Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Streamlining by Going Online with Faculty Promotion and Tenure Resources

Streamlining by Going Online with Faculty Promotion and Tenure Resources | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Facing the administrative burden of promotion/tenure for roughly 240 candidates each year, the University of Florida developed an online promotion and tenure work process.

   

....Outcomes
After only a year and a half of full implementation, outcomes have included:

  • a 90 percent reduction in paper, 
  • a reduction in printing and administrative costs, 
  • a marked reduction in work time for faculty and staff, 
  • consistency and conformance within the tenure review process, 
  • easier accessibility to promotion and tenure packets for academic reviewers, 
  • improved transparency at all review levels, and 
  • the ability for tenure candidates to monitor their progress throughout the cycle. 

      
The cost savings for the first year alone was nearly $203,000.


Related posts by Deb:
      

         

        


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here's a university that did something to update the wasteful and inefficient tenure review process.  This included reducing paper-intensive practices by 90% and providing progress reports to tenure candidates.

     

It remains to be seen how other universities handle the larger promotion and tenure process in the 21st century, connected with changes in higher education as a whole.  ~  Deb

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Compensation Bloat? University of Michigan faculty question administrator pay in open letter

Compensation Bloat?  University of Michigan faculty question administrator pay in open letter | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

An open letter to University of Michigan's Board of Regents from about a dozen of the school's faculty criticizes the school's administrative pay and bonus system. "The University is in desperate and urgent need of fiscal reform." 


____________________
   
The authors argue that U-M is not transparent about its pay supplements...some administrators received...in excess of $50,000.

     

____________________


The authors argue that U-M is not transparent about its pay supplements, and that they are an unwise use of money from the general fund. Data obtained by the professors show that some administrators received salary supplements in excess of $50,000.

  

...Anthony Mora, a history professor who helped author the letter, said that while it's reasonable executive officers have higher compensation that most staff, U-M's compensation rates for those officers are between 27 and 41 percent higher than the rates' of administrators at peer institutions such as Berkeley, Texas and Virginia, according to a review done by the faculty.
 

"We want to have an open and candid discussion about the university's resources," Mora said. "I don't see this as an effort to be adversarial with the administration. I think people in the administration are genuine when they say they care about the university. But I do think there's an opportunity here for the faculty and the administration to work together."

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The escalating costs of higher education may no longer be taken for granted with such moves as these from the core of  the university system, the faculty.

The article also referenced the initially poorly implemented, cost cutting administrative shared services initiative (labeled AST, Administrative Services Transformation)  that did not include the faculty voice in its cost cutting planning and involved the use of several consulting firms with expenses totalling over 11 million for consulting services.  As as consultant myself, I know consultant have reasons to charge a high rate, but leaving the faculty voice out of a change initiative mystifies me.


I look forward to hearing where this letter leads in dealing with, perhaps, some unquestioned compensation practices.   ~  Deb


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 25, 2014 4:05 PM

Several faculty have taken up the gauntlet to question escalating costs - starting with higher education administrative bonuses.  Executive bonuses may no longer be taken for granted with such moves as these, perhaps prompted by the poorly planned, cost cutting administrative shared services initiative (labeled AST, Administrative Services Transformation)  which, incidentally, did NOT include the faculty voice in its cost cutting planning.


It also involved the use of several consulting firms with expenses totalling over 11 million for consulting services.  As as consultant myself, I know consultant have reasons to charge a high rate, but leaving the faculty voice out of a change initiative mystifies me.


I look forward to hearing where this letter leads in dealing with, perhaps, some unquestioned compensation practices, and perhaps stepping higher education back to a bigger picture of where the value generation resides and how it needs to be valued today.   ~  Deb

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Everything old is new again, Fax to Phone, ADDIE to DADDIE, Simon to iPhone

“...it takes on average 20 years for a technology to make the transition from first articulation to maturity (defined as becoming a $1billion industry)…the mouse, for example, took 30 years. “ – Bill Buxton, Principle researcher MicrosoftPatent

This SlideShare features the evolution of the inventions of the fax machine,  first envisioned and patented in 1843 by Scotsman Alexander Bain, improved on by others, then once again by Giovanni Castelli, an Italian priest.  In 1865, Castelli went on to establish the first Paris public fax service.  The service worked over telegraph lines and ran between Paris and Lyon.  ...This was still 11 years before the invention of the telephone.


Presentation by Stephanie Rieger of Yiibu at the MobX Conference in Berlin, Germany November 17, 2012.
        

