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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Remote Control for Daily Living: Google's Nest Deal & Mobile

Remote Control for Daily Living: Google's Nest Deal & Mobile | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Google’s proposed acquisition of Nest Labs for $3.2 billion is reflective of how the definition of mobile is changing ...[to include] wearables, connected cars, smart appliances and other hardware 


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...the mobile phone ...a..remote control for everyday life...

   

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The deal is the latest move by Google to extend its mobile business with an eye toward making smartphones and tablets the [the means] to connect with other devices throughout their day.

   

“Google's acquisition of Nest makes the mobile phone a consumer's remote control for everyday life,” said Andrea Wilson, Fort Worth, TX-based vice president, strategy director and luxury practice lead at iProspect.


.....Android is already the most widely used mobile operating system in the world. A recent report from Gartner found that Android accounted for nearly 82 percent of all smartphone sales during the third quarter of 2013.

Related posts & tools by Deb:


     

      

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:
Ken Burbary writes up a helpful piece on where Google is headed.

Having recently switched to a Droid Samsung S4 for its amazing voice recognition and texting enhancements, while remaining a die-hard Apple fan, suggests that Ken is onto the key intention of Google to be a part of our everyday lives.  Google Glass anyone?
Examples:
  • I love the Gee Whiz of my factor of my phone, to run Roku or Aero off my TV, especially when the Roku remote WAS NOT working.
   
  • Taking photos of checks for deposit is pretty cool.  Yes, any phone can do this, but hey, the key fact is we ARE doing it - adult kids and parents in the house.
    
  • Boomers are helping each other learn their phones, perhaps on those bus rides to Stratford (Shakespeare plays.)
   
  • Sorry Siri, but Google voice on a Droid can set my alarm clock just as easily, and has amazing voice recognition accuracy.
      
If you've used your phone with smart appliances, a smart furnance / AC or such, tell us how it is working.    Best, ~  Deb
 
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Improvisation May Be the Key to Successfully Managing Change, MIT

Improvisation May Be the Key to Successfully Managing Change, MIT | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Key attributes for almost any organization, and SO CHALLENGING to implement: agility , flexibility, improvisation – a company’s ability to quickly change is crucial to its long-term success."


 MIT's Leadership Center weighs in via an article by professor Wanda J. Orlikowski that equates a successful company to an orchestra.   Yes, I've heard this before.  Benjamin Zander is quite compelling in his leadership videos on this very note, pun intended.


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...to allow for improvisation, CEOs need to release some control and allow employees to experiment.
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What is helpful in the article is yet another example of "letting go" as in, "sometimes, however, the conductor needs to let go and let its skilled and creative musicians lead."  Well now, MIT, yes.  And Orpheus, the conductor-less orchestra, has taught us as much.  Releasing "some control" as quoted below, is the magic sauce, in my opinion, and adding in some feedback and perspective, on lessons learned, is a part of it.


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"sometimes, however, the conductor needs to let go and let its skilled and creative musicians lead."


Yes, Orpheus, the conductor-less orchestra, has taught us as much. 


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It is always, helpful, however to review suggestions for how to create and sustain an agile, flexible, improvisational culture.  


Here are Orlikowski's tips for creating such an organization, excerpted:


  • Plan to improvise - sometimes you can anticipate change, and if you can do that, you should plan to address that change in a flexible way
  • Adapt when you cannot foresee – as business rules are changing, adapt and test on a smaller, departmental scale before making company-wide changes
  • Create a learning environment – encourage communication between your employees in different locations and departments, push everyone to learn from each other
  • Encourage flexibility – to allow for improvisation, CEOs need to release some control and allow employees to experiment
  • Improvise today for success tomorrow – create a culture of experimentation and improvisation even when you’re not experiencing extreme change in practice for when you do need to change



A companion article and video to this one is how Asst. Professor Steve Leybourne, Boston University experiences improv connected with the finance industry, creating a model and citing risk, reward in managers who surreptitiously improvise.   In his video, you'll see evidence of the "let go of micromanaging" and still how it is tentative in corporate culture.  It seems we have a long way to go to let go, but writing about those who research it is a start.  


  • Source:  http://www.scoop.it/t/innovation-institutions-will-it-blend/p/1715217458/moving-beyond-surreptitious-manager-improv-risk-reward-emerging-best-practice-in-your-org-steve-leybourne


What is your experience with creating a culture that is agile , flexible, and especially improvisational?



Photo credit:   ePi.Longo  Article source:  Chief Executive Magazine

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