits of Sheltered Innovation


Multiple studies have shown that individuals have a tendency to produce the most novel ideas when working alone (as opposed to crowdsourcing ideas from an external group).


  • But can this focus on the internal creativity of teams really have a place in the business world?

  • Should customers be ignored?


According to Mario D’Amico, senior VP of marketing at Cirque du Soleil, the answer is, well, maybe.


...was Jobs right or not?

Many respected entrepreneurs would say that yes, he was right ... but only for theextremely unconventional and circumstantial situation that his company was in.


...understanding your customers’ wants is a pivotal part of growing your business—but doesn’t have to restrict your innovation.


Read more:   https://www.helpscout.net/blog/why-steve-jobs-never-listened-to-his-customers/


Related posts by Deb:


                  




Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The Wisdom of Crowds has individual and collective component, when you dig down deep.  The JCPenney example cited in this story is also a good cautionary tale.  ~  D

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5 Examples of Companies Innovating with Crowdsourcing

5 Examples of Companies Innovating with Crowdsourcing | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"The rapid exchange of data needed to maintain competitiveness demands access to multiple, fluid sources of information.  Crowdsourcing helps this happen."

        

Excerpts, 3 examples:
    

Anheuser-Busch (AB)– The world’s leading brewer, ...sought customer input to develop a brand more attuned to craft-beer tastes. Development of Black Crown, a golden amber lager, combined a competition between company-brewmasters with consumer suggestions and tastings; this project had more than 25,000 consumer-collaborators.


Coca-Cola– Coke now uses a more open business model, assuming an increasingly prominent position in corporate crowdsourcing. Its open-sourced “Shaping a Better Future” challenge asks entrepreneurs to create improvement-ventures for the project-hubs of youth employment, education, environment and health.

ucts more effectively, once again tying social media to co-creation.  


Unilever– Despite its globally-recognized and respected research staff and facilities, Unilever understands the value of collaboration with innovative partners from outside the firm. It seeks external contributions from anyone with useful input into such diverse project challenges as storing renewable energy, fighting viruses, reducing the quantity of sodium in food, creating cleaning-products that pollute less.


Click the title to see the full list of 5.


Related tools & [posts by Deb:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here are some current, corporate examples of crowdsourcing, which is also finding its way to government and non-profits as well.   Some say that anything corporate, or having top-down management of the project or guidance from an external organisation for solely commercial constructs is not crowdsourcing.

Regardless, now that complex, adaptive systems has arrived as a part of the conversation, along with terms like  M4IS2  (Multinational, Multiagency, Multidisciplinary, Multidomain Information-Sharing and Sense-Making)  - crowdsourcing will have a chance to prove if it is a sign of our times, including concepts of creative destruction and reinvention. ~ D

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 26, 2014 3:12 PM

Here are some current, corporate examples of crowdsourcing, which is also finding its way to government and non-profits as well.   Some say that anything corporate, or having top-down management of the project or guidance from an external organisation for solely commercial constructs is not crowdsourcing.

Regardless, now that complex, adaptive systems has arrived as a part of the conversation, along with terms like  M4IS2  (Multinational, Multiagency, Multidisciplinary, Multidomain Information-Sharing and Sense-Making)  - crowdsourcing will have a chance to prove if it is a sign of our times, including concepts of creative destruction and reinvention. ~ D