Related tools & posts by Deb:

       

       

             

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This slideshare provides research and insights into the pace of adoption for innovation, such as invention of the fax machine and THEN the telephone.  It follows my recent ScoopIt about ADDIE evolving to DADDIE for instructional design.

Quote from the article, "we don't always know the true value of a technology until a related one comes along."  


A colleague also shared in the ADDIE to DADDIE example,  "recent approaches may be old processes in new packaging, each with their own value and merit."  Adapt, evolve, reinvent. ~ D

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Zappos says Goodbye to Bosses & Bureaucracy - Hello to Holacracy

Zappos says Goodbye to Bosses & Bureaucracy - Hello to Holacracy | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

The famed, unique Las Vegas-based shoe retailer...will eliminate traditional managers, do away with the typical corporate hierarchy and get rid of job titles, at least internally.

__________________
 
....bureaucracy ...was getting in the way of adaptability.”

    

__________________


The unusual approach is called a “holacracy,” replacing the traditional corporate chain of command with a series of overlapping, self-governing “circles.” In theory, this gives employees more of a voice in the way the company is run.


According to Zappos executives, the move is an effort to keep the 1,500-person company from becoming too rigid, too unwieldy and too bureaucratic as it grows.


“As we scaled, we noticed that the bureaucracy we were all used to was getting in the way of adaptability,” says Zappos’s John Bunch, who is helping lead the transition to the new structure.


Holacracy ...has a couple of high-profile devotees — Twitter cofounder Evan Williams uses it at his new company, Medium, and time management guru David Allen uses it run his firm — but Zappos is by far the largest company to adopt the idea.]


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I'm intrigued to see this second emergence of holacracy.  Do we have an agile organizational structure developing here?

I'm sensing the far edge of a trend here, especially after facilitating Open Space events (self-led interest topics on a theme) in the last couple of years,.  I've mostly used them in a professional learning context, although three client organizations have used this organic, adaptible format for planning & strategy.  


In my view. it seems that these leaders are shifting perspective, letting go of some of the trappings of the 90's, to embrance more adaptive structures that can help fuel innovation.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, January 6, 2014 8:44 PM

Adaptive communication.  It's time for something far beyond Fredrick Taylor's scientific management 1920's style bureacraciy.  I'm sensing this is the calm before the storm of change to move beyond traditional management structures.  There will be more holacracies and their kin to come.  ~  D

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World for What It Is, or What It Could Be? Elon Musk, Tesla Motors

World for What It Is, or What It Could Be? Elon Musk, Tesla Motors | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

We need people who can execute ...including mastering acceleration.


Elon Musk

Recently featured in a Wall Street Journal article, Musk is compared to Steve Jobs, another visionary, and is then discussed as follows:


Elon Musks's ambitions soar even higher...


His electric-car company Tesla Motors aims to remake the way we drive, while the ultimate goal of his rocket company SpaceX, he said, is to travel to Mars and help build a self-sustaining base there.


______________________

We need people who can execute. Too often people jump ship before they see an idea through...

______________________


Skepticism?  ...each time Mr. Musk delivers a better, less-expensive electric car or launches another rocket successfully, he proves his doubters wrong.


...he co-founded a multibillion-dollar company called PayPal.


...Musk...taught himself to code and program software by the age of 12.


After ...leaving a PhD program at Stanford, Musk dedicated himself to the three important problems that would most affect the future of humanity.  "One was the internet, one was clean energy, and one was space."


All three are revolutionary spaces, and to work in all three most certainly requires an individual willing to completely reinvent himself and his expertise to change course as needed.


We need people who can execute. Too often people jump ship before they see an idea through and don't even begin to master the competency of acceleration before they are onto the next thing.


Related posts from Deb:

     



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Originally posted on my Change Leadership Watch stream, it also is highly instructive to the innovation theme, especially with the lessons of staying-the-course with the new idea and execution.  ~ Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 10, 2013 11:01 AM

The Tesla story has elements of sensing the future that can be instructive for anyone in a change space including innovation.  ~  D

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Bill Gates Futuring and HR/Recruiting Stuck in a Time Warp

Bill Gates Futuring and HR/Recruiting Stuck in a Time Warp | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Bill Gates has been in the media of late with “My Plan to Fix the World’s Biggest Problems.”


Gates’ solution is about continuous improvement.  However ...as Gates’ says, this is simple in concept, but often difficult to execute.  

  


Excerpts:
  
While times have changed for most business functions, it seems that the HR and recruiting departments are stuck in a time warp, circa 1975.

  

1) Stop using skills and experience-based job descriptions.... Instead require the hiring manager to define the job in terms of 6-8 measurable performance objectives.


2) Measure the hiring manager’s ability to attract, develop and retain top people.


3) Never interview more than four people for any job.


4) Define Quality of Hire before the person’s hired based on a performance-based job description.


Related article from Deb:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The author of this article uses HR and recruiting as an example of old practices that need updating as good hires (and good talent development and succession planning) are the front door to smart, high performance cultures.

Balanced scorecards began to be used for the very reason of taking HR's people hire impact into a balanced account of measurement, beyond finance to internal business, learning and growth.


Using performance based job descriptions and innovation (refurbishing boring jobs) can be transforming to organizations still working from a 70's model of HR.

Be aware, overdoing metrics also has drawbacks, such auto companies over-relying on measurement, via ill-conceived management purges (that also appeared age-driven.)  Staffers served in roles as mentors that also produced lower numbers in their metrics because they were taking time to help newly hired and learning youngers.  The lack of a systemic focus lowered productivity and morale at the same time.  

~ Deb

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Leading in a VUCA world

Leading in a VUCA world | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"How’s your leadership working on in your VUCA world (Volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous)? "


Liz Guthridge has written a great post on leading in a VUCA world; VCUA stands for volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous, a term coined by the US Army War College in the weeks before September 11, 2001.  


Liz & I discussed the need for collaboration and community across disciplines to succeed in a VUCA world in connection with our recent panel + Open Space presentation we did for a global change conference.


__________________________


VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

__________________________


Here are some excerpts of her take on the insightful presentation by one of our keynote presenters:


"Leading in a VUCA world" is a popular phrase with Bob Johansen, a distinguished fellow and former president of Institute for the Future.


According to Dr. Johansen, who shared his 2020 forecast at the Association of Change Management Professionals global conference this week, our VUCA world is not going away. In fact it’s just going to spin faster during the next decade.


In his talk “External Future Forces That Will Disrupt the Practice of Change Management,” Dr. Johansen noted that VUCA is not necessarily doom and gloom. While VUCA can provide threats, it also can offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.”


As for his two big 2022 predictions for organizational change agents, they are:


1. “The digital natives (now 16 years or younger) will create new practices to make change through gaming.” (The other key phrase besides gaming in this sentence is “make.” Dr. Johansen predicts that a culture of makers will drive the next generation of change. And as a result, leaders need to show the “maker instinct” trait.)


2. “Reciprocity-based innovation will focus on the economic, social and psychological value of reciprocity.” (Two important traits for leaders are smart-mob organizing and commons creating. Think Creative Commons.)


Dr. Johansen challenged the 825 of us in attendance to figure out how to help people and organizations adapt to these changes and others.


To do this, we should watch our terms and our questions.  Read Liz's full post here.

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Tom Hood's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:16 PM

We just covered this in our townhall this past Monday. Arelene Thomas (AICPA/CGMA) talked about VUCA related to CPAs in Biz/Industry.


VUCA can provide threats [and] offer opportunities, especially if you translate VUCA as “vision, understanding, clarity and agility.” ~ Dr. Bob Johansen

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 6, 2013 5:26 PM

We need to consider VUCA

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Tina Brown and Björk, Sisters of Innovation - Get ready for the True Digital Natives.

Tina Brown and Björk, Sisters of Innovation - Get ready for the True Digital Natives. | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Björk and Tina Brown have many differences but one common problem: They are watching the boat beneath them sink. Innovation is a strong option out of a death spiral."


The helpful piece by Mr. McCracken mirrors the blend of the real and virtual as Bob Johansen, futurist, covered so well in the middle keynote of the ACMP 2012 conference I attended in Las Vegas this past week.  (The Association of Change Management Professionals.)


Seeing babies interact with the iPad, then attempt to interact with magazines in the same way (it's broken), was one of the most compelling of Johansen's keynote elements and points about the real digital natives (less than 16 years of age.)  


  • I want to try the same experiment with babies near me, and expect the same result.


Bob Johansen's book is a compelling read, on the iPad it will be, for me.  Bob spoke on the topic:  Leaders Make the Future: Ten New Leadership Skills for an Uncertain Age


Excerpted from Grant McCracken's post today:


Björk and Tina Brown have many differences but one common problem: They are watching the boat beneath them sink. Their print and music industries are being disintermediated by the digital revolution. They are struggling to respond to the blue-ocean and white-space and black-swan disruption that besets us all.


Brown and Björk had enough altitude to glide to career's end.  [Their] experiments may not save them (or us). But they've given us cultural innovations of some interest. And daring.


Björk's Biophilia isn't just an album. It's an app. We open it to discover a jewel-like universe, a 3D model of galaxies in space. As we spin these, we discover hot spots. And when we investigate them, music begins to play. The music of the spheres has come unto the iPad.


Björk and Brown are forcing their way out of old models into promising new ground. 


Harvard Business Review blog author: Grant McCracken is a research affiliate at MIT and the author of Chief Culture Officer. His most recent book, Culturematic, is forthcoming this May from Harvard Business Review Press.


Photo credit: Bjork, by Vivi Gondek via Flickr

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RELENTLESS! Reinventing Higher Education, Southern New Hampshire University @SNHU via Fast Company

RELENTLESS!  Reinventing Higher Education,  Southern New Hampshire University @SNHU via Fast Company | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"As president of Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU), LeBlanc is ...using technology to transform an 80-year-old college into a modern education powerhouse."


I tweeted about @SNHU over a year ago, as I was intrigued they had an MBA in Social Media.  However, it led to a conversation with several people at the institution.  


After experiencing a considerable amount of the hidebound nature of the ivory tower of higher education, the experience I had with SNHU was a breath of fresh air, informed by data and, could it be, skilled process?


New England is the land of the ivies.   So much the better for @SNHU (their twitter handle) to leverage what they do as they think & implement differently.


Stay tuned, an interview may soon follow...


Excerpts:

Founded in 1932 as the New Hampshire School of Accounting and Secretarial Science, SNHU was a modest school when Le­Blanc joined as president in 2003, recognized for its culinary arts, business, and justice programs. Its online program was, as LeBlanc puts it, "a sleepy operation on a nondescript corner of the main campus. I thought it was squandering an opportunity."


That little operation has turned into SNHU’s Center for Online and Continuing Education (COCE), the largest online-degree provider in New England.


Its 10,600 students are enrolled in 120 graduate and undergraduate programs and specialties, everything from a sustainability-focused MBA to a creative-writing BA.


Fifty more programs will be launched this year, and the COCE recently tested TV ads in national markets such as Raleigh, North Carolina; Milwaukee; and Oklahoma City.


LeBlanc hopes that by 2014 SNHU will boast the country’s biggest online not-for-profit education system.

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The Faculty Project offers Free Online Courses from Elite College Faculty | Inside Higher Ed

The Faculty Project offers Free Online Courses from Elite College Faculty | Inside Higher Ed | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Bricks and mortar institutions:  meet online disruptors in the academy.  Udemy is the next shoe dropping with its Faculty Project, online courses offered by professors at a number of top institutions.

 

This announcement comes right on the heels of news about a Stanford professor leaving his tenured job in order to reach bigger audiences that have flocked to his artificial intelligence course online.

 

Excerpt:

Udemy, a company that allows anyone to create and sell courses through its online platform, has announced a new area of its site, called The Faculty Project, devoted to courses by professors at a number of top institutions, such as Colgate, Duke University, Stanford University, Northwestern University, Vanderbilt University, the University of Virginia, Dartmouth College and Vassar College. While Udemy is a for-profit enterprise, the Faculty Project courses will be free.

 

The goal is to “elevate the brand,” according to Gagan Biyani, Udemy’s president and co-founder. The company says it has no immediate plans to monetize the Faculty Project, and would never do so without the input and permission of its faculty contributors.


Via Smithstorian, Keith Hampson PhD
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Leading Change: Three Major Misconceptions That Hinder Innovation

Leading Change: Three Major Misconceptions That Hinder Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Innovation has become vital for value creation. More than ever will it distinguish successful institutions from the less successful..."


Three fundamental misconceptions stick out.


1. Innovation is synonym for change:

Too often innovation and change initiatives are mixed up. Many change initiatives are actually improvement oriented and based on knowledge and examples that are already available in the marketplace (best practices, benchmarks, pilots), and are therefore not innovative.


Real innovation requires a company to go first, to go where no one has been before; to be a leader rather than a follower.


2. Innovation is a business goal as any other:

Research shows that successful innovation depends on the level of strategic alignment in the organization: alignment between the corporate strategy, the innovation strategy and the corporate culture (see a recent study in S+B on this). Innovation is therefore more fundamental.


It requires a specific innovation strategy and culture, based on:

  • a profound understanding of the external developments, 
  • how we adjust our strategy to it, 
  • in what part of the business (products, services, processes, systems) we need to innovate, 
  • how we use our qualities and competencies to create innovation, 
  • what competencies we are missing and need to develop, 
  • how we deal with trial & error and failure, 
  • how we will change the way we work in teams, 
  • how we will refocus resources.
=

3. An innovation culture is something you can copy from successful innovative companies:   Wrong, doing what others do is not innovating! You can learn lessons from others, but you will have to translate those to your own reality.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, December 19, 2011 11:54 AM
Also from Deb: This is one of the better blog posts I've seen out there, especially highlighting specific differences between innovation strategy and change management. The list alone mirrors recent innovation consulting strategy in consulting organizations.
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Innovation, Impact, Change Words: Enough Talk, More Do | The Nonprofit Quarterly

Innovation, Impact, Change Words: Enough Talk, More Do | The Nonprofit Quarterly | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

This matches my current experience.  Does it match yours in the fields of innovation and change leadership?

 

Excerpt:  If you’re a nonprofit news junkie, you know it’s nearly impossible to go a day without reading or hearing the words “innovation” and “impact.

"It’s little surprise, then, that collective eyes are beginning to roll when the terms innovation and impact are tossed around with little explication as to what they look like on the ground and within a more systematic framework. So, maybe it’s time to start putting our money where our mouths are and get serious about assessing what, exactly, is true innovation; and, most important, what are the kinds of innovation that lead to real impact—especially those that can be rigorously assessed and measured..."  Source:  @npquarterly 


Via Karen Steffensen, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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40 Pieces of Inspiration For Entrepreneurs | Under30CEO

40 Pieces of Inspiration For Entrepreneurs | Under30CEO | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Here are forty tips designed to help entrepreneurs, business leaders, mavericks and aspiring innovators accelerate our collective and individual pursuits towards inspiration.

 

Excerpts 

 

1. Honestly evaluate your professional and social circle of friends. Are they inspiring? Do they truly stretch your imagine of what is possible in this lifetime? I  ...Identify and build an inspiring new circle. You cannot choose your family, but you can select the people whom you spend time and associate with.

 

Ask yourself, do your companions consume or catalyze change?

 

3. Remove physical, emotional, mental and spiritual clutter from your life.  ...It is useless hanging on. Today is a new day.

 

5. Stop trying to find yourself and start creating yourself. ...What will be your ultimate legacy and contribution to the world? Become and evolve into your vision.

 

7. Forget and ignore your past academic and professional accomplishments  ...and designation. In a battlefield, the stripes you have earned are irrelevant to your ultimate goal of crossing the line and securing an inspired life.

 

Image:  by AlicePopkorn, Flickr

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Looks Promising! New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function

Looks Promising! New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Australian researchers have come up with a non-invasive ultrasound technology that clears the brain of neurotoxic amyloid plaques responsible for memory loss in Alzheimer’s patients.

    

The research team reports fully restoring the memories of 75 percent of the mice they tested it on, with zero damage to the surrounding brain tissue. They found that the treated mice displayed improved performance in three memory tasks - a maze, a test to get them to recognize new objects, and one to get them to remember the places they should avoid.
     

Alzheimer’s affects 50 million worldwide. A team from the Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) have come up with a promising solution for removing the defective brain beta-amyloid and tau proteins.
     

Publishing in Science Translational Medicine, the team describes the technique as using a particular type of ultrasound called a focused therapeutic ultrasound, which non-invasively beams sound waves into the brain tissue. By oscillating super-fast, these sound waves are able to gently open up the blood-brain barrier, which is a layer that protects the brain against bacteria, and stimulate the brain’s microglial cells to move in. Microglila cells are basically waste-removal cells, so once they get past the blood-brain barrier, they’re able to clear out the toxic beta-amyloid clumps before the blood-brain barrier is restored within a few hours.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I and the friends and families of those who know someone with Alzheimer's, estimated 50 million, hope this is true.  It could be the breakthrough we need with implications for huge change in the world.  ~  Deb

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Richard Platt's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:43 PM

Very promising trials, now it will need to pass FDA testing, given that ultrasound has typically been shown to be non-invasive and generally harmless this does seem like something that is worth investigating.

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Disruptive Technology and Innovation Requires Change Management & New Talent Strategy

Disruptive Technology and Innovation Requires Change Management & New Talent Strategy | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
HR professionals know that anything that causes business disruptions is certain to have implications for human resource management, including the growth of 3-D printing.


I admit I'm looking forward to it. I think the 3-D printer is such a disruptive technology that I want to be in on the fun.


______________________
   

...The teenager found the plans on the Internet. Imagine, open-sourced body parts!

    

______________________

   


The news reports range from 3-D printing an iPhone case to high-heel shoes, or models of body parts on which doctors can practice.


...my favorite use of the technology so far goes to a teenager who used a 3-D printer at a local library to build a prosthetic hand for a boy who was born without fingers. The hand opens and closes and can even hold a pencil. The teenager found the plans on the Internet. Imagine, open-sourced body parts!


Implications for HR leaders? 
  

McKinsey recently issued a report highlighting some of the business disruptions that are likely to result from this new technology.



______________________

   

... there may be very specific, and difficult to find, talent requirements for such a shift, and begin to devise a talent-development and sourcing strategy to meet the [need]

   

______________________

   

3-D technology  -- aka additive manufacturing -- is likely to accelerate product development.  ... Value may not come from manufacturing a product; it may come from being able to add uniqueness to the design alone.

   

  • Don't wait until someone tells you it might have an impact: Know the business well enough to raise the issue if no one has mentioned it already. 
     
  • Help the executive team consider the strategic implications of the technology and whether it can be leveraged to the business' advantage or whether the business needs to be prepared to meet new forms of competition.
    
  • Recognize that there may be very specific, and difficult to find, talent requirements for such a shift, and begin to devise a talent-development and sourcing strategy to meet the skilled-worker needs of a new manufacturing strategy.

 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a quality article emphasizing the need to be ready for adaptive change, perhaps fast.  As author Susan R. Meisinger suggests, be "not only be prepared to manage the change, ...be leaders within the organization in embracing and driving change."  I'd add, create a learning environment now with leadership at all levels to empower your ability to change together.  Share what's important to be ready.  ~  D

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5 Ways to Bring Creativity Back to Your Culture

5 Ways to Bring Creativity Back to Your Culture | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
All too often, entrepreneurs build companies that stifle the very creativity they need. Here's how to get that creative spark back.


Excerpted:  Four changes (of five) you can make today to bring creativity back to your culture.

       

Offer Unlimited Vacation

Offering unlimited vacation won't make people skip work every Friday or leave people hanging at deadlines. Instead, it will give them control to choose when they decide to work and when they don't. Although this may seem trivial, being able to choose means everything in a creative culture.

   

Ditch the Meetings

The worst part about meetings is that they're incredibly easy to add. Even if you make an agenda, the number will only go up as you grow in size. As a result, little creative thinking will get done during the day.

    

Nix Department Goals

Department goals often help managers more than employees. Generally, you'll end up wasting valuable hours setting new goals and then even more time asking why you didn't hit them.
 

Worse still, each department relies on resources they don't control and departments they're not a part of to reach their goals. This can result in teams signing up for work they were unaware of, which can lead to arguments about whose goals are more important.

      

Give Plenty of Feedback

...A lot of companies make feedback a formal process, waiting until the end of the month, quarter, or year to share how they actually feel.


Creative cultures thrive on timely, spontaneous feedback. Whether it's good or bad, feedback helps teams raise their own expectations. It's the fuel you need to ignite a creative culture. And who doesn't want one of those?

     

Read more here.



Related tools & posts by Deb:

     

  • Don't miss a thing by subscribing to Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE curation streams @Deb Nystrom, REVELN, featuring three gold award change-themed streams, shared once a month via email,  free here,via REVELN Tools.

     

    

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I left off his "Let Employees Work Remotely" not because I don't believe it helps, it's just that it has been challenged because of the need to interact with others, examine blind spots, and building a culture does involve a certain amount of showing up.

~  Deb 

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The innovation mind behind Tesla, SpaceX, SolarCity: Elon Musk

Entrepreneur Elon Musk is a man with many plans. The founder of PayPal, Tesla Motors and SpaceX sits down with TED curator Chris Anderson to share details about what's next.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Shared from my Change Leadership Watch as a companion to another innovation post about Elon Musk on this stream.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 21, 2013 10:56 PM

A TED talk that has made it to the list, "15 TED Talks That Will Change Your Life," belongs on this stream, and goes with a previous post here a few days ago.  ~  Deb

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Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks

Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen literally wrote the book on technology disruption...and he thinks Apple, Tesla Motors, venture capitalists and most of the nation’s colleges and universities should be afraid."

  

The author of The Innovator’s Dilemma said Wednesday that all of them could be killed by less advanced competitors in the same way that many once dominant technology companies have been in the past.

  

...He believes that and the commoditization of smartphones threaten Apple in the long run.

  

...“For 300 years, higher education was not disruptable because there was no technological core."

  

“But now online learning brings to higher education this technological core, and people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.'

__________________

    

...people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.

__________________


...“there is a different business model that is disrupting this in addition to online learning. It’s on-the-job education. ...you come in for a week and we’ll teach you about strategy and you go off and develop a strategy.  


...You learn it and you use it. These are very different business models and that’s what’s killing us.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've posted this to BOTH Change Leader Watch & here.  On the Innovations & Institutions stream, I'll be adding examples of organizations that are adapting to this disruption in academe and the other industries mentioned.  ~  Deb

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Marie Jeffery's comment, February 11, 2013 11:13 AM
KMInstitute.org
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, February 17, 2013 4:30 PM
Thanks for your comments Marie. Knowledge Management is quite an industry, with various opinions of the traction it holds in business. I am most curious as to where it is headed.
Patrick J Scanlon's curator insight, March 12, 2013 5:58 PM

If you don't like change.  You will like irrelevance even less #media #higherEd #VC

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Here Come The Intrapreneurs - Forbes

Here Come The Intrapreneurs - Forbes | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"There is a third way, and it's called being an intrapreneur."


Yes, you can innovate from the inside, but as in many organizations, it depends on culture, climate, placement, experience, network, and many other factors.


___________________________


a large organization that becomes complacent and loses sight of the benefits of having an entrepreneurial streak built into their massive global systems can find themselves disrupted in short order. ~ David Armano

___________________________


Here's a recent Forbes interview take on an older idea, intrapreneuring, that has been around awhile.  It's always worth a look, if it might tip the scales in favor of your organization being more intrapreneurial.


Excerpted:


From the full post by David Armano, executive VP, Global Innovation & Integration at Edelman.


while entrepreneurialism seems to be enjoying a golden age of sorts, it isn’t for everyone.


An intrapreneur is someone who has an entrepreneurial streak in his or her DNA, but chooses to align his or her talents with a large organization in place of creating his or her own.


...several years ago when I struck up a conversation with an older gentleman at a train station and I described what I did for a living, he said something I’ll never forget: “Oh, you’re an intrapreneur–so was I.”


...Some of my peers who are doing work in the social business industry also are intrapreneurs whether they suspect it or not:  

  • Scott Monty of Ford, 
  • Ekaterina Walter of Intel, 
  • Richard Binhammer of Dell, 
  • Pete Blackshaw of Nestlé, 
  • Bonin Bough of Kraft and 
  • Frank Eliason of Citi, to name a few.


The start-up community has successfully demonstrated that the modern world needs entrepreneurs.


But this only makes intrapreneurs more critical, because in a world filled with fast-moving change, a large organization that becomes complacent and loses sight of the benefits of having an entrepreneurial streak built into their massive global systems can find themselves disrupted in short order.


This is where intrapreneurs come in handy. Smart organizations will seek out individuals who like to invent, innovate and want to be on the front lines of change. 


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Shedding Legacy Industry Practices: Bank To Store & Coffee Shop Innovation

Shedding Legacy Industry Practices: Bank To Store & Coffee Shop Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Customer experiences are delivered year after year without challenging the approach in what they do.  This unique bank reinvented their customer service approach and culture.”  


The banking industry is one of the more entrenched, which drew my attention to this innovation case example.


Excerpted:

CEO Ray Davis Explains His Decision to Change Umpqua’s Purpose:   Umpqua Bank has a quirky, lighthearted nature for a financial services company, perhaps because they started with the simple goal to help loggers and farmers with their banking.


...Observing Umpqua’s lack of a clear customer-service approach, CEO Ray Davis decided to make a change. In a move away from traditional banking, he renamed Umpqua locations “stores.”  In redesigned “stores,” “shoppers” could browse products and services, stay as long as they wanted, sit a spell with their legs up on a comfy chair, and sip a cup of coffee. And when they were ready, they could tap an Umpqua associate to help them with their banking needs—all without the red ropes.


At Umpqua, customers are not herded into a line for service, and they don’t have to stand in separate lines to get different services. Dedicated associates assist each customer from start to finish.

“Umpqua Bank is part Internet café, part community center, and part bank. The coffee’s good and it’s not a bad place to sit and read a book.”

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5 Factors and Adoption Rate Tools to Predict Change Success with your Innovation – VinJones

5 Factors and Adoption Rate Tools to Predict Change Success with your Innovation – VinJones | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
The excerpted post below is part of a two part series that offers change and innovation adoption rate tools.


What I like about Kevin's 2-part series is that it is not about the unconvincing ROI, return on investment metric. It is about the powerful effect of stories, examples and case studies that inspire and "spark ...imagination.


His first post focuses on the five (5) factors to use to predict the rate of adoption. The second post offers tools and templates to give you an adoption rate measurement.

___________________________


Contrary to popular belief, an ROI will not convince them. ...it is stories and examples and case studies which spark their imagination. ~ Kevin Jones, vinJones.com

___________________________


Also keep in mind that change and innovation are quite different from each other. This is particularly highlighted in our two curation streams: Innovation in Institutions, Will it Blend? and the one you are reading, Change Leadership Watch.


We are also highlighting Kevin's tools on CMRsite.com, a non-partisan change management resources site.


Excerpts:


The Adoption Index
One of my favorite books is Diffusion of Innovations by Everett M. Rogers. Although this largely academic book was originally written in 1962, it hasn’t lost any of its usefulness. It explains why innovations and technologies are adopted, or not, and at what rate.


1)“Relative advantage is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as better than the idea it supersedes."


The degree of relative advantage may be measured in economic terms, but social prestige factors, convenience, and satisfaction are also important factors.”


2)“Compatibility is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as being consistent with the existing values, past experiences, and needs of potential adopters.


3)“Complexity is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as difficult to understand and use.”


Read the full post for all five factors and the link to part 2 of the series that offers adoption rate tools.



via vinjones.com

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Game-based Learning & Higher Education, Jane McGonigal & TED | Online Universities

Game-based Learning & Higher Education, Jane McGonigal & TED | Online Universities | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

McGonigal’s hypothesis for higher education is that, if we can create engaging and fun games based on meaningful real world problems, we have the ability to leverage an incredible amount of energy and passion to solve the world’s biggest problems.


Urgent Optimism, Social Fabric, Blissful productivity and Epic Meaning are the four tenets proposed by game designer Jane McGonigal in her TED talk.  


Game-based learning is beginning to happen in the public schools. The work of Katie Salen and her Quest2Learn school in NYC and the work of University of Wisconsin gaming researcher Kurt Squire are two notable examples of the power of gaming in education and the impact that it can have on learning.


However, educational institutions are notoriously slow to change. The good news is that they may not be able to hold back a wave of change that is about to crest. Gaming has become an increasingly important part of culture and its spread into public education means that students entering college in the next several years are going to have an expectation that gaming will be a part of the college curriculum.


If higher education does not adapt to meet this demand, it may find itself in even deeper trouble than it already is as potential students seek alternative paths to have their interests satisfied. If an initiative such as the MacArthur Foundation’s digital badges takes hold, game-based learning may become an acceptable, even accredited, alternative path to higher education.


If that happens, the dams will burst and the most significant changes in education since the Industrial Revolution will sweep away previous notions of what learning looked like.


Photo credit:  by annais, Flickr Creative Commons


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Social Entrepreneurs, World Examples of Social Innovation & Change | World Economic Forum

Social Entrepreneurs, World Examples of Social Innovation & Change | World Economic Forum | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

As different as their fields of engagement may be, they all share their commitment for social change and social innovation.



  • Victoria is from Tanzania. She founded SELFINA, realizing a micro-leasing arrangements to increase incomes of self-employed women.
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  • Norbert from Germany, runs IQ consult: an agency for social innovation that offers training, coaching, micro-financing and mentoring for disadvantaged groups to increase employment.
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  • 1001 fontaines, started by Chay, offers a simple, durable, and low-cost solution to supply drinking water in small communities in developing countries.

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Victoria Kisyombe, Norbert Kunz and Lo Chay (from left to right) are three persons from three continents with three different stories.


They, along with around 30 other participants from 20 countries, gathered at the INSEAD Social Entrepreneurship Program in Singapore from the 28th of November till the 2nd of December 2012.

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The Innovation Cities™ Report by 2thinknow : USA Australia Canada Europe Asia

The Innovation Cities™ Report by 2thinknow : USA Australia Canada Europe Asia | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
The Innovation Cities™ Framework [ICF] by 2thinknow is a broad-based framework for measurement, comparison, planning and change in and between cities. City performance in 3 factors, 31 city industry and community segments, and 162 city indicators.
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Remodel Your Meetings To Create Internal Entrepreneurs | Fast Company

Remodel Your Meetings To Create Internal Entrepreneurs | Fast Company | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Imagine going to work on a Monday, only to find that everything in your work environment changed overnight. The corporate reception area is gone, along with the receptionist, who could barely be bothered to acknowledge the likes of you, anyway.

 

In less than two hours, everything is radically transformed. Each new idea is nurtured, explored and tested rather than flatly rejected with one negative cliché after another. The glass is suddenly perceived as half-full rather than relegated to its usual half-empty status.  

 

...BlackBerries and iPhones are turned off. ...There are no emails. The focus is absolute.

 

Good ideas are immediately locked in. People claim responsibility for tasks. Small groups are formed to set plans in motion.

 

Deadlines are set for the next month, as opposed to the next year. After the meeting, everyone leaves with a one-page summary of all the decisions.

 

Read on for some great inspiration and possibly, "it could happen here!"

